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Nurses Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff

Nurses Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff

As mentioned in my previous article, my father developed a serious heart condition this past year. Despite his recent decline in health, he has remained surprisingly positive about the situation. I’m convinced one of the main things that’s helped him through this rough patch of life is the amazing care from the nursing staff at the hospitals he’s been in and out of.

The quality of care he has received from nurses has been a breath of fresh air. These events have really shown me what nurses are capable of, and how working that job must be very exhausting, mentally and physically.

I’m happy to say that medical staff, especially nurses, have saved my dad’s life multiple times this year. What sets nurses apart is that they pay attention to the little details. They leave no stone unturned.

They are compassionate, despite stress

People get scared in the hospital, because it’s a stressful and unpredictable place. Nurses handle stress with grace because they face more demanding situations than the majority of humans. In matters of life or death, split second calls makes all the difference.

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Nurses have always kept their composure in my experiences.

I received three spinal taps a few years ago. In spite of the doctor stabbing into my spinal tissue with a massive needle, the nurse in the room kept me positive through the errors and intense level of pain. She helped talk me through it, and pointed out the benefits of the procedure to my long-term health. The nurse held my hand and comforted me through the entire process.

And that’s exactly what nurses do best.

They put themselves in the patients’ shoes

Nurses understand and relate to their patients. They realize that a hospital stay is no walk in the park. When patients are at their lowest, nurses are able to identify this and grasp the patient’s perspective. Nurses converse with patients in a way that makes them feel safe and cared for. This helps put minds at ease and keeps spirits lifted.

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Realistically, nurses are extremely mindful people. They use caring words and avoid discouraging actions.

They comfort everyone in need

When I stayed with my father in a hospital several hundred miles away from our home, the nurses treated me as if I were a guest in a hotel. They did everything within their power to help me stay positive and feel welcome. Whether it was helping me find a place to sleep, getting me extra pillows and blankets, or chatting with me about the situation at hand, I felt comforted by the nursing staff at the hospital. They checked in with me regularly to see how I was coping with the stress and fear at hand. This type of behavior absolutely meant the world to me.

They possess a strong emotional IQ

It’s one thing to possess intelligence, but what’s even more impressive is emotional intelligence. A previous Lifehack article points out that emotional intelligence is determined by our level of ability to:

  • Recognize and understand our emotions and reactions (self-awareness)
  • Manage, control, and adapt our emotions, mood, reactions, and responses (self-management)
  • Harness our emotions to motivate ourselves to take appropriate action, commit, follow-through, and work toward the achievement of our goals (motivation)
  • Discern the feelings of others, understand their emotions, and utilize that understanding to relate to others more effectively (empathy)
  • Build relationships, relate to others in social situations, lead, negotiate conflict, and work as part of a team (social skills)

Emotional IQ is considered to be just as valuable as standard intelligence in workplaces. In the world of nursing, this is evergreen and essential. Nurses possess important technical skills and balance those with a high level of emotional understanding.

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They always account for human emotion.

They aren’t afraid to get their hands dirty

Nurses have to perform many duties that no one wants to do, but they don’t let it show. Helping people is their number one priority, no matter what the job, no matter how dirty or stinky. The fact is that nurses have a genuine desire to assist people with recuperation, and become what many would describe as “beautifully desensitized.”  Basically, this means that they will help no matter how disgusting the scenario may seem, and they look past things deemed disgusting by most.

It all comes down to is a genuine desire to help those facing times of dire need. When a catheter needs to be removed, a nurse will be there. When a patient is bleeding all over the place, a nurse will be there. And when bodily functions are no longer controllable, a nurse will be there.

They will be there, and they will never make you feel embarrassed or ashamed.

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Nurses don’t sweat the small details and intricacies of their job. They are always there for their patients, and that’s why it takes a very special person to fill the role of a nurse.

Featured photo credit: Bradley University Online via onlinedegrees.bradley.edu

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Robert Parmer

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Last Updated on March 30, 2020

How to Mind Map to Visualize Your Thoughts (With Mind Map Examples)

How to Mind Map to Visualize Your Thoughts (With Mind Map Examples)

Traditionally, when you have a lot of ideas in your mind, you would create a text document, or take a sheet of paper and start writing in a linear fashion like this:

  • Intro to Visual Facilitation
    • Problem, Consequences, Solution, Benefits, Examples, Call to action
  • Structure
    • Why, What, How to, What If
  • Do It Myself?
    • Audio, Images, time-consuming, less expensive
  • Specialize Offering?
    • Built to Sell (Standard Product Offering), Options (Solving problems, Online calls, Dev projects)

This type of document quickly becomes overwhelming. It obviously lacks in clarity. It also makes it hard for you to get a full picture at a glance and see what is missing.

