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Vacations Are Good For Health And Productivity, Study Finds

Vacations Are Good For Health And Productivity, Study Finds

We live in a busy world, full of distractions. And finding some me time and peace during the chaos of the day isn’t an easy task anymore. But without taking breaks and resting properly we can’t work effectively. In fact, we can’t get anything done, focus or even get closer to our goals.

That’s because being busy and tired all the time prevents us from turning our brains off even when it’s time to relax, we can’t sleep well as a result of that, and become depressed and stressed over time.

But there’s a solution.

Vacation time allows you to experience physical and emotional benefits

You may have many things on your to-do list and truly want to do your best job and feel accomplished in the end of the day. But you also want to stay healthy and be on top of your game. That’s why you’re in need of a vacation. Once you’ve dedicated all your time and energy to work and daily tasks, though, leaving them for a while doesn’t seem like the right thing to do. You may think that things will get out of control, or that you’ll be left behind and will have to hustle even more after that.

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But these are minor issues considering the actual benefits of vacations. Because, believe it or not, they are great for your health and productivity. Here’s why:

1. Taking a vacation helps you reduce stress.

There’s nothing like leaving the stressful environment of your daily life and entering a new world, full of excitement. The study carried out be American Sociological Association shows that a bigger number of vacations leads to a decline in the psychological distress of people. And when the average worker takes more vacations per year, that becomes a beneficial determinant of population health.

2. Vacation frequency is related to mortality.

According to another study on whether vacations are good for our health, “The frequency of annual vacations by middle-aged men at high risk for CHD is associated with a reduced risk of all-cause mortality and, more specifically, mortality attributed to CHD. Vacationing may be good for your health.” While this study discussed middle-aged men, this works for all people! Whether you are a hard-working student or a few years from retirement, you deserve a vacation.

3. It helps you grow spiritually.

One of the most important aspects of having a vacation is that you get to know yourself better. You learn new things throughout the journey, but you also experience changes on the inside. And once you get back to reality, you can benefit from these by trying new techniques to be more productive in life and in business, for example.

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4. You improve your mental health.

It’s great for your brain too. Seeing new places and putting yourself in an unfamiliar environment are great for expanding your horizons, but it also improves your thinking and creativity.

5. Frequent vacations lead to a happier marriage.

The Wisconsin Rural Women’s Health Study says that females who get vacations more often are not only less depressed and have more energy in general, but are also more satisfied with their marriage.

6. You connect with nature.

According to a study from the University of Exeter Medical School in Britain, being closer to green space improves your mental health right away, and that effect can be sustained for longer. All these are great. And people who frequently travel (even if it’s not abroad), live a much happier life and are more productive.

But then there are those who really can’t afford to take a vacation. Be it because their work is too demanding, are starting a new job, have many things to take care of at home, or else. However, there’s another, even simpler, solution for them. It doesn’t require going away for a vacation, but it does offer similar benefits.

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How to Take a Break When You Can’t Get a Vacation?

Action One: Unplug

Falling asleep with devices around you is one of the reasons why you can’t have a good night’s sleep. It’s also why you can stay awake in bed for hours, and wake up in a bad mood as a result.

So, avoid any technology at least an hour before bed. It may be the only time in the day when you’ll unplug completely, but it will lead to great changes. Set some limits and you’ll soon double your productivity.

Action Two: Have some me time

A great way to avoid burnout at work is to make sure you have some time just for yourself daily. The best choice, and the easiest to start doing right away, is to wake up a bit earlier than you currently do, and use that time to have a pleasant morning ritual. You may journal, read something inspiring, meditate, listen to music, or just drink your coffee slowly and do nothing.

Be sure that this little practice will soon become your best habit. It’s sacred time and no one can take it from you. Dedicate time to it daily and you’ll be less stressed throughout the whole day. You’ll also handle problems at work easily and will generate ideas quickly.

