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26 Simple Things You Have To Stop Doing To Move Closer To Success

26 Simple Things You Have To Stop Doing To Move Closer To Success

Are you looking for success? Many people want a successful life but they believe they don’t have what it takes. Everyone has the ability to be extremely successful – check out 27 simple things that might be holding you back.

1. Making Empty Promises

Only say things you know are true, and people will trust and respect you. A big part of success is being honest and reliable.

2. Blaming Others

Your life is in your hands – accept responsibility  for your mistakes, and you will be forced to work on improving them.

3. Looking for Others’ Approval

Unless you work for them, you don’t need their approval. Do what makes you happy and don’t worry too much about other opinions.

4. Aiming Small

You have one life – aim bigger! If you try to achieve more, it is very likely you will succeed and have a successful life.

5. Living in The Past

As the saying goes: “Yesterday’s the past, tomorrow’s the future, but today is a gift. That’s why it’s called the present.”

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Take advantage of the present, and make your time count.

6. Trying to Be Perfect

No one is perfect. Trying to be is a waste of time. Instead, learn to love your flaws and focus on overall self-improvement.

7. Trying to Do Everything Alone

For some tasks in life, you need more than one person. Don’t sell yourself short by refusing to accept help from others.

8. Waiting for Luck

Don’t wait for luck to come around – it may never arrive. Start making your own luck today.

9. Waiting in General

Try not to rely on other people or life when it comes to your own success. Take matters into your own hands whenever necessary.

10. Forgetting About Small Achievements

Small goals are important too – pat yourself on the back every time you do something you’re proud of.

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11. Being Scared of Making Mistakes

Everyone makes mistakes, including you. Acceptance of that fact, and forgiving yourself, are vital pieces to achieving success.

But make sure you learn from your mistakes.

12. Being Scared of Change

Don’t fear the unknown – you can’t improve without change.

13. Not Realizing Your Potential

You are smart and motivated – embrace these traits and see what you can achieve.

14. Giving Up

Life will have ups and downs – don’t let the bad parts stop you working towards the good parts.

15. Holding Onto Grudges

If someone hurt you in the past, they can no longer change that. Let your anger go – it’s not helping anyone, including yourself.

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16. Not Having a Positive Attitude

With a negative attitude, you will see the worst parts of the world. Keep a positive attitude, and you will see all of the opportunities the world has to offer.

17. Trash Talking

If you don’t like someone, don’t talk about them and avoid associating with them. Gossiping about others is more likely to reflect badly on you than them.

18. Not Focusing on Being Happy

Happiness doesn’t just happen; it takes work, so try to do at least one thing every day that puts a smile on your face.

19. Not Having a Career Plan

Your work takes up 40 hours (or more) of your week. Make sure you find something you enjoy and feel proud of.

20. Not Having a Life Plan

Fail to plan and life will pass you by. So, make sure you think of the future as well as enjoying the present.

21. Missing Out on Opportunities to Learn

Education doesn’t finish with school – the whole world is full of life lessons that will help you to gain success and happiness.

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22. Spending Time with Negative People

Your friends should lift you up and motivate you to achieve more – if they don’t, you don’t need them in your life.

23. Not Being Happy for Others

If someone else gains success, they don’t take your success away. Remember this and be happy for anyone you know who is enjoying a successful life.

24. Not Listening

If you only talk and don’t listen, you can miss many great opportunities for success. Don’t let this happen to you – keep your ears open!

25. Not Allowing Yourself to Relax

The most successful people make sure they take breaks to relax and unwind. Without a chance to relax, you will struggle to work effectively. So, remember to put your feet up when you can.

26. Settling

You can always achieve more and gain greater success – don’t settle if you’re not 100% happy with your lot.

More by this author

Amy Johnson

Amy is a writer who blogs about relationships and lifestyle advice.

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Last Updated on November 11, 2020

The New Lifehacking #7 – Why You Should Be Open to New Stuff, But Wary About Using It

The New Lifehacking #7 – Why You Should Be Open to New Stuff, But Wary About Using It

This is the seventh and final article describing The New Lifehacking. In this series, I described the need for you, a Lifehacker, to focus on making fundamental changes to your habitual methods, rather than chasing the latest gadget or tip. The best way to accomplish this change is to gain an understanding of your current systematic methods, and to use this knowledge to set new targets.

