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Most Common Self-Limiting Beliefs That Prevent Success

Most Common Self-Limiting Beliefs That Prevent Success

The idea of being wealthy can be appealing to anyone. We all love the concept of being free and buying those things that makes us more eye-catching. However, when it comes to what price we have to pay to become successful we tend to suddenly build mental obstacles on why we might not be fit for success.

Self-limiting beliefs are self-imposed and can be an obstacle to getting ahead. The truth is that we all have self-limiting beliefs but we all simply handle them differently. Understanding what self-limiting beliefs can stand as an obstacle to our success can be pivotal to helping us breaking internal barriers.

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“We were all born equal, but where we are in life now is of our own making.” ― Stephen Richards

It takes money to make money

There is no greater fallacy or self-imposed belief than one which suddenly looms over us and makes us feel that we need to have a huge sum of money before we become the next Bill Gates. Most individuals on the Forbes 400 list are self-made billionaires! This means that it is more about seeing an opportunity and taking it, rather than about having a huge sum of money before you start out on a venture. Successful people do not limit their thoughts or possibilities with this notion or mindset. They know that even with a huge sum of money you could still fail when starting out. Rather than focus on having money before starting out, they focus on the best way they can create value and attain what they want to attain.

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It is greedy for me to want more

People think that many people who are wealthy are also evil and greedy. However, what would they say about the endless philanthropy many of these successful people do. Money is not the end in itself but rather a means to an end for many of the wealthy. With money you can achieve more, fulfill more dreams and desires, and embrace more freedom. Money in itself is not bad. But having the wrong attitude towards it can be. There is no greed in wanting to get ahead and live a better life. You could also become a channel for others to embrace more success when you set out on the road to become successful. Rather than see becoming wealthy as a greedy pursuit, see it as a road to a lot of possibilities for you and those around you.

There is not enough money to go around

You should never be limited in your vision. Actually, there are more opportunities now than ever before in history to become wealthy. There is more than enough wealth to go around. The problem is that people prefer to sit down in their comfort zones rather than explore new territories and uncharted avenues of becoming wealthy. Successful people dream big, they do not see limitations or impossibilities. Instead, they think of how they can tap into the abundance that is in circulation.

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If I become wealthy people will hate me

We think because the media shows some negative news on the successful that they are hated and not in good relationship with society. This is wrong. We all have flaws and the successful also have their flaws. What makes them different from us in this regard is that there is always a spotlight on their mistakes. However, this doesn’t mean they are hated. Rather, they are seen as icons and role models. This is why there are awards and recognitions for individuals who are successful at what they do. There is nothing broken in your relationship with people when you become successful.

Rather than keep up with such self-imposed beliefs, go out there and demand the life you deserve. You can become whatever you want to be and successful at it. You should not stop yourself from living the life you deserve.

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Featured photo credit: http://www.compfight.com via compfight.com

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Casey Imafidon

Specialized in motivation and personal growth, providing advice to make readers fulfilled and spurred on to achieve all that they desire in life.

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Last Updated on March 19, 2019

How to Learn Quickly And Master Any Skill You Want

How to Learn Quickly And Master Any Skill You Want

Have you ever heard of the idiom ‘practice makes perfect’? I’m pretty sure someone would have said that to you at least once in your life! It’s a common saying, often used to encourage someone when they’re learning or doing something that is new to them.

They may need many tries before succeeding and getting it right. It’s like learning to ride a bicycle, learning how to drive, taking up a second language, or cooking for the first time. It’s rare for anyone to ace it on their first try.

Whenever you want to start learning something new, I’m sure you’re always hoping to get good at it quickly. But the reality is, that sometimes it does take days, months or even years before you can confidently master a skill.

Using the Feedback Loop

That’s simply how learning works. You try, you gain experience, you learn from it, and you try again. And each time, you’re improving and making progress. Everytime you repeat this learning process, you’re going through something called a Feedback Loop. You’ll have to go through multiple feedback loops before confidently executing the skill.

What separates a fast learner from a slower learner is not some innate, natural talent. Instead, it’s because the fast learner understands how they learn, and has a systematic way to apply it all the time to learn a variety of things. They know how to effectively use their Feedback Loop to speed up the learning process.

So the good news for you, is that if you’re currently wanting to learn a new skill as quickly as possible, then you just need to learn how to create an effective Feedback Loop.

What is a Feedback Loop?

When we talk about feedback, it simple means getting information about how well you’re performing each time you make an attempt at practicing or applying a skill. Feedback is what tells you what went wrong, or what went right.

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A Feedback Loop is made up of 3 stages:

  1. Practice / Apply – This is the stage where you put what you want to learn into action.
  2. Measure – This is the stage where you’re acquiring information about your performance. This is also the stage that is most ignored… or done ineffectively.
  3. Learn – This is the stage where you analyze how well you performed, and make adjustments to improve and practice/apply again.

It’s important to recognize these 3 stages and put them into place each time you practice a new skill.

Many people only have Stage 1 completed, and a very unclear or fuzzy process for Stage 2, which leads to poor results in Stage 3.

