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7 Signs Your Adult Children Truly Are Adults

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7 Signs Your Adult Children Truly Are Adults

Thanksgiving is fast approaching. If you’re the matriarch of the family, chances are you’re responsible for hosting a large feast for the whole family. The question is: Are you flying solo slaving in the kitchen or are your adult kids pitching in to help alleviate the burden? The answer to that question will indicate whether your adult children are in fact adults. Here are some other indicators:

1. Your kids ask how YOU are doing from time to time

The parent-child relationship is largely one-sided for the first 18 years of a child’s life. But by the time they fly the coop from high school or maybe even college, they start to realize their parents are people with needs, too. So they ask how you’re doing and if there’s anything they can do for you. They ask about your interests, your hobbies, your dreams. You are no longer an extension of their need.

2. You are no longer a walking ATM

The days of being asked, “Hey Mom, got a twenty?” are OVER. By this time, junior has a job and learning to pay for rent, car payments and (gasp) even his own toilet paper! I remember the time I moved into my first studio apartment. I was sitting on the john and thought, “Oh man, I’ve got to buy EVERYTHING around here!” Yup. In the growing up years, your parents become smarter by the day.

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3. The family cell phone plan is just for Mom and Dad

Don’t get me started on how many twenty-somethings are still mooching off their parents and crying, “It doesn’t cost THAT much to keep me on your family plan, can’t you do me a solid and help me out a little? I promise to call you every week!” When you start charging them for their portion of the plan or boot them off the family plan entirely, they realize that unlimited texting comes at a cost!

4. You go out for dinner on your birthday… and your kids foot the bill

In days past, when the family’s gone out to dinner, it’s typical for the parents to pick up the tab. And that’s all well and good… but the tables should turn when your kids land decent jobs and you go out for your special day. When the bill comes, they should offer to treat you to a nice meal after all you’ve done for them.

5. Your kids stop blaming you for their poor choices

The true mark of maturity is realizing you alone are responsible for your mental, emotional and financial health. Your parents (hopefully) did what they could, albeit imperfectly, as they raised you. Maybe some collateral damage was incurred along the way and as you rehash how much your parents screwed you over as a kid, you feel they owe you an apology for the decisions you’re making today. That’s wrong. Once you hit 21, you’re in the driver’s seat. Believe it, own it and move on.

6. Holiday traditions change

When your kids have kids of their own, they may insist on creating some unique traditions within their little families… and it may not include you. That’s okay. Give them Christmas morning with their kids and negotiate a lunch or dinner with you. You had 18 years to dictate holiday traditions with your little ones and now as they launch families of their own, it’s time to support their wishes… while still keeping room in their hearts for you.

7. Instead of trying to fix you, your kids honor you

It baffles my mind when I see kids make their parents’ health, hobbies and marriage their business. It’s totally not. Maybe your parents are perfectly content watching FOX News all day and shouting at the television. To you it might be a complete waste of brain space but if your parents are happy, let them be! A mature adult realizes their parents did their job raising you and it’s not your job to now raise them.

Featured photo credit: Gabriela Pinto, Flickr, Creative Commons, June 6, 2011 via creativecommons.org

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Last Updated on January 5, 2022

How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

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How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

Children are most likely to say that they want to just lounge around or rest for a while after spending hours listening to lecture after lecture from their teachers. There is nothing wrong with this if they had a rough day.

What’s disturbing, is if they deliberately stay away from schoolwork or procrastinate when it comes to reviewing for their tests or completing an important science project.

When it seems that it is becoming a habit for your child to put off school work, it’s time for you to step in and help your child develop good study habits to get better grades. It is important for you to emphasize to your child the importance of setting priorities early in life. Don’t wait for them to flunk their tests, or worse, fail in their subjects before you talk to them about it.

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You can help your children hurdle their tests with these 7 tips:

1. Help them set targets

Ask your child what they want to achieve for that particular school year. Tell them to set a specific goal or target. If they say, “I want to get better grades,” tell them to be more specific. It will be better if they say they want to get a GPA of 2.5 or higher. Having a definite target will make it easier for them to undertake a series of actions to achieve their goals, instead of just “shooting for the moon.”

2. Preparation is key

At the start of the school year, teachers provide an outline of a subject’s scope along with a reading list and other course requirements. Make sure that your child has all the materials they need for these course requirements. Having these materials on hand will make sure that your child will have no reason to procrastinate and give them the opportunity to study in advance.

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3. Teach them to mark important dates

You may opt to give them a small notebook where they can jot down important dates or a planner that has dates where they can list their schedule. Ask them to show this to you so you can give them “gentle reminders” to block off the whole week before the dates of an exam. During this week, advise your child to not schedule any social activity so they can concentrate on studying.

4. Schedule regular study time

Encourage your child to set aside at least two hours every day to go through their lessons. This will help them remember the lectures for the day and understand the concepts they were taught. They should be encouraged to spend more time on subjects or concepts that they do not understand.

5. Get help

Some kids find it hard to digest or absorb mathematical or scientific concepts. Ask your child if they are having difficulties with their subjects and if they would like to seek the help of a tutor. There is nothing wrong in asking for the assistance of a tutor who can explain complex subjects.

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6. Schedule some “downtime”

Your child needs to relax from time to time. During his break, you can consider bringing your child to the nearest mall or grocery store and get them a treat. You may play board games with them during their downtime. The idea is to take his mind off studying for a limited period of time.

7. Reward your child

If your child achieves their goals for the school year, you may give them a reward such as buying them the gadget they have always wanted or allowing them to vacation wherever they want. By doing this, you are telling your child that hard work does pay off.

Conclusion

You need to take the time to monitor your child’s performance in school. Your guidance is essential to helping your child realize the need to prioritize their school activities. As a parent, your ultimate goal is to expose your child to habits that will lay down the groundwork for their future success.

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Featured photo credit: Annie Spratt via unsplash.com

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