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Here’s Why Ambiverts Are More Likely To Be Successful

Here’s Why Ambiverts Are More Likely To Be Successful

People love categorizing almost everything in the world, from genres of music to their own personality. Most people feel comfortable saying “I’m an extrovert” or “I’m incredibly introverted.” The truth is, although we might identify more with our introverted or extroverted traits, all of us exhibit characteristics on both sides of the spectrum at various points in our lives. Those who are embrace their ambiversion tend to be more successful than those who claim to be one or the other, as:

1. They have a wider range of skills

Many people blame their shortcomings on their personality type. “Oh, I could never give a speech in front of hundreds of people, I’m too introverted.” This is simply a cop-out. Being afraid of giving a speech is not the same as being physically unable to do so. Ambiverts know they have certain strengths and weaknesses, and will work on their shortcomings instead of allowing the weakness to block their path to success. It’s not that they have always had a wide range of skills; it’s that they have never let the fear of failing stop them from trying something new.

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2. They are dynamic and flexible

Ambiverts are good at going with the flow, no matter what circumstances arise. They’re not so rigid that they have to have a plan for every single moment of their day, but they also don’t fly by the seat of their pants, either. Ambiverts will set a goal for themselves, and will get there regardless of the path they have to take. They are open to contingencies, and are able to navigate through troublesome areas with ease because of this flexibility.

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3. They are strong communicators

While introverts are busy listening and extroverts are busy talking, ambiverts are right in the middle of the conversation. They know that communication is a two-way street, and understand that nothing will ever get done if they either take a backseat to another team member who does all the talking, or if they themselves talk too much without soliciting ideas from their team. Being great listeners, ambiverts will never enter a conversation simply wanting to get their way. While they will enter into dialogue in order to get their ideas out in the open, they do so in order to be constructive with these ideas rather than to shove them into their colleagues’ faces.

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4. They are balanced

Ambiverts find a balance in life that self-proclaimed intro- and extroverts simply do not. While introverts miss out on many social opportunities because they isolate themselves in their apartments all weekend, ambiverts know the importance of showing their face at happy hour, if only for a short period of time. On the other hand, while extroverts are constantly out and about just because they have a fear of missing out on something big happening, ambiverts are more than happy spending a quiet Friday curled up with a book after a long week of work once in a while. While introverts and extroverts would never be caught in a situation considered to be outside their norm, ambiverts strive to experience as much of the world as possible.

5. They’re more likeable

Because of their ability to adapt to different situations, ambiverts tend to get along well with everyone they meet. They know that some people love to talk, and others love to listen, but they don’t act as if these people are “too loud” or “too quiet.” Since they don’t label themselves or other people as introverts or extroverts, ambiverts see other people as individuals with unique qualities and characteristics. This allows them to see each person they meet for who they are, rather than assuming they fit into a specific “type.” Since they treat all people as they deserve to be treated, ambiverts are seen as likeable by people of all walks of life.

Featured photo credit: Hope For Balance / Bob ~ Barely Time 4 Flickr via farm9.staticflickr.com

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Last Updated on August 15, 2018

Who Says All Introverts Hate Socializing? Here’s The Truth About Introvert And Extrovert

Who Says All Introverts Hate Socializing? Here’s The Truth About Introvert And Extrovert

You think you may know the difference between introverts and extroverts – the common misconception is that introverts are shy and don’t like to socialize, and that extroverts are outgoing and love to be in the spotlight. But actually, there is much more to it when you scrape the surface. These two personality types are different in how they recharge their batteries and how they respond to stimuli from the environment.

    Source: Lifehack

    For example, being at a party, surrounded by noise and people, or taking up a challenging hobby pumps extroverts with energy. On the other hand, introverts don’t actually shy away from social gatherings, but to recharge, they need some time alone. While extroverts would stay all night at a party and feel energized, introverts would come to the party, enjoy for a while, but after some time, they would feel the need to go home and be with their thoughts.

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    Video Summary

    Extroverts and introverts differ in how they react to stimuli

    A research conducted by Michael Cohen and a team of scientists required introverts and extroverts to perform a gambling task, and the extroverts’ response when the gamble they took paid off was much stronger.[1] Thus, it comes as no surprise that they just love adventure and novelty, and it is all due to a genetic difference in our brains. This research indicated that introverts and extroverts process rewards in a different way, and it all has to do with our dopamine system.

    Carl Jung was the one who popularized the terms “introvert” and “extrovert”, but in the 1960s Hans Eysenck proposed that the differences in behavior of these two personality types exist due to differences in brain psychology.[2] Furthermore, he stated that introverts and extroverts have different levels of arousal – extroverts have lower levels of arousal thus they seek excitement to raise that level, while introverts are stimulated more easily so they try to keep excitement at a minimum and consequently keep arousal at the minimum.

    Moreover, these personality types also differ in how they process stimuli. As research suggests, extroverts have faster processing brains, as the pathway of stimuli is much shorter than in introverts’ brains, as this diagram suggests.[3]

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      Source: Fast Company

      It’s all about the dopamine, which makes extroverts want to seek additional stimuli

      Extroverts’ need to seek additional stimuli, which results in constantly seeking new hobbies and interests and cherishing the unfamiliar, may be the result of their genetic code which controls the dopamine function that forces them to look for new experiences.[4] Moreover, extroverts are more likely to seek out situations that will provide them with reward because of their dopamine system.[5]

      On the other hand, introverts prefer acetylcholine, which is another neurotransmitter. Acetylcholine also creates that pleasant feeling, but it’s related to introspection. For that reason, introverts don’t need to seek external stimuli to feel good. That is why extroverts might come off as easily distracted by new things, while introverts seem more focused.

      Introverts vs extroverts: how they react in certain situations

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        Source: Office Vibe

        It’s weekend, and time to go out, but it was a tiring week. What would extroverts do? They would definitely call some friends and go out. What would introverts do? They would rather stay at home and catch up on their reading or favorite show.

        You need to make plans for the next week. What would extroverts do? They would probably think “Why do I need to make plans? I’ll just wait and see how things unfold, and see what I would like to do.” And introverts? They would definitely have to think before deciding something and make some plans in advance.

        There is a business meeting and you have a great idea. What would extroverts do? They would definitely speak their mind and pitch their idea without thinking twice. And introverts? They would stay quiet, and speak only if someone asks for their opinion.

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        You need to move to a different place. How would extroverts feel? “Great, something new, I can’t wait to move!” And introverts? It would feel as a torture for them, as they struggle to accept changes.

        It is not possible to say that extroverts are better than introverts or vice versa. Every personality type has its good sides and bad sides, and every person should take the time to really understand and accept themselves.

        Reference

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