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Are You Ditching Work-Life Balance Because You’re Afraid of Losing Your Job?

Are You Ditching Work-Life Balance Because You’re Afraid of Losing Your Job?

Balance

    Some people think that life balance is a thing of luxury, something you pursue when times are good…that we should work like dogs  to remain indispensable in this unpredictable economy. But wait a sec. Weren’t we were already working like dogs, before we added in the fear of losing our jobs? Here’s what got me going on this subject:

    In the post Keep Your Job: A 10-Point Survival Guide at CNNMoney/Fortune, Anne Fisher quoted some sobering numbers:

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    According to a poll by the Society for Human Resource Management 60% [of US employers] plan to cut headcount. Challenger Gray & Christmas, a Chicago-based outplacement firm that closely tracks layoff statistics, predicts 1 million more pink slips in 2009, and says the job market may not bounce back until 2011.

    She goes on to share 10 excellent points offered up by executive coach Deb Bright but #7 made me gulp:

    For now, forget about work-life balance. A major preoccupation when the economy was humming along nicely, “having time for outside interests has to go right out the window now,” says Bright. “You need to concentrate on doing whatever it takes to make yourself indispensable.”

    If you’re listening with one ear, it might sound like logical advice, but a little trickster lives inside that suggestion. Work-life balance isn’t solely about balancing work and play. It’s about how you work, what you value, finding ways to match your values to your employer’s values, and accomplishing workplace goals with clarity and finesse.

    In contrast, here’s what FedEx Kinko’s employees found out about themselves thanks to DM News and the Work-Life Balancing Act:

    Nearly half – 47% – of those polled in FedEx Office’s Finding Better Balance survey say finding a better work/life balance is even more important to them in 2009, compared to last year.

    The survey, released today, queried 501 full-time, U.S. workers. Among 18- to 34-year-olds, 58% believe it will be more important to find better work/life balance in 2009, compared to 46% of those age 35 to 54, and just 30% for the 50-and-over group. In addition, 86% say they plan to actively pursue this better balance this year.

    “As we start a new year, it’s common for employees to take stock of the last 12 months and evaluate their priorities at home and in the office,” said Tracy Brightman, senior vice president of human resources for FedEx Office (formerly FedEx/Kinko’s), in a statement. “Proper work/life balance is a key factor in employee satisfaction and productivity.”

    Among those surveyed, 49% said they planned to take advantage of all vacation time in the new year; 44% said they would prioritize projects, and 42% said they would create a weekly to-do list; 41% said they would leave work at a reasonable hour and 36% said they planned to take lunch breaks on a consistent basis.

    Lack of Balance Adds Pounds to Your Body, Mind and Spirit

    Forgetting about balance is rooted in fear. And I’m guessing that a large proportion of people recently laid off we’re working like dogs to be indispensable. With so many more people on the brink of losing their jobs, fear needs balance to be a useful emotion.

    If you’ve been working hard at becoming indispensable, it’s likely that you’re working late, powering through lunch, skipping workouts, ditching networking and playing with friends. You’re probably also missing soccer games and not too thrilled about doing homework with your kids, not to mention being coherent enough to perk up your resume and research possible career opportunities. If this is true for you, you’re going to be scrambling to make up for lost time if you lose your job.

    Living in balance in a down economy is essential, not only for your wellbeing outside of work, but to assure you remain agile and flexible and capable of making good, values-based decisions in and about your work. As an example, if you were interested in maintaining a competitive advantage and being in shape to meet the next opportunity with confidence, wouldn’t working out make great sense? Who feels agile and flexible and confident with 20 or 30 extra pounds? And what about the burden of weight you’ll carry in your mind and spirit?

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    Work smart and strategically. Make sure what you choose to say yes to at work serves the company’s larger goals and your career goals. Less is more. And the only time more is more is when it’s more of less.

    Your 2 cents?

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    Last Updated on October 16, 2019

    Invaluable Lessons You Can Learn From Your Mistakes

    Invaluable Lessons You Can Learn From Your Mistakes

    Do you like making mistakes?

    I certainly don’t.

    Making mistakes is inevitable. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we could be at ease with them?

    Perhaps there is a way to think of them differently and see their benefits.

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    Why Mistakes Feel Dangerous

    Mistakes often feel dangerous. Throughout human history, our errors have often been treated as dangerous for a variety of reasons:

    • Our vulnerability. We have limited and fragile support systems. When those systems fail, people often lose their lives.
    • Real dangers. Nature can be dangerous, and making mistakes can put us at the mercy of nature and its animal residents seeking a meal.
    • Ignorance. Many cultures scapegoats someone whenever there is a failure of some kind. Scapegoating can be serious and deadly.
    • Order. Many societies punish those who do not conform to the prevailing orthodoxy and treat difference and non-conformity as a mistake. Even our brains flash an error message whenever we go against prevailing social norms.

