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Have You Given Up? 7 Apps That Help You Keep Your Goals Throughout the Year

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Have You Given Up? 7 Apps That Help You Keep Your Goals Throughout the Year

According to a study at the University of Bristol, roughly 88% of Goals set in new year fail, and if you’re like the hundreds of millions of people in the world who set goals, you’ve probably had that experience before. Well, thankfully you can avoid repeating it, as long as you have a smartphone on hand. There’s an app in your favorite apps center for nearly every kind of personal tracking you can imagine, from calorie counting to learning math.

choosing a goal and sticking

    Here they are, sorted by the popularity of goals they track:

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    Get in shape: MyFitnessPal

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          There is no shortage of fitness-related apps on the market, but MFP is unique in a couple of different ways. First, it’s completely free for iOS and Android users, which is a welcome relief. Second, it is super-simple to use. The idea behind MFP is very basic—studies show that keeping track of calorie intake leads to a decrease. With that in mind, MFP is built to be gimmick-free and intuitive, and it has a large directory of foods so you don’t have to go searching the back of the cereal box.

          Get a job: JobServe Connect

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              One of the oldest job search sites on the internet also runs one of the most comprehensive job search apps around. There may not be many bells and whistles, but the database itself is the killer app here.

              Be more productive: Simply Business Guide

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                While this is not technically a mobile app, this productivity guide should work just fine on your iPhone or Android. The basic premise is that for every aspect of business that troubles you, there’s a productivity solution, whether that issue is email, travel, meetings, or anything else. Unlike other guides of the same type, Simply Business doesn’t pretend to have all the answers themselves—the guide links you to the best ideas from experts in every field, so you don’t have to guess whether the advice is good.

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                Get out of debt: Mint

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                      The internet’s favorite personal finance app also exists on iOS and Android, with versions optimized for phones or tablets. The power of Mint lies in its ability to track everything related to your finances, so you have a picture of what needs to be cut and what needs to be paid off right at your fingertips. The more information you feed Mint, the better the overview you get—especially if you link your Mint account to your financial accounts. (US & CA only)

                      Get organized: Tomboy

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                          Again, simplicity rules the day when it comes to keeping your resolutions (studies show that people with simpler and fewer resolutions are more likely to keep them). Tomboy is about as simple as it gets—a note-taking app for any general computing platform. This is another piece that isn’t exactly a phone app, but note-taking works best on a full computer anyway. Notes can be cross-linked with each other, wiki-style.

                          Learn something new: Khan Academy

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                                Salman Khan’s math tutoring videos for his nephew became a full-blown educational tool and a worldwide sensation in 2009, and Khan Academy’s mission only gets more and more ambitious. Use the iOS app for iPad to access all the videos, testing materials, and your personal account. Khan offerings have expanded from math, physics, and chemistry, out to literature, economics, and art history. Khan Academy also gives users awards for completing lessons and goals, which keeps users interested.

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                                Travel more: Kayak

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                                      The lauded travel site has a mobile app that integrates the standard Kayak graphical interface, letting you tap where you’re going rather than typing it out. Of course, the other Kayak features, like searching for specific activities such as gambling, golf, and skiing, are also available.
                                      Of course, just having an app on your phone isn’t going to solve all of your problems. You’re going to need an extra dose of focus. And while there are probably plenty of loving people in your contacts list eager to help you reach your goals, sometimes the phone just needs to take a little break. And, as luck would have it, there happens to be an app just for that purpose—it’s called Silent Time.

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                                      Last Updated on November 25, 2021

                                      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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                                      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

                                      There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

                                      Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

                                        What Does Private Browsing Do?

                                        When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

                                        For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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                                        The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

                                        The Terminal Archive

                                        While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

                                        Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

                                        dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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                                        Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

                                        Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

                                        However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

                                        Clearing Your Tracks

                                        Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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                                        dscacheutil -flushcache

                                        As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

                                        Other Browsers and Private Browsing

                                        Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

                                        If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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                                        As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

                                        Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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