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4 Thoughts You Have that May Be Holding You Back

4 Thoughts You Have that May Be Holding You Back

Why are most of us struggling to obtain success? You likely experience a pattern of thoughts that hold you back so you can create the success you need. From thinking your lack of success is the fault of others to negative past experiences, you may be holding yourself back. Here are a few main ways you are holding yourself back:

Blaming Others

This is a very common thought process that results in many people not taking action on their goals. They get held back in the thought that it’s the fault of their parents, teachers, government or somebody else. But when we get adulthood we struggle to switch from being reliant on others to get by, to being responsible for ourselves.

So, we blame others for not handing us success. We say things like “How dare the government cut my benefits, how am I supposed to live?” or “I would have decent education if I just had a good teacher at school”.

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What we should be doing is looking at ourselves and wondering why we aren’t getting the pay rise or promotion or getting that job in the first place. We must put in the work to reap the rewards and not blame others for our own misfortune. Nobody is going to give you more than you are worth and just hand you success on the plate because you think that is what you are due. We need to take responsibility for our own lives and create our own success.

A Lack Of Resources

“I can’t start on online business, I just don’t have to time, money or skills to do it.” “I can’t go to the gym because it is just too far away and too expensive.” “I can’t find my perfect partner because I just don’t have the time to go out and meet people.” Sound familiar?

We commonly use these excuses to get out of working hard on even the things that we want to do and makes us happy. We spend hours a day in front of the television and then say we don’t have time to go to the gym or take a class. We waste our money on things we don’t need, then say we don’t have the money to start a business. We need to turn this on the head and instead of making excuses, we need to get up out of our comfort zone and do the things we have to do to create the success and happiness we deserve and want.

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Fear Of Failure

A lot of people don’t aim for that high because they automatically think they will fail and be a laughingstock of their friends, family and colleagues. When what they should be thinking is that failure is part of learning and creating success. It is legend that Thomas Edison failed 10,000 times before inventing the light bulb.

And he invented other things along the way. How many times did you mumble your words when you learnt to speak, how many times did you fall of your bike when you learnt to ride it, how many times to did you fall ever when you learnt to walk? Failure is a prerequisite to success, embrace it.

A Negative Past

A common struggle with people and their thoughts is maybe there was a past struggle or affliction that can hold us back. Growing up with illness and at a result we struggle with school and learning. Maybe not having the support structure that is seen as the norm can hold us back.

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This is understandable to a certain extent, but how many times have we heard stories of people, like rapper 50 Cent, who lived a life of crime and even nearly died after being shot, then went on to being a successful musician.

And there are many others who are brought up in broken homes with very little and can’t see a way out. You just got to find the right key to the right door. And that key is hard work on the right things and the door is your dream lifestyle. Take action now, become an inspiration.

We all have negative thoughts, it is how we use them that either holds us back or creates the success we crave.

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How do you handle you negative thoughts?  Do they hold you back?

Featured photo credit: Clement/Luigi Morante via imcreator.com

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Last Updated on July 8, 2020

How to Prevent Decision Fatigue From Clouding Your Judgement

How to Prevent Decision Fatigue From Clouding Your Judgement

What is decision fatigue? Let me explain this with an example:

When determining a court ruling, there are many factors that contribute to their final verdict. You probably assume that the judge’s decision is influenced solely by the nature of the crime committed or the particular laws that were broken. While this is completely valid, there is an even greater influential factor that dictates the judge’s decision: the time of day.

In 2012, a research team from Columbia University[1] examined 1,112 court rulings set in place by a Parole Board Judge over a 10 month period. The judge would have to determine whether the individuals in question would be released from prison on parole, or a change in the parole terms.

While the facts of the case often take precedence in decision making, the judges mental state had an alarming influence on their verdict.

As the day goes on, the chance of a favorable ruling drops:

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    Image source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

    Does the time of day, or the judges level of hunger really contribute that greatly to their decision making? Yes, it does.

    The research went on to show that at the start of the day the likelihood of the judging giving out a favorable ruling was somewhere around 65%.