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Action Three: Meditate

It doesn’t need to take long. It may be just sitting still for 2 minutes and trying to empty your mind. That’s all there is to this simple practice, but the benefits are amazing. You increase blood flow, slow the heart rate and eliminate stress. It also improves your immune system and memory. So give it a try.

That’s how you can be relaxed, productive and healthier without having to take a vacation.

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Last Updated on September 20, 2018

How to Stay Calm and Cool When You Are Extremely Stressful

How to Stay Calm and Cool When You Are Extremely Stressful

Being in a hurry all the time drains your energy. Your work and routine life make you feel overwhelmed. Getting caught up in things beyond your control stresses you out…

If you’d like to stay calm and cool in stressful situations, put the following 8 steps into practice:

1. Breathe

The next time you’re faced with a stressful situation that makes you want to hurry, stop what you’re doing for one minute and perform the following steps:

  • Take five deep breaths in and out (your belly should come forward with each inhale).
  • Imagine all that stress leaving your body with each exhale.
  • Smile. Fake it if you have to. It’s pretty hard to stay grumpy with a goofy grin on your face.

Feel free to repeat the above steps every few hours at work or home if you need to.

2. Loosen up

After your breathing session, perform a quick body scan to identify any areas that are tight or tense. Clenched jaw? Rounded shoulders? Anything else that isn’t at ease?

Gently touch or massage any of your body parts that are under tension to encourage total relaxation. It might help to imagine you’re in a place that calms you: a beach, hot tub, or nature trail, for example.

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3. Chew slowly

Slow down at the dinner table if you want to learn to be patient and lose weight. Shoveling your food down as fast as you can is a surefire way to eat more than you need to (and find yourself with a bellyache).

Be a mindful eater who pays attention to the taste, texture, and aroma of every dish. Chew slowly while you try to guess all of the ingredients that were used to prepare your dish.

Chewing slowly will also reduce those dreadful late-night cravings that sneak up on you after work.

4. Let go

Cliche as it sounds, it’s very effective.

The thing that seems like the end of the world right now?

It’s not. Promise.

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Stressing and worrying about the situation you’re in won’t do any good because you’re already in it, so just let it go.

Letting go isn’t easy, so here’s a guide to help you:

21 Things To Do When You Find It Hard To Let Go

5. Enjoy the journey

Focusing on the end result can quickly become exhausting. Chasing a bold, audacious goal that’s going to require a lot of time and patience? Split it into several mini-goals so you’ll have several causes for celebration.

Stop focusing on the negative thoughts. Giving yourself consistent positive feedback will help you grow patience, stay encouraged, and find more joy in the process of achieving your goals.

6. Look at the big picture

The next time you find your stress level skyrocketing, take a deep breath, and ask yourself:

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Will this matter to me…

  • Next week?
  • Next month?
  • Next year?
  • In 10 years?

Hint: No, it won’t.

I bet most of the stuff that stresses you wouldn’t matter the next week, maybe not even the next day.

Stop agonizing over things you can’t control because you’re only hurting yourself.

7. Stop demanding perfection of yourself

You’re not perfect and that’s okay. Show me a person who claims to be perfect and I’ll show you a dirty liar.

Demanding perfection of yourself (or anybody else) will only stress you out because it just isn’t possible.

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8. Practice patience every day

Below are a few easy ways you can practice patience every day, increasing your ability to remain calm and cool in times of stress:

  • The next time you go to the grocery store, get in the longest line.
  • Instead of going through the drive-thru at your bank, go inside.
  • Take a long walk through a secluded park or trail.

Final thoughts

Staying calm in stressful situations is possible, all you need is some daily practice.

Taking deep breaths and eat mindfully are some simple ways to train your brain to be more patient. But changing the way you think of a situation and staying positive are most important in keeping cool whenever you feel overwhelmed and stressful.

Featured photo credit: Brooke Cagle via unsplash.com

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