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10 Smartphone Usage Rules That Will Make You a Better Person

10 Smartphone Usage Rules That Will Make You a Better Person

The virtual world is, most of the time, more enchanting than the real world. We love iPhone and other smartphones because they are portals that allow us to enter a world of our choice—when you have a good smartphone in your hand, you don’t care about your surroundings.

10 smartphone usage rules

    As a result, its not surprising that most of us end up abusing the technology instead of using it responsibly. I am addicted to my smartphone and am guilty of breaking all the rules of responsible smartphone usage: I have bored my friends and colleagues by babbling about my apps for days, I have berated my friends who use a different smartphone, and I have used my iPhone while watching a movie in a theatre.

    I realized that it is not just me who does all this—everyone around me does it too. People bellow into their phones in public, they ignore the person sitting next to them to talk on their phones, and they panic if they can’t locate their devices. Although usually polite and considerate, I too turn into a boorish technology abuser when I have my mobile in my hands. This year, I intend to follow ten rules of smartphone use and be more responsible with my iPhone, and they may help you too. Here they are:

    #1 Set a Time Limit

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    time limit

      Facebook, YouTube, games and a thousand entertaining applications tempt you to give up sleeping forever. Desist. Set a time limit: avoid using your smartphone after a certain time at night and before a certain time in the morning. Get a good night’s sleep.

      #2 Don’t Play Games All the Time

      play mobile games

        I spend hours playing games on my mobile—hours that could be used doing something constructive instead, and I bet you make the same mistake. After all, games are designed to be addictive. Play games, but only if you can put a limit on the amount of time you spend on them.

        #3 Pick Important Calls

        pick up important phone call

          A smartphone is not merely a device for receiving and making calls; it is like a fast mini-computer with thousands of applications. So, there is a tendency to ignore calls and continue with other activities (at least, I tend to do that). If someone calls you to talk about something important, you should take that call—it’s just good manners to do so.

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          #4 Avoid Obsessive Browsing

          addictive browsing

            24/7 internet connectivity is like fire: it’s a good servant, but a bad master, and most of us are slaves to it. Make a determined effort to avoid unproductive and obsessive browsing.

            #5 Don’t Photograph & Share Everything

            take photo

              This is something I am constantly guilty of doing. I want to capture every event of my life and everything around me, which isn’t necessarily bad, but I miss the present moment by focusing on capturing it and sharing it online. If you do the same, then you are missing out on real life and looking at the world through a tiny camera lens.

              #6 Don’t Ignore People

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              ignore people

                Even the most polite smartphone users ignore waiters and cash register personnel. While standing in line, we often talk on the phone to make good use of our time, but then we continue talking and just use gestures to interact with those providing us with service. Keep the caller on hold for a while and make a connection with the people in front of you.

                #7 Don’t Text Insulting Messages

                insulting message

                  It is easy to be rude and insulting while you are debating an issue via texts, especially when you are commenting on sites like YouTube. You may end up using abusive language or childish arguments because of the sense of anonymity involved. Try to avoid saying things that you would generally not say to someone’s face.

                  #8 Don’t Shout While Talking

                  shout at the phone

                    Even rude smartphone users don’t like other loud, rude mobile users. If you take a call in an elevator and start talking loudly, you will attract the focused hate of all the people around you. Whenever you are in a public place, avoid talking on your phone, or at least speak softly.

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                    #9 Don’t Text While Driving

                    text while driving

                      This is not a question of etiquette, but a question of safety. Even if you are great at multitasking, it is not a good idea to mix driving with texting—it’s a recipe for disaster. No matter how good you are, you have to take your eyes off the road and look at the phone screen to read or write texts. Avoid texting while driving it at all costs.

                      #10 Take a Break From Your Phone

                      group talking

                        Dependency is never a good thing. If you cannot live without your smartphone for a single weekend, you are addicted to it. If possible (and try to make it possible), switch off your phone and stay away from it for 48 hours. Do this at least once every year.

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                        Last Updated on May 14, 2019

                        8 Replacements for Google Notebook

                        8 Replacements for Google Notebook

                        Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

                        1. Zoho Notebook
                          If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
                        2. Evernote
                          The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
                        3. Net Notes
                          If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
                        4. i-Lighter
                          You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
                        5. Clipmarks
                          For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
                        6. UberNote
                          If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
                        7. iLeonardo
                          iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
                        8. Zotero
                          Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

                        I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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                        In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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