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Study Finds That College Readiness Decreases When Schools Focus On Test Scores

Study Finds That College Readiness Decreases When Schools Focus On Test Scores

“By 2020, America will once again have the highest proportion of college graduates in the world.” — President Barack Obama, February 24, 2009

College opens door for its graduates and can be a path to greater economic security and civic engagement. Most of the fastest growing occupations need more than a high school diploma. A generation ago, America led the world in college graduates. Unfortunately that rank has dropped since. Even after President Obama sought to stir the nations’s competitive spirit with a pledge to retake the lead by 2020, the rank dipped from 12th to 16th in the share of adults age 25-34 holding degrees. This has caused more concern for the nation’s leadership who intend to increase the share of its 25 to 34 year olds with a college degree from 43 percent to 64 percent.

Desperate ambitions require desperate measures. This is why many American states have set attainment goals for their students over the years to boost the country’s chances in becoming a leader in post-secondary education attainment.

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Exit exams and college-going culture

Such educational reform policies channeled at penalizing schools who are not performing highly at their test scores led to a new study exploring efforts to promote a college-going culture at a Texas High School. The purpose of the study was to explore the impact of the mandates at Green High School, a pseudonym that was used by the authors for a school located in the outskirts of a major city in Texas. The study, which was recently published in The High School Journal, showed the behavioral and accidental consequences that school reform policies may have on students’ academic success.

Montrischa M. Williams, a researcher with the American Institutes for Research, and Anjale D. Welton, a professor of educational policy at the University of Illinois, looked at how these mandates may distort the instructional focus of schools and how they could actually hold a student back from being excited about college prospects.

Deterrants to college-readiness

Texas is one of 26 states that require students to pass an exam to receive a high school diploma. This exam is usually taken during junior year and used as a benchmark for a student’s capacity in math, science, reading and geography.

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While this action is meant to drive success, it has caused a negative response from teachers and students. Preventing teachers from focussing on a holistic tutoring approach is a pressure to produce improvement. They concentrate instructional time and resources on preparing students for the exit exam.

Three things discouraged a progressive learning attitude from students:

  1. Homeworks were not assigned to assess the students’ readiness for the exams.
  2. Low academic expectations for their students led to a lack of academic rigor.
  3. Poor social support from the teaching staff.

Williiams and Welton also believe that other schools across the United States could be experiencing the difficulties present at Green High School during the study period. According to Williams, “”Rather than centering performance problems on students and teachers, policymakers should take into consideration the systemic inequities and larger sociopolitical contexts in which schools operate.”

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She added, “We also need to be more aware of the impact of labeling schools ‘high minority, high poverty’ and ‘low performing,’ because these descriptors convey deficit connotations.”

Alternative methods of encouragement

While alternative methods are being pursued by other states to encourage students to pursue degrees, it should be noted that initiatives do not need an aggressive or a high cost approach. For example, college coaching, adopted in Chicago, has produced tremendous results. And similarly, you can imagine what would happen if some helicopter parents push their children too much…

Having students view brief informational videos had a similar effect, according to a Toronto study. After watching a three-minute video, students could anticipate a return on investment from pursuing a postsecondary education. Students did not make an excuse of not having enough money to fund their college education but rather found that the benefits of actually pursuing a college degree outweighed the costs.

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Featured photo credit: http://www.pixabay.com via pixabay.com

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Casey Imafidon

Specialized in motivation and personal growth, providing advice to make readers fulfilled and spurred on to achieve all that they desire in life.

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Last Updated on May 24, 2019

How to Be Productive at Home and Make Every Day a Productive Day

How to Be Productive at Home and Make Every Day a Productive Day

If you’ve ever wondered how to be productive at home or how you could possibly have a more productive day, look no further.

Below you’ll find six easy tips that will help you make the most out of your time:

1. Create a Good Morning Routine

One of the best ways to start your day is to get up early and eat a healthy breakfast.

CEOs and other successful people have similar morning routines, which include exercising and quickly scanning their inboxes to find the most urgent tasks.[1]

You can also try writing first thing in the morning to warm up your brain[2] (750 words will help with that). But no matter what you choose to do, remember to create good morning habits so that you can have a more productive day.

If you aren’t sure how to make morning routine work for you, this guide will help you:

The Ultimate Morning Routine to Make You Happy And Productive All Day

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2. Prioritize

Sometimes we can’t have a productive day because we just don’t know where to start. When that’s the case, the most simple solution is to list everything you need to get accomplished, then prioritize these tasks based on importance and urgency.

Week Plan is a simple web app that will help you prioritize your week using the Covey time management grid. Here’s an example of it:[3]

    If you get the most pressing and important items done first, you will be able to be more productive while keeping stress levels down.

    Lifehack’s CEO, Leon, also has great advice on how to prioritize. Take a look at this article to learn more about it:

    How to Prioritize Right in 10 Minutes and Work 10X Faster

    3. Focus on One Thing at a Time

    One of the biggest killers of productivity is distractions. Whether it be noise or thoughts or games, distractions are a barrier to any productive day. That’s why it’s important to know where and when you work best.

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    Need a little background noise to keep you on track? Try working in a coffee shop.

    Can’t stand to hear even the ticking of a clock while writing? Go to a library and put in your headphones.

    Don’t be afraid to utilize technology to make the best of your time. Sites like [email protected] and Simply Noise can help keep you focused and productive all day long.

    And here’s some great apps to help you focus: 10 Online Apps for Better Focus

    4. Take Breaks

    Focusing, however, can drain a lot of energy and too much of it at once can quickly turn your productive day unproductive.

    To reduce mental fatigue while staying on task, try using the Pomodoro Technique. It requires working on a task for 25 minutes, then taking a short break before another 25 minute session.

    After four “pomodoro sessions,” be sure to take a longer break to rest and reflect.

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    I like to work in 25 and 5 minute increments, but you should find out what works best for you.

    5. Manage Your Time Effectively

    A learning strategies consultant once told me that there is no such thing as free time, only unstructured time.

    How do you know when exactly you have free time?

    By using the RescueTime app, you can see when you have free time, when you are productive, and when you actually waste time.

    With this data, you can better plan out your day and keep yourself on track.

    Moreover, you can increase the quality of low-intensity time. For example, reading the news while exercising or listening to meeting notes while cooking. Many of the mundane tasks we routinely accomplish can be paired with other tasks that lead to an overall more productive day.

    A bonus tip, even your real free time can be used productively, find out how:

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    20 Productive Ways to Use Your Free Time

    6. Celebrate and Reflect

    No matter how you execute a productive day, make sure to take time and celebrate what you’ve accomplished. It’s important to reward yourself so that you can continue doing great work. Plus, a reward system is an incredible motivator.

    Additionally, you should reflect on your day in order to find out what worked and what didn’t. Reflection not only increases future productivity, but also gives your brain time to decompress and de-stress.

    Try these 10 questions for daily self reflection.

    More Articles About Daily Productivity

    Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

    Reference

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