You always have too much information to look at, and most often you only get a partial view of the information. It’s hard to zoom out, figuratively, and to see the whole hierarchy and how everything is connected.

To see a fuller picture, create a mind map.

What Is a Mind Map?

A mind map is a simple hierarchical radial diagram. In other words, you organize your thoughts around a central idea. This technique is especially useful whenever you need to “dump your brain”, or develop an idea, a project (for example, a new product or service), a problem, a solution, etc. By capturing what you have in your head, you make space for other thoughts.

In this article, we are focusing on the basics: mind mapping using pen and paper.

The objective of a mind map is to clearly visualize all your thoughts and ideas before your eyes. Don’t complicate a mind map with too many colors or distractions. Use different colors only when they serve a purpose. Always keep a mind map simple and easy to follow.

    Image Credit: English Central

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    By following the three next steps below, you will be able to create such mind maps easily and quickly.

    3 Simple Steps to Create a Mind Map

    The three steps are:

    1. Set a central topic
    2. Add branches of related ideas
    3. Add sub-branches for more relevant ideas

    Let’s take a look at an example Verbal To Visual illustrates on the benefits of mind mapping.[1]

    Step 1 : Set a Central Topic

    Take a blank sheet of paper, write down the topic you’ve been thinking about: a problem, a decision to make, an idea to develop, or a project to clarify.

    Word it in a clear and concise manner.

      What is the first idea that comes to mind when you think of the subject for your mind map? Draw a line (straight or curved) from the central topic, and write down that idea.

        Step 3 : Add Sub-Branches for More Relevant Ideas

        Then, what does that idea make you think of? What is related to it? List it out next to it in the same way, using your pen.

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          You can always add more to it later, but that’s good for now.

          In our example, we could detail the sub-branch “Benefits” by listing those benefits in sub-branches of the branch “Benefits”. Unfortunately, we already reached the side of the sheet, so we’re out of space to do so. You could always draw a line to a white space on the page and list them there, but it’s awkward.

          Since we created this mind map on a regular letter-format sheet of paper, the quantity of information that fits in there is very limited. That is one of the main reasons why I recommend that you use software rather than pen and paper for most of the mind mapping that you do.

          Repeat Step 2 and Step 3

          Repeat steps 2 and 3 as many times as you need to flush out all of your ideas around the topic that you chose.

            I added first-level (main) branches around the central topic mostly in a clockwise fashion, from top-right to top-left. That is how, by convention, a mind map is read.

            In the next section, we are covering the three strategies to building your maps.  

            Mind Map Examples to Illustrate Mind Mapping

            You can go about creating a mind map in various ways:

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            • Branch by Branch: Adding whole branches (with all of their sub-branches), one by one.
            • Level by Level: Adding elements to the map, one level at a time. That means that firstly, you add elements around the central topic (main branches). Then, you add sub-branches to those main branches. And so on.
            • Free-Flow: Adding elements to your mind map as they come to you, in no particular order.

            Branch by Branch

            Start with the central topic, add a first branch. Focus on that branch and detail it as much as you can by adding all the sub-branches that you can think of.

              Then develop ideas branch by branch.

                A branch after another, and the mind map is complete.

                  Level by Level

                  In this “Level by Level” strategy, you first add all the elements that you can think of around the central topic, one level deep only. So here you add elements on level 1:

                    Then, go over each branch and add the immediate sub-branches (one level only). This is level 2:

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                      Idem for the next level. This is level 3. You can have as many levels as you want in a mind map. In our example, we only have 3 levels. Now the map is complete:

                        Free-Flow

                        Basically, a free flow strategy of mind mapping is to add main branches and sub-topics freely. No rules to restrict how ideas should flow in the mind map. The only thing to pay attention to is that you need to be careful about the level of the ideas you’re adding to the mind map — is it a main topic, or is it a subtopic?

                          I recommend using a combination of the “Branch by Branch” and the “Free-Flow” strategies.

                          What I normally do is I add one branch at a time, and later on review the mind map and add elements in various places to finish it. I also sometimes build level 1 (the main branches) first, then use a “Branch by Branch” approach, and later finish the map in a “Free-Flow” manner.

                          Try each strategy and combinations of strategies, and see what works best for you.

                          The Bottom Line

                          When you’re feeling stuck or when you’re just starting to think about a particular idea or project, take out a paper and start to brain dump your ideas and create a mind map. Mind mapping has the magic to clear your head and have your thoughts organized.

                          If you can’t always have access to a paper and pen, don’t worry! Creating a mind map with software is very effective and you get none of the drawbacks of pen and paper. You can also apply the above steps and strategies just the same when using a mind mapping tool on the phone and computer.

                          More Tools to Help You Organize Thoughts

                          Featured photo credit: Alvaro Reyes via unsplash.com

                          Reference

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