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10 Reasons Why Some People Always Seem To Know A Lot

10 Reasons Why Some People Always Seem To Know A Lot
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Ever come across someone who really seems to know everything? They can answer questions about any topic, any field and any place. They have general understanding and can explain either in brief or well detailed how and why?

Most of the time, these kind of people make a really good impression and they seem to be doing pretty good for themselves professionally and in their private lives. They seems to progress really well and pursuit excellence in all they do. Here are 10 habits they have adopted to possess this rare skill.

1. They tend to read… A LOT

These guys are on a mission to finish every book written under the sun. They read about everything and anything. From science fiction, textbook to business and romance. This habit opens up your brains to understanding and processing information easier and quicker. Not only that but it also forces your brain to challenge the status quo as you read from one publication to another that carry opposing views. Bill Gates is an avid reader and great promoter of reading

This can be achieved by setting targets for yourself to read at least 20 pages a day every day, in 1 year that is approximately 7300 pages which is an equivalent of? Lots and lots of books.

read

    2. They are curious about other people

    Dale Carnegie said you can make more friends being interested in other people than in yourself. When you open your ears to other people’s lives and experiences it can shed so much light into your own life.

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    The best people to listen to are people who share a different perspective than yours. Most human beings tend to be dismissive to people who don’t see life the way they do but hearing them out can be the most effective learning you can come across.

    Achieving these skills usually requires a lot of patience and maturity to learn from people you do not always see eye to eye, but gave others a try as we all have something to bring to the table

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      3. They teach other people

      This isn’t just about qualifying as a teacher or being a university professor, but they always take the opportunity to inform others. Whether they are the one explaining complex problems in the study group or the ones ready training technical skills in the work place, they have that need to pass it on as there is no better way to learn and discover limits to your knowledge than through teaching.

      You can do this by volunteering to teach, train informally or tutor someone.

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      teach

        4. They participate in group discussions

        Is this a dumb question? They are not afraid to look dumb for one minute than preserve and be dumb forever. They raise their hands and ask questions where they need clarity, they tackle other members reasoning just to broaden their own understanding of a specific topic.

        group work

          5. They play board games

          Nothing gets your mind working out quite like a Scrabble game, 30 seconds, Sudoku, Monopoly and millions of the board games that force you to think during relaxation.  This is a fun way of learning and you can do this by inviting a couple of your friends over for a games night in.

          6. They watch documentaries on things that have shaped the world

          The best thing about this one is, there is no need to read or have a pen and paper out in front of you. You just need to sit back and give your 100% concentration. These documentaries are very informative and provide in depth logic of things. They have scholars and experts in the fields who discuss certain topics.

          learn

            This can be achieved by ditching Netflix and other celeb reality TV show once in a while and switching onto the Discovery Channel, National geographic or the History Channel.

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            7. They network

            Attending business conferences and sermons is not just about the awesome “free food” and getting to skip a day off work, but it’s about meeting different people. The misconception out there is that networking is only to be done with people who can bring you business or benefit your company. This is not the case, you can network with people outside your industry and even those who share nothing in common with you. This is a great way to open your circle as you never know when the opportunity will arise to do really great things together.

            This can be achieved by joining different groups on LinkedIn or other meet ups online.

            8. They work on their self-development

            None of this would matter if you had no interest to develop yourself. Smart people care to get to the next level in their own personal lives; they eat better, work out, work smart and educate themselves.

            You can take it upon yourself to learn a new language, get a new hobby, learn a great skill or even just to improve in your current field and be the best that there is.

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              9. They never get comfortable

              Most people tend to do what they do all day and every day without the slightest thought to change themselves or work on themselves. Some people reach the “I’ve made it” mental state when they’ve reached a certain goal or make a specific amount of money. Yet this is counterproductive as it gives no meaning to go on and aim higher and strive for better.

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              You have to constantly be learning and keep an open mind to possibilities you never knew existed. You have to be daring enough to try rocket science type stuff. In this competitive world, there just is no room for complacency.

              Steve Jobs

                10. They have the utmost belief in themselves and their abilities

                So what does it take to be the smartest in the room? You have to believe that you are. None of these things matter if you do not believe in yourself and what you are capable of achieving. Before anything, you must believe that you can. You shouldn’t shy away out of fear or feeling embarrassed. What you have to say is worth it and someone will benefit from it. You have been equipped with everything you need to fulfill all those dreams inside of you. Don’t expect less from yourself and don’t expect it from others. Give it your all and the world will place gold at your feet

                belief

                  Featured photo credit: shujaat khan via 1.bp.blogspot.com

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                  Kayiba Mpoyi

                  Writer by birth

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                  Last Updated on July 21, 2021

                  The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

                  The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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                  No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

                  Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

                  Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

                  A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

                  Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

                  In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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                  From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

                  A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

                  For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

                  This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

                  The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

                  That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

                  Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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                  The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

                  Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

                  But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

                  The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

                  The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

                  A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

                  For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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                  But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

                  If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

                  For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

                  These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

                  For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

                  How to Make a Reminder Works for You

                  Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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                  Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

                  Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

                  My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

                  Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

                  I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

                  More on Building Habits

                  Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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                  Reference

                  [1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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