However, using this approach by itself, as logical as it sounds, could close the door to future improvements.

If you only focus on your own methods and keep your head down, you could miss opportunities to improve. The fact is, inspiration to change often arises from the stories, examples and insights of other people, and in order to keep things fresh, you need to be open to these new, possibly contrarian, concepts.

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How Do You Look for New Ideas and Gadgets?

If you are a new Lifehacker, you search cautiously. There are new books, blog posts, lists and gadgets coming out all the time, and there’s no way to cover every possible improvement–you simply can’t keep up. You can trust, however, that there are others on the Internet who will curate these concepts for you and continuously share them until they start to resonate.

After an idea or shortcut gets mentioned a few times in an intelligent way by people that you respect, it’s probably time to pay attention and add the new resource to a list of items to research. This is one way to crowdsource the job of sifting through new ideas in a way that saves you a lot of time and effort.

How Do You Evaluate New Ideas and Gadgets?

While you need to be open to new suggestions for possible improvement, you need to adopt an entirely different process in order to evaluate them. A healthy dose of skepticism is required if you are to escape the trap of grabbing the latest-greatest-hottest “thingy,” only to see it fail. The fact is, a particular improvement may help one person and at the same time hinder others. You need to look at your current habits and practices, plus your own evaluation and ask yourself if the investment in time, energy and focus is worth the payoff at the end.

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For example, I had to make some cost/benefit decisions when I considered switching over from a Palm T PDA to a Blackberry a few years ago. I tried my best to make the change slowly, aware that some of my habits needed to change in order to accommodate the new device.

Here are a few that I had to alter:

New Habit #1.

Recharging the device became a nightly requirement, versus a bi-weekly option. This meant plugging in the device each night. Therefore, I always needed to be near a charger and a power source.

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New Habit #2.

I switched from carrying around a paper pad to capture new tasks, to typing them into my Blackberry with its small keyboard. This meant I had less to take with me from place to place, but it also meant that ideas took longer to record. Also, when I’m on a call and need to record an appointment or phone number, the process of switching over from one function to another is fraught with danger. I still drop the occasional call.

New Habit #3.

Replacing a feature phone with a smartphone means switching from an inexpensive, robust device to one that’s expensive and more fragile. This requires me to be more careful, learning how to protect against theft, physical and adverse physical elements. I had to learn to treat my phone as if it were a precious device that simply couldn’t be just left anywhere.

New Habit #4.

As a Palm user, I was never tempted to use the device while driving. Today’s smartphone user is afflicted with the temptation to break state laws and commonsense rules of thumb by attempting to multitask in moving vehicles. Fortunately, I never developed this particular habit but that’s only because I try hard to be vigilant against all forms of distractions, especially when I’m driving. It takes mental effort to be that vigilant; it’s an entirely new habit.

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How Do You Implement New Ideas and Gadgets?

Once the decision has been made to adopt a new improvement, it’s important to make the switch consciously, with a high degree of awareness. There are likely to be a few surprises that require extra attention, and some new habits that turn out to be harder to learn than you thought. For example, I had a hard time learning to plug in my smartphone each night.

The point is maintain as many old, productive habits as possible while implementing the handful of new ones that you believe will make a difference. Unfortunately, it’s devilishly easy to make things worse, and even *much* worse. People who jump from one technology to another can attest to this fact–witness those who fail to switch to large screen smartphones that don’t comfortably fit in a holster. The size of the device forces them to abandon a trusted old habit, in search of a new one. Some simply switch back to their old devices because the “improvement” makes things worse for them.

The New Lifehacking is all about executing intelligent, individual change management. This transformation might not happen at a pace that the author of a book or an inventor of a gadget might want, but at the end of the day we, the new lifehackers, answer only to ourselves, deciding whether or not an improvement makes the deep difference that we want.

Featured photo credit: Emily Park via unsplash.com

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