A good, smooth cycle will help you continuously make improvements with each loop, creating steady progress and upgrading your understanding of the skill.

How to Have an Effective Feedback Loop

To make sure your Feedback Loop is effective, you will have to look at 3 key factors: Consistency, Speed, and Accuracy.

Being consistent means having a regular way to get the same quality of feedback. You need to be able to compare every practice or learning experience in order to measure, learn and make adjustments. If your feedback is not consistent, then you’re going to have a hard time knowing what went wrong or what went right.

For example, say you’re learning to play the guitar. If you play a different song every time you practice, you’re going to get very inconsistent feedback. Because the difficulty, rhythm, and pace of every song is different, you won’t have a reliable way to compare how well you played the current song versus the last. So, the best way to learn would be to play the same song over and over again until you get to a certain proficiency.

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Seems obvious in this case, but it’s just an example. A lot of times learning is hard because we don’t focus on keeping with a consistent environment or actions.

You’ve Got to Be Quick

Let’s move on to the second factor: speed. Having speedy or fast feedback is important because the longer it takes to get feedback, the longer it will take to improve on the skill. That’s why some people spend a tremendous amount of time practicing, but make very slow progress.

On the other hand, the best forms of feedback are almost instantaneous. The shorter the time it takes for one Feedback Loop to complete, the better. This is because you’ll have more attempts, which means more improvements within the same timespan.

How to Get Fast Feedback

So, the key to getting fast feedback is to take the skill or knowledge and break it down. Try to breakdown the skill into different components. They could be broken down into steps, subskills or processes, or even by difficulty.

For example, if the skill you want to learn involves a sequence (ie: there is a step by step process), you can break your learning down by each step. Create a Feedback Loop for each step individually instead of the whole process. Isolate the processes into different parts that you can focus and work on individually.

Let’s say you’re learning to cook. You can break this skill into steps, such as finding fresh and suitable ingredients, preparing and handling the ingredients, preparing condiments and sauces, serving and plating, etc.

Or let’s say you’d like to learn how to play soccer. You can identify the sub-skills that make up the larger learning techniques to playing soccer, and create feedback loops for each of them individually. So you could start by learning how to dribble the ball, followed by passing, and then shooting.

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The third and final factor to an effective Feedback Loop, is Accuracy. This means having feedback that actually reflects your performance accurately. Since you’re relying on feedback to tell you what and where to improve on the next time, this is very important. This is why measuring feedback is a key skill to have for an effective Feedback Loop.

How to Measure Feedback

Obtaining accuracy in feedback becomes a common weak point for many learners, because it’s not always easy to define what “accuracy” means.

To get accurate feedback, we have to have a way of measuring it. The reason why we sometimes get poor feedback is because we’re trying to measure our progress without quantifying our performance. Or, we’re using the wrong metrics to quantify the feedback. Worse yet, it might just be that you were never measuring or recording your performance at all! Can you recall yourself being in a similar situation?

In order to find areas for improvement, you have to be able to compare your current performance with your previous performance. This is so that you have a baseline, or something to measure up against, to look for room for improvements.

Quantifying is a way to accurately measure your performance. Quantifying something means attaching a number to it. This helps to give objectivity and consistency when comparing two things. Quantifying feedback can give you constructive information that will help you improve during each cycle of the feedback loop.

Let’s say you’re practicing how to dribble a basketball. The first time you dribble, your coach tells you you’re doing a good job. The second time round, you get better and your coach affirms you by saying you’ve done a great job! Sure, your dribbling skill has improved–you know it, your coach knows it, but by how much? And how can you further improve your dribbling skills? A good job versus a great job doesn’t indicate how well you’ve performed, and how much better you can perform.

But, now in the second scenario, if you manage to dribble the basketball up and down the court 4 times continuously without letting the ball slip, your coach tells you you’ve done a good job. In the second round, your coach now tells you to dribble the basketball up and down the court 8 times continuously without letting the ball slip. You managed to do that and your coach tells you great job! You can now quantify your improvement by the number of times you were able to dribble the basketball across the court.

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With a quantity attached to your performance, you’re now able to push yourself further by learning to dribble 16 times or more across the basketball court. You can even add in new obstacles like having to dribble across the court with an opponent trying to snatch your basketball. If you’re successful, you can try dribbling across the court with 2 opponents snatching your basketball, so on and so forth. You’re now able to easily quantify your improvement.

Continuously Improve Your Feedback Loop!

So now that you’re familiar with the Feedback Loop, are you ready to put it into practice? What’s a new skill that you’d like to start on?

Try implementing every stage of the Feedback Loop when learning this new skill and see for yourself, whether your learning improves at a quicker rate.

It is essential to continuously improve your Feedback Loop in order to keep up your momentum, and avoid running into the law of diminishing returns. Improving your Feedback Loop means knowing what to measure next, and what questions to ask, to find out.

In fact, the technique you’ve learned from this article is only part of our 7 Cornerstone Skills.

If you’d like to discover more gems that will help you speed up your learning and push yourself towards the goals that you’ve been striving for, check out our ultimate solution here that will help you reach any goals in life.

Featured photo credit: Adeolu Eletu via unsplash.com

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