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10 Revealing Signs You May Already Be An Entrepreneur

10 Revealing Signs You May Already Be An Entrepreneur

Many people think that being an entrepreneur is so cool. They admire what a journey the entrepreneur takes and wish they can pick a coin or two in knowledge from the entrepreneur’s travails. Becoming a successful entrepreneur involves some outside of the box thinking, especially in a world of sophistication and complexities.

It takes guts, persistence, and drive to attain your goal as an entrepreneur. For many this can seem worrisome, especially when they feel they are simply not cut out for working under a figure of authority. They really want to make a difference instead and shoot for extraordinary business goals.

Although some of these points might sound negative, these traits are shared with successful entrepreneurs, and can be put to positive effect. You may already possess certain abilities that could determine your success as an entrepreneur, if you ever venture out to become one.

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1. You like to be the boss

You hate working for others and taking orders. You would rather lead and incite others to become better employees. You want to take charge, accept responsibility, and shoot for success in your own distinctive way.

2. You love challenges

You love to be dared and challenged to fight for what you deserve. You can’t just sit down waiting. Instead, you are ready to go all out and find answers. Challenges can be a thrill for you. They are a period of discovery and learning.

3. You hate the status quo

You can’t just swing for the conventional. You want to be different and write your own script. Rather than being what every other person settles to be, you want to be unique and unconventional in your approach for getting things done.

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4. You love taking risks

Taking risks excites you. You love to face new territories and ply new channels. You are adventurous and restless. You have got energy and ideas to make new possibilities. While others will want to play the safe zone, you understand that there is no safe zone. Rather than pursue security, you go for freedom.

5. You hate the 9-5 job

Being in a job that pays you for the time you spend sucks. You hate every part of it: colleagues who are less adventurous, bosses who are uncaring, and an environment that doesn’t challenge you. You don’t like being fixed. You would rather trade a 9-5 job for space and a new territory.

6. You think big

Average is not enough. You are willing to develop yourself, as well as improve through obstacles and trials. You want to be big and have something many people do not have. You want to be admired and looked up to, rather than to be looked down upon. You wouldn’t simply tolerate a life of mediocrity and obscurity. Instead, you would rather think and dream big.

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7. You are proactive

You are the best salesperson in the room. You are energetic and you can sell almost anything. Even when you encounter failures, you will treat it with the same energy you treat success. You are full of life and relish telling others what needs to be done.

8. You love reading about successful entrepreneurs

You enjoy reading tales of success. You are inspired by tales of icons who became persons of note in society, after going through the trials and tribulations of adversity. Their stories propel you to be bolder and more passionate about your goals. In fact, you yearn to be just like these inspiring figures.

9. You are a problem solver

Where others see problems, you see opportunities. You wonder why others cannot see common or simple solutions to problems. You are an outside of the box thinker, you are creative, you are an idea generator, and you are not for complexities, but simplicities.

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10. You are empathetic

You love to contribute and help others who are in need of your help. You treat the worry of others as your own. Rather than whine or make excuses, you’ll find ways to better the lives of those who surround you. Reaching out and putting extra work doesn’t bother you. Rather, you simply want to make sure things around you get better and the job gets done.

Featured photo credit: http://www.compfight.com via compfight.com

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Casey Imafidon

Specialized in motivation and personal growth, providing advice to make readers fulfilled and spurred on to achieve all that they desire in life.

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Last Updated on March 30, 2020

How to Mind Map to Visualize Your Thoughts (With Mind Map Examples)

How to Mind Map to Visualize Your Thoughts (With Mind Map Examples)

Traditionally, when you have a lot of ideas in your mind, you would create a text document, or take a sheet of paper and start writing in a linear fashion like this:

  • Intro to Visual Facilitation
    • Problem, Consequences, Solution, Benefits, Examples, Call to action
  • Structure
    • Why, What, How to, What If
  • Do It Myself?
    • Audio, Images, time-consuming, less expensive
  • Specialize Offering?
    • Built to Sell (Standard Product Offering), Options (Solving problems, Online calls, Dev projects)

This type of document quickly becomes overwhelming. It obviously lacks in clarity. It also makes it hard for you to get a full picture at a glance and see what is missing.

You always have too much information to look at, and most often you only get a partial view of the information. It’s hard to zoom out, figuratively, and to see the whole hierarchy and how everything is connected.

To see a fuller picture, create a mind map.

What Is a Mind Map?

