Doers are deemed extremely valuable in groups and organizations. They are the go-to guys and girls when troubles arise. Discover if you have the 10 signs of a doer and learn how to be better one.

1. You start work with clear objectives in mind.

Good doers don’t just dive into a project without thinking. They rein in their enthusiasm long enough to formulate objectives and figure out a plan in order to succeed in whatever they’re set to do. Good doers give themselves enough time to think and plan.

2. You measure your own productivity.

Good doers know how to measure their own productivity and revel in it. Most even have a personal, internal “scoring” system. Following their own progress provides them a challenging working environment, firing them up to work harder. Good doers find and use tools to help measure their productivity (such as Toggl and RescueTime).

3. You like feeling busy but like seeing results more.

Good doers love that “busy” feeling, but they don’t allow it to cloud their judgement. They need to see tangible outcomes that show work is indeed done. To ensure their efforts are not wasted, they make use of timelines to track progress.

4. You know how to balance quality and quantity.

Good doers don’t skimp on quality despite their eagerness to do more. Though they thrive on increased productivity measured in numbers, they also make sure to set standards for quality. When working on a project, they do regular self-evaluation or ask a trusted person for feedback.

5. You create your own motivation.

Good doers are self-motivated. They look forward to working hard and improving their internal “score”. They take advantage of this wonderful trait by setting more and more challenging goals every time they finish a project. They are also humble enough to use tools that help reach their goals.

6. You relish being surrounded by other hardworking people.

Good doers like to work with other good doers, especially if they share the same goals. They know that working together is the best opportunity to compete and cooperate without anyone feeling like they lost. They find, or better yet, create an encouraging community of people who share the same goals as they do, such as GoalChiever.

7. You volunteer.

Good doers are “natural’ volunteers. They like to participate in activities that require actual work, even without pay. And while volunteering is great, good doers make sure that they leave enough time for themselves. They schedule their volunteer work appropriately so they don’t tire themselves out.

8. Your personality leans toward extroversion.

Most good doers are extroverts, especially when the work involved requires the constant company of many people. They have an almost perpetual reserve of energy that ignites enthusiasm in others.

But this doesn’t mean introverts aren’t doers. Actually, introverts reign supreme when it comes to doing solitary work (and play). This means employers shouldn’t be so quick to judge quiet employees!

9. You teach through action.

Good doers prefer to teach by, yes, doing. They demonstrate rather than explain and often encourage their students or mentees to learn by working.

As this isn’t always a good thing, good doers make sure to encourage whoever they’re teaching to ask questions. They take the time to answer them and give feedback as well.

10. You value the importance of celebrating accomplishments.

Good doers know when to stop working. They create regular opportunities to celebrate their achievements and progress and allow themselves the time to rest and recharge their bodies.

Doers tend to want to move on to the next challenge right after they finish their last one. But good doers make sure to acknowledge their successes by making celebration part of the plan from the very beginning.

While doers aren’t perfect, there’s no denying they posses some great qualities that we could use more of. So if you show the signs of a doer, learn and appreciate your strengths and work on your weaknesses. The world needs you to use your unique qualities.

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