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Are You Ditching Work-Life Balance Because You’re Afraid of Losing Your Job?

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Are You Ditching Work-Life Balance Because You’re Afraid of Losing Your Job?

Balance

    Some people think that life balance is a thing of luxury, something you pursue when times are good…that we should work like dogs  to remain indispensable in this unpredictable economy. But wait a sec. Weren’t we were already working like dogs, before we added in the fear of losing our jobs? Here’s what got me going on this subject:

    In the post Keep Your Job: A 10-Point Survival Guide at CNNMoney/Fortune, Anne Fisher quoted some sobering numbers:

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    According to a poll by the Society for Human Resource Management 60% [of US employers] plan to cut headcount. Challenger Gray & Christmas, a Chicago-based outplacement firm that closely tracks layoff statistics, predicts 1 million more pink slips in 2009, and says the job market may not bounce back until 2011.

    She goes on to share 10 excellent points offered up by executive coach Deb Bright but #7 made me gulp:

    For now, forget about work-life balance. A major preoccupation when the economy was humming along nicely, “having time for outside interests has to go right out the window now,” says Bright. “You need to concentrate on doing whatever it takes to make yourself indispensable.”

    If you’re listening with one ear, it might sound like logical advice, but a little trickster lives inside that suggestion. Work-life balance isn’t solely about balancing work and play. It’s about how you work, what you value, finding ways to match your values to your employer’s values, and accomplishing workplace goals with clarity and finesse.

    In contrast, here’s what FedEx Kinko’s employees found out about themselves thanks to DM News and the Work-Life Balancing Act:

    Nearly half – 47% – of those polled in FedEx Office’s Finding Better Balance survey say finding a better work/life balance is even more important to them in 2009, compared to last year.

    The survey, released today, queried 501 full-time, U.S. workers. Among 18- to 34-year-olds, 58% believe it will be more important to find better work/life balance in 2009, compared to 46% of those age 35 to 54, and just 30% for the 50-and-over group. In addition, 86% say they plan to actively pursue this better balance this year.

    “As we start a new year, it’s common for employees to take stock of the last 12 months and evaluate their priorities at home and in the office,” said Tracy Brightman, senior vice president of human resources for FedEx Office (formerly FedEx/Kinko’s), in a statement. “Proper work/life balance is a key factor in employee satisfaction and productivity.”

    Among those surveyed, 49% said they planned to take advantage of all vacation time in the new year; 44% said they would prioritize projects, and 42% said they would create a weekly to-do list; 41% said they would leave work at a reasonable hour and 36% said they planned to take lunch breaks on a consistent basis.

    Lack of Balance Adds Pounds to Your Body, Mind and Spirit

    Forgetting about balance is rooted in fear. And I’m guessing that a large proportion of people recently laid off we’re working like dogs to be indispensable. With so many more people on the brink of losing their jobs, fear needs balance to be a useful emotion.

    If you’ve been working hard at becoming indispensable, it’s likely that you’re working late, powering through lunch, skipping workouts, ditching networking and playing with friends. You’re probably also missing soccer games and not too thrilled about doing homework with your kids, not to mention being coherent enough to perk up your resume and research possible career opportunities. If this is true for you, you’re going to be scrambling to make up for lost time if you lose your job.

    Living in balance in a down economy is essential, not only for your wellbeing outside of work, but to assure you remain agile and flexible and capable of making good, values-based decisions in and about your work. As an example, if you were interested in maintaining a competitive advantage and being in shape to meet the next opportunity with confidence, wouldn’t working out make great sense? Who feels agile and flexible and confident with 20 or 30 extra pounds? And what about the burden of weight you’ll carry in your mind and spirit?

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    Work smart and strategically. Make sure what you choose to say yes to at work serves the company’s larger goals and your career goals. Less is more. And the only time more is more is when it’s more of less.

    Your 2 cents?

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    Last Updated on January 13, 2022

    How to Use Travel Time Effectively

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    How to Use Travel Time Effectively

    Most of us associate travel and time with what we’re going to do one we get to our destination. Planning and mapping out what to do once you arrive can certainly make for a more pleasurable vacation, but there are things you can do while you are on your way that can make it even better.

    Sure, you can plan for the things you’re going to do on your vacation while you are travelling en route – but what about making use of that time for other things that you don’t usually do when you’re at home? You don’t need to have your gadgets with you to do it, and you can really connect with yourself if you take the time to manage your life while heading towards your vacation destination.

    Here are some great tips to help you with your time management while you travel, some of which are more conventional than others. Nonetheless, you can find out what works best for you and apply them accordingly depending on when and how you are travelling.

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    1. Take Your Time Getting There

    As I write this, I’m on a flight to San Francisco. Flying is the fastest way to get from place to place, and for many people it’s really the only way to travel.

    But I’ve often taken the train or ferry on trips so that I have extra time without distraction to get more done. I’m not worrying about navigation or lack of space to do what I want to do. Instead I’m able to focus on getting stuff done during the time I’ve got without feeling rushed. For example, when I took the train from Vancouver to Portland, it was an eight hour trip and I managed to get a ton of writing done and closed a lot of open loops. It also was less expensive than flying, which was a bonus.

    Sometimes taking the long way to get somewhere on vacation can be the best thing for you to get somewhere with your life.

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    2. Go Gadget-Free

    This is going to be a tough one for a lot of you. But why do you need to bring your gadgets with you when you go on vacation? It isn’t be a bad idea to leave all but one of them behind, and only pull out that one when you absolutely need to do so. In some countries, you’d be wise to be discreet with them anyway since flaunting them in front of those that are less fortunate than you isn’t a good practice. While it may not seem like flaunting to you, in different cultures it can definitely come across that way.

    If you can’t go gadget-free, then at least go Internet-free. If you use a task management app that requires syncing across your multiple devices to be effective, remember that if you only have the one device with you then it can be the “master device” for the time being and will store your data locally anyway. Just sync up when you get home.

    3. Reflect and Prepare

    Finally, going on any sort of excursion gives you the perfect opportunity to reflect on where you’ve been. The fact you have removed yourself from where you usually are can give you a perspective that you simply can’t get when you’re at home. You may want to journal your thoughts during this time – and by taking more time to get to your destination you’ll have more time to dig deeper into it.

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    After a period of reflection – however long that happens to be – you can then begin to not only prepare for the rest of your travels, you can prepare for the rest of what happens afterward. The reflection period is important, though. You need to really know where you’ve been in order to properly look at where you want to be. Time away from things gives you that chance.

    Conclusion

    Traveling isn’t always about where you’re going and how quickly you can get there. In fact, it’s rarely about that at all.

    More often it’s where you’re at in your head that will dictate how much you benefit from traveling. So don’t just go somewhere fast. Instead, take your time on the way there and take the time to connect with not only where you are but who are while you’re there.

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    If you do that, you’ll have a better chance to be who you want to be when you leave.

    Featured photo credit: bruce mars via unsplash.com

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