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3 Ways To Use Traveling As A Self Coaching Session

3 Ways To Use Traveling As A Self Coaching Session

There are numerous articles on traveling to find yourself, and the internet is flooded with different life coaches guiding you find the real “you”, however personal experience and scientific research proves that traveling is one of the best self coaching tools. To put travel and coaching into the same space came from my insights, extensive practice and was inspired by recent studies on health and behavior change.

Traveling as a process has positive effects on the self, and can be very rewarding! You can travel in a group or with another person, but it is even more rewarding if you travel by yourself. For some folks such experiences become business opportunities, to transfer the message and content of the travelling lifestyle. For others, there may be a breakthrough in discovering inner capabilities and thoughts.

When you travel by yourself and learn self reliance, the following factors will be developed:

Self confidence

The number one thing to be developed when pushing your boundaries – traveling, tripping, climbing, you name it! Pushing beyond your comfort zone begins with fear, strange feelings in the stomach and ends with discovery as you face people, situations and the most importantly yourself.

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Personal development

This covers activities that improve awareness and identity, develop talent and potential, enhance quality of life and contribute to the realization of dreams and aspirations. It’s all about who you choose to be during your travels.

Presence and Gratitude

Bring to the forefront your ability to appreciate where you are and what you have. Builds and strengthen your personality first, and strengthen your capacity to enjoy every experience.

Solo travelers become explorers who feel, taste, touche, experience and reflect. The transformation behind the journey will result in life changing virtue – once you leave, you’ll never be the same. Similar to coaching – it opens up the senses, increases awareness and most of all: it changes perspective, alters your points of view and conception of your own self. When you walk to your destination the process itself gives extra benefits to your productivity and happiness, and therefore it is every bit as effective an experience as life-coaching!

The research undertaken by Dr. Julia Zimmermann and Researcher Franz Neyer found long-term adventures can actually alter your personality. Prior to traveling, each and every participant was required to take a test that measured the “Big Five” personality aspects: openness to experience, agreeableness, extraversion, emotional stability and conscientiousness.

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In comparison to those who did not travel, those who did scored higher in conscientiousness, openness to experience, emotional stability and agreeableness.

Here are a few questions and affirmations I came across in my journeys that I would like to share.

Questions:

–          What makes me feel happy here?

–          What can I do for you?

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–          What is the best thing I can do today?

Affirmations for anywhere you go:

–          Open your heart and mind to give and receive.

–          Appreciate, accept, and acknowledge what comes your way.

Traveling – whether an inner journey or actual trip, brings practical benefit to the self. The purpose of life coaching is to bring a sense of inner peace to the participant – a state of being mentally and spiritually at peace, with enough knowledge and understanding to keep oneself strong in the face of discord or stress. This state can be measured and brings the following results according to the research. To summarize, participants were more self-sufficient and self-reliant, they sounded more upbeat and flexible, felt healthy, relaxed and more enthusiastic.

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Whether you go for a short or long journey, even a brief walk from point A to B – maintaining and connecting to the self may give tremendous boons and inspiration. Go for it!

Featured photo credit: VIKTOR HANACEK via picjumbo.com

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Loreta Pivoriunaite

Life scientist, Coach

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The Gentle Art of Saying No

The Gentle Art of Saying No

No!

It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

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But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

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What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

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But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here are the Top 10 tips for learning the Gentle Art of Saying No:

  1. Value your time. Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”
  2. Know your priorities. Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time? For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.
  3. Practice saying no. Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.
  4. Don’t apologize. A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.
  5. Stop being nice. Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets. Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.
  6. Say no to your boss. Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning. But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.
  7. Pre-empting. It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting, “Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”
  8. Get back to you. Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them: “After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.” At least you gave it some consideration.
  9. Maybe later. If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say, “This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].” Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.
  10. It’s not you, it’s me. This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time. Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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