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8 Effective Ways That Can Help Fight Depression (Without Drugs)

8 Effective Ways That Can Help Fight Depression (Without Drugs)

When you look around our societies today, almost everyone is on antidepressants or knows someone who is. People who are depressed suffer from dominating sadness, a blue mood, emotional numbness, empty feelings, anxiety, hopelessness, loss of self-worth, indecision, or some combination of these. When you’re depressed, it often feels like nothing in the world can make you feel better.

Antidepressant medications help to manage depression, but these drugs often only treat the symptoms of depression and not necessarily the causes. Sometimes you may need to do more than take a pill to lift your mood and beat depression to feel good about yourself again.

Here are eight ways that may help fight depression (without medications) so you can enjoy life again.

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1. Share what you’re going through with people you love and trust.

Don’t feel embarrassed confiding in a friend or voicing your struggles. Talking about your problems or worries is not a self-centered or self-pitying endeavor; it’s an act of courage. It can be the best thing you do for yourself to lighten the burden and begin the process of regaining your happiness. The people you talk to don’t have to be able to fix you, they just need to be good listeners. Sometimes all we need is a listening ear.

2. Keep a “thought log.”

Whenever you experience negative thoughts or sudden burst of sadness, jot down the thoughts and what triggered them as clearly and succinctly as possible. The act of writing down your worries is calming and therapeutic. Review your log when you are up to it. Read it with an open mind. Consider if the negative feelings were truly warranted. Question if there’s another way to view the situation. Worries and doubts oftentimes dissolve under scrutiny. If that happens, that’s great. However, if the worries are based on genuine risks, take additional measures to manage them.

3. Redirect your focus to the positive.

Of course, this is easier said than done when you have depression. That said, studies show that when people pay more attention to the positive it leads to improved moods due to a corresponding increase in their serotonin levels. An imbalance in serotonin levels may influence mood in a way that leads to depression. One technique that can help to redirect attention to the positive is meditation. Meditation has been shown to increase dopamine levels, serotonin levels, and boost feelings of happiness. Use meditation to “turn on” a state of happiness that can replace sadness. You can also try Heart Math training, which has been shown to strengthen the part of the brain responsible for turning on the “happy state.”

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4. Go outside more.

The importance of regulated sunshine and light exposure for lifting moods (as well as energy levels) is huge. Light increases your productivity and happiness. Studies show bright light exposure may also help increase serotonin levels in the brain and alleviate depression symptoms. Aim for at least 15 minutes of sunlight a day to lift your mood. If you live somewhere with little winter sunshine, think about installing some halogen bulbs in your work area or getting a wakeup light.

5. Practice relaxation techniques.

As already hinted, daily relaxation practices bring real benefits to people with depression. They increase dopamine levels, which reduces stress and increases feelings of happiness and well-being. A daily relaxation practice can help relieve symptoms of depression. Apart from meditation, try relaxation practices like yoga or tai chi to calm your mind and increase your energy. You may add a motivational element to some practices by repeating a mantra or a word or phrase of self-affirmation as you move.

6. Get the right kinds of exercise.

A review of many of the available studies concluded that exercise is extremely effective for improving both mood and depressive symptoms. So much so, some government agencies are prescribing exercise instead of antidepressants, explaining that “the risk–benefit ratio is poor for antidepressant use in patients with mild depression.” So get exercising. Aim for about 30 minutes of exercise per day. You don’t have to sweat strenuously. You’re not training for the Boston Marathon. Exercises that are continuous and rhythmic (rather than intermittent) are good choices. This gives you lots of options like walking, swimming and stationery biking.

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7. Change the types and amounts of food you eat.

This is possibly the most effective way to fight depression and improve mood. Studies show that consuming a diet high in omega-3 fatty acids, clean saturated fats, and moderate amounts of animal protein can give your body what it needs to improve mood. Some of the proteins in whey or milk serum can actually improve mood after just a few hours. In cases of light to moderate depression, tryptophan can also help to improve mood. Even in healthy individuals who are slightly more irritable than usual, small amounts of tryptophan can make them less irritable and more agreeable.

8. Adopt a pet.

Nothing can replace the joy and pleasure of human-to-human connection, but pets can bring a lot of joy and companionship into life. They help you feel less lonely and isolated. Caring for a pet can also take your mind off your own troubles, forcing you to get up and about more. Let’s face it, if you get a dog you’ll have to walk them sooner or later. All of these examples are powerful antidotes to depression.

Bottom line:

If you find your depression is getting worse, seek help from a physician as soon as possible. If you know someone who seems to be showing symptoms of depression, encourage them to see a doctor.

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Depression is an illness (not just a mood) that can be treated. You can feel better!

Featured photo credit: Sad and depressed young woman via shutterstock.com

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David K. William

David is a publisher and entrepreneur who tries to help professionals grow their business and careers, and gives advice for entrepreneurs.

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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