    But as the morning dragged on, the judge became fatigued and drained from making decision after decision. As more time went on, the odds of receiving a favorable ruling decreased steadily until it was whittled down to zero.

    However, right after their lunch break, the judge would return to the courtroom feeling refreshed and recharged. Energized by their second wind, their leniency skyrockets back up to a whopping 65%. And again, as the day drags on to its finish, the favorable rulings slowly diminish along with the judge’s spirits.

    This is no coincidence. According to the carefully recorded research, this was true for all 1,112 cases. The severity of the crime didn’t matter. Whether it was rape, murder, theft, or embezzlement, the criminal was more likely to get a favorable ruling either early in the morning, or after the judges lunch break.

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    Are You Suffering from Decision Fatigue Too?

    We all suffer from decision fatigue without even realizing it.

    Perhaps you aren’t a judge with the fate of an individual’s life at your disposal, but the daily decisions you make for yourself could hinder you if you’re not in the right head-space.

    Regardless of how energetic you feel (as I imagine it is somehow caffeine induced anyway), you will still experience decision fatigue. Just like every other muscle, your brain gets tired after periods of overuse, pumping out one decision after the next. It needs a chance to rest in order to function at a productive rate.

    The Detrimental Consequences of Decision Fatigue

    When you are in a position such as a Judge, you can’t afford to let your mental state dictate your decision making; but it still does. According to George Lowenstein, an American educator and economy expert, decision fatigue is to blame for poor decision making among members of high office. The disastrous level of failure among these individuals to control their impulses could be directly related to their day to day stresses at work and their private life.

    When you’re just too tired to think, you stop caring. And once you get careless, that’s when you need to worry. Decision fatigue can contribute to a number of issues such as impulse shopping (guilty), poor decision making at work, and poor decision making with after work relationships. You know what I’m talking about. Don’t dip your pen in the company ink.

    How to Make Decision Effectively

    Either alter the time of decision making to when your mind is the most fresh, or limit the number of decisions to be made. Try utilizing the following hacks for more effective decision making.

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    1. Make Your Most Important Decisions within the First 3 Hours

    You want to make decisions at your peak performance, so either first thing in the morning, or right after a break.

    Research has actually shown that you are the most productive for the first 3 hours[2] of your day. Utilize this time! Don’t waste it on trivial decisions such as what to wear, or mindlessly scrolling through social media.

    Instead, use this time to tweak your game plan. What do you want to accomplish? What can you improve? What steps do you need to take to reach these goals?

    2. Form Habits to Reduce Decision Making

    You don’t have to choose all the time.

    Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, but it doesn’t have to be an extravagant spread every morning. Make a habit out of eating a similar or quick breakfast, and cut that step of your morning out of the way. Can’t decide what to wear? Pick the first thing that catches your eye. We both know that after 20 minutes of changing outfits you’ll just go with the first thing anyway.

    Powerful individuals such as Steve Jobs, Barack Obama, and Mark Zuckerberg don’t waste their precious time deciding what to wear. In fact, they have been known to limiting their outfits down to two options in order to reduce their daily decision making.

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    3. Take Frequent Breaks for a Clearer Mind

    You are at your peak of productivity after a break, so to reap the benefits, you need to take lots of breaks! I know, what a sacrifice. If judges make better decisions in the morning and after their lunch break, then so will you.

    The reason for this is because the belly is now full, and the hunger is gone. Roy Baumeister, Florida State University social psychologist[3] had found that low-glucose levels take a negative toll on decision making. By taking a break to replenish your glucose levels, you will be able to focus better and improve your decision making abilities.

    Even if you aren’t hungry, little breaks are still necessary to let your mind refresh, and come back being able to think more clearly.

    Structure your break times. Decide beforehand when you will take breaks, and eat energy sustaining snacks so that your energy level doesn’t drop too low. The time you “lose” during your breaks will be made up in the end, as your productivity will increase after each break.

    So instead of slogging through your day, letting your mind deteriorate and fall victim to the daily abuses of decision making, take a break, eat a snack. Let your mind refresh and reset, and jump-start your productivity throughout the day.

    More Tips About Decision Making

    Featured photo credit: Kelly Sikkema via unsplash.com

    Reference

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