A mind map is a simple hierarchical radial diagram. In other words, you organize your thoughts around a central idea. This technique is especially useful whenever you need to “dump your brain”, or develop an idea, a project (for example, a new product or service), a problem, a solution, etc. By capturing what you have in your head, you make space for other thoughts.

In this article, we are focusing on the basics: mind mapping using pen and paper.

The objective of a mind map is to clearly visualize all your thoughts and ideas before your eyes. Don’t complicate a mind map with too many colors or distractions. Use different colors only when they serve a purpose. Always keep a mind map simple and easy to follow.

    Image Credit: English Central

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    By following the three next steps below, you will be able to create such mind maps easily and quickly.

    3 Simple Steps to Create a Mind Map

    The three steps are:

    1. Set a central topic
    2. Add branches of related ideas
    3. Add sub-branches for more relevant ideas

    Let’s take a look at an example Verbal To Visual illustrates on the benefits of mind mapping.[1]

    Step 1 : Set a Central Topic

    Take a blank sheet of paper, write down the topic you’ve been thinking about: a problem, a decision to make, an idea to develop, or a project to clarify.

    Word it in a clear and concise manner.

      What is the first idea that comes to mind when you think of the subject for your mind map? Draw a line (straight or curved) from the central topic, and write down that idea.

        Step 3 : Add Sub-Branches for More Relevant Ideas

        Then, what does that idea make you think of? What is related to it? List it out next to it in the same way, using your pen.

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          You can always add more to it later, but that’s good for now.

          In our example, we could detail the sub-branch “Benefits” by listing those benefits in sub-branches of the branch “Benefits”. Unfortunately, we already reached the side of the sheet, so we’re out of space to do so. You could always draw a line to a white space on the page and list them there, but it’s awkward.

          Since we created this mind map on a regular letter-format sheet of paper, the quantity of information that fits in there is very limited. That is one of the main reasons why I recommend that you use software rather than pen and paper for most of the mind mapping that you do.

          Repeat Step 2 and Step 3

          Repeat steps 2 and 3 as many times as you need to flush out all of your ideas around the topic that you chose.

            I added first-level (main) branches around the central topic mostly in a clockwise fashion, from top-right to top-left. That is how, by convention, a mind map is read.

            In the next section, we are covering the three strategies to building your maps.  

            Mind Map Examples to Illustrate Mind Mapping

            You can go about creating a mind map in various ways:

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            • Branch by Branch: Adding whole branches (with all of their sub-branches), one by one.
            • Level by Level: Adding elements to the map, one level at a time. That means that firstly, you add elements around the central topic (main branches). Then, you add sub-branches to those main branches. And so on.
            • Free-Flow: Adding elements to your mind map as they come to you, in no particular order.

            Branch by Branch

            Start with the central topic, add a first branch. Focus on that branch and detail it as much as you can by adding all the sub-branches that you can think of.

              Then develop ideas branch by branch.

                A branch after another, and the mind map is complete.

                  Level by Level

                  In this “Level by Level” strategy, you first add all the elements that you can think of around the central topic, one level deep only. So here you add elements on level 1:

                    Then, go over each branch and add the immediate sub-branches (one level only). This is level 2:

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                      Idem for the next level. This is level 3. You can have as many levels as you want in a mind map. In our example, we only have 3 levels. Now the map is complete:

                        Free-Flow

                        Basically, a free flow strategy of mind mapping is to add main branches and sub-topics freely. No rules to restrict how ideas should flow in the mind map. The only thing to pay attention to is that you need to be careful about the level of the ideas you’re adding to the mind map — is it a main topic, or is it a subtopic?

                          I recommend using a combination of the “Branch by Branch” and the “Free-Flow” strategies.

                          What I normally do is I add one branch at a time, and later on review the mind map and add elements in various places to finish it. I also sometimes build level 1 (the main branches) first, then use a “Branch by Branch” approach, and later finish the map in a “Free-Flow” manner.

                          Try each strategy and combinations of strategies, and see what works best for you.

                          The Bottom Line

                          When you’re feeling stuck or when you’re just starting to think about a particular idea or project, take out a paper and start to brain dump your ideas and create a mind map. Mind mapping has the magic to clear your head and have your thoughts organized.

                          If you can’t always have access to a paper and pen, don’t worry! Creating a mind map with software is very effective and you get none of the drawbacks of pen and paper. You can also apply the above steps and strategies just the same when using a mind mapping tool on the phone and computer.

                          More Tools to Help You Organize Thoughts

                          Featured photo credit: Alvaro Reyes via unsplash.com

                          Reference

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