    We have a history of handling mistakes and failure in an unpleasant way. Since each of us carries our human history with us, it can be a challenge to overcome the fear of making mistakes.

    If we can embrace the reality of mistakes, we can free ourselves to be more creative in our lives and dig up some interesting insights.

    Why We Can’t Avoid Making Mistakes

    Many people operate under the notion that making mistakes is an aberration, a mistake if you will. You can call it perfectionism but it is a more substantial problem. It is really a demand for order and continuity.

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    When we think we can eliminate mistakes, we are often working from a perspective that sees the world as a fixed place. The world, however, is not so obliging. Like it or not, the world, and everything in it, is constantly changing.

    Change is more constant and pervasive than we can see with our own eyes which is why we often miss it. Our bodies are constantly changing. The natural conditions of the earth change constantly as well. Everything, including economic and cultural systems have life cycles. Everything is in a constant state of flux.

    We cannot see all of the changes going on around us since rates of change vary. Unfortunately, when we try to create a feeling of certainty and solidity in our lives or operate from the illusion of stability and order, we are fighting reality and our natural evolution which is built on adapting to change.

    It is better to continually bend into this reality rather than fight every change we experience. Fighting it can cause us to make more mistakes. Finding the benefits in change can be useful and help us minimize unnecessary mistakes.

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    Lessons Learned from Making Mistakes

    Life has so many uncertainties and variables that mistakes are inevitable. Fortunately, there are many things you can learn from making mistakes.

    Here is a list of ways to harness the mistakes you make for your benefit.

    1. Point us to something we did not know.
    2. Reveal a nuance we missed.
    3. Deepen our knowledge.
    4. Tell us something about our skill levels.
    5. Help us see what matters and what does not.
    6. Inform us more about our values.
    7. Teach us more about others.
    8. Let us recognize changing circumstances.
    9. Show us when someone else has changed.
    10. Keep us connected to what works and what doesn’t work.
    11. Remind us of our humanity.
    12. Spur us to want to better work which helps us all.
    13. Promote compassion for ourselves and others.
    14. Teach us to value forgiveness.
    15. Help us to pace ourselves better.
    16. Invite us to better choices.
    17. Can teach us how to experiment.
    18. Can reveal a new insight.
    19. Can suggest new options we had not considered.
    20. Can serve as a warning.
    21. Show us hidden fault lines in our lives which can lead us to more productive arrangements.
    22. Point out structural problems in our lives.
    23. Prompt us to learn more about ourselves.
    24. Remind us how we are like others.
    25. Make us more humble.
    26. Help us rectify injustices in our lives.
    27. Show us where to create more balance in our lives.
    28. Tell us when the time to move on has occurred.
    29. Reveal where our passion is and where it is not.
    30. Expose our true feelings.
    31. Bring out problems in a relationship.
    32. Can be a red flag for our misjudgments.
    33. Point us in a more creative direction.
    34. Show us when we are not listening.
    35. Wake us up to our authentic selves.
    36. Can create distance with someone else.
    37. Slow us down when we need to.
    38. Can hasten change.
    39. Reveal our blind spots.
    40. Are the invisible made visible.

    Reframe Reality to Handle Mistakes More Easily

    The secret to handling mistakes is to:

    • Expect them as part of the process of growth and development.
    • Have an experimental mindset.
    • Think in evolutional rather than fixed terms.

    When we accept change as the natural structure of the world, our vulnerability and humanness lets us work with the ebb and flow of life.

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    When we recognize the inevitability of mistakes as part of the ongoing experiment which life is, then we can relax more. In doing so we may make fewer of them.

    It also helps to keep in mind that trial and error is an organic natural way of living. It is how we have evolved over time. It is better to be with our natural evolution than to fight it and make life harder.

    When we adopt an evolutional mindset and see ourselves as part of the ongoing human experiment, we can appreciate that all that has been built up over time which includes the many mistakes our ancestors have made over thousands of years. Each one of us today is a part of that human tradition of learning and experimenting,

    Mistakes are part of the trial and error, experimental nature of life. The more you adopt the experimental, evolutional frame, the easier it becomes to handle mistakes.

    Handling mistakes well can help you relax and enjoy all aspects of life more.

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    Featured photo credit: Sarah Kilian via unsplash.com

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