Advertising
Advertising

10 Reasons Why Hikers Are More Likely to Be Successful

10 Reasons Why Hikers Are More Likely to Be Successful

It is no longer news that hiking has many physical and emotional benefits. Even though millions of Americans and people worldwide know this, many do not see the importance of this kind of exercise. At a time when organizations are looking for ways to improve workplace productivity, develop leaders, and help employees work more efficiently, it is important to look beyond just the therapeutic benefits and discover how hikers are more likely to be successful.

1. They have lower stress levels

According to the president of the American Hiking society, “Being in nature is ingrained in our DNA, and we sometimes forget that.” People who hike are better able to deal with moods and are more positive, according to some studies. Hiking combats symptoms of stress and anxiety.

2. They have more endurance

Hiking has a way of testing our endurance and perseverance. If you are carrying a backpack while hiking, your body and mind are both challenged and improve their strength and endurance. Your body is pushed to its limits, and you are tested: will you turn back or keep going?

Advertising

3. They are healthier

According to a study done by Austrian researchers, hiking accomplished in different ways has different influences on the fats and sugars in the bloodstream. Additionally, hiking provides you with your daily dose of Vitamin D, lowers your risk of dying from cancer, alleviates your sleep, prevents and controls diabetes, and increases your bone density.

4. They have more energy

Hiking is an aerobic activity. Such activities bring extra oxygen and fuel to your muscles and other body tissues. This strengthens your muscles and lungs and, at the same time, increases your agility and alertness.

5. They are more focused

Hiking improves your focus, which is an important element of success. While hiking, you are able to get away from the distractions of technology and day-to-day life that can crush your spirit and weigh you down. Hikers have fewer distractions as they walk through nature. Their minds are cleared and their cognitive ability is improved.

Advertising

6. They are physically fit

One of the foremost benefits of hiking is the physical fitness attached to it. Success requires good health and physical fitness. Hiking keeps your weight under control and burns calories. At a slow pace of 2 miles per hour, a person who weighs 150 pounds can burn approximately 240 calories per hour.

7. They are independent

Hiking comes with responsibility. You cannot rely on technology; in fact, you may not even be familiar with the territory. With a heightened sense of responsibility, the hiker is forced to be self sufficient and independent, resilient and tough.

8. They are more creative

According to this study, backpackers scored 50% higher on a creativity test after spending four days in the great outdoors. Nature has a way of relaxing the mind and increasing your attention span by allowing you to rest, leaving much-needed room for reflection.

Advertising

9. They have an improved memory

Multitasking and regular day-to-day distractions have a way of impacting our brains negatively. Research shows that exposure to nature through hiking causes significant changes in the brain. Hiking lets you think more clearly, develop a greater focus and recall ability, and develops your cognitive skills.

10. They appreciate the simple things of life

For the hiker, it is not about the benefits or the rewards. Rather, it is about the experience of being close to nature, lost in a moment of discovery and adventuring to an unknown territory. This is what success means. And somewhere along this line, they value the simple provisions life has offered them.

Now that you know, will you take the extra effort and go on a hike?

Advertising

Featured photo credit: http://www.pixabay.com via pixabay.com

More by this author

Casey Imafidon

Specialized in motivation and personal growth, providing advice to make readers fulfilled and spurred on to achieve all that they desire in life.

10 Habits Of People Who Are Highly Successful At Work 8 Reasons Risk Takers Are More Likely To Be Successful 15 Signs Of Self-Absorbed People Master These 15 Skills for Success to Get Ahead in Your Career Follow This Simple Success Formula to Stop Feeling Stuck in Life

Trending in Productivity

1 What Am I Doing with My Life? Find Your Answer Here 2 How To Use Goals and Dreams To Achieve Personal Success 3 Easy Tasks or Difficult Tasks First? Which One is More Productive? 4 7 Reasons to Dare to Dream Big 5 Why You Need to Set Future Goals (And How to Reach Them)

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on June 2, 2020

Easy Tasks or Difficult Tasks First? Which One is More Productive?

Easy Tasks or Difficult Tasks First? Which One is More Productive?

Procrastination is probably the biggest detriment to our productivity. Conventional wisdom dictates that the best thing you can do is make that procrastination constructive. When you don’t feel like doing one task, usually one that requires a lot of will- or brainpower, you do another, usually less labor-intensive task.

Recently, though, conventional wisdom has been challenged with something Penn State refers to as “pre-crastination.”[1] After doing a series of studies in which students pick up and carry one of two buckets, researchers theorized that many people prefer to take care of difficult tasks sooner rather than later. That theory poses the question of whether this pre-crastination or the more widely acknowledged constructive procrastination is more effective.

Here is a look at whether people should do difficult tasks early or later on to achieve maximum productivity.

Advertising

Doing Easy Tasks First

The Pros

One of the hardest parts of working is just getting started. Constructive procrastination eases this hardship, because working on easy tasks requires a smaller mental or physical commitment than if you tackled difficult tasks firsts.

If one of the foremost deterrents to your productivity is simply getting going, it makes a lot of sense to save the difficult tasks for when you’re in more of a groove.

The Cons

If you eat a frog first thing in the morning, that will probably be the worst thing you do all day. — Mark Twain

On the surface, there don’t seem to necessarily be any disadvantages to doing easy tasks first. However, in Eat That Frog, the book writeen by Brian Tracy challenges that.

Based on the above quote from Mark Twain, Eat That Frog encourages avoiding procrastination, even if that procrastination is constructive. Tracy wants you to “eat that frog,” i.e. do your difficult tasks quickly because the longer it’s on your plate, the harder it will become to do the thing you’re dreading. If you have a habit of dreading things, Eat That Frog makes a solid argument to hold off on your easy tasks until later in the day.

Doing Difficult Tasks First

The Pros

Brian Tracy postulates in Eat That Frog that if you do your difficult tasks first, your other tasks won’t seem so bad. After all, after you eat a frog, even something unappetizing will seem downright delectable.

Advertising

Tracy also recommends that, if you have to eat two frogs, you should eat the uglier one first. The metaphor is a very easy way to get your head around the new concept of pre-crastination.

If all of your tasks seem somewhat torturous to you, you might be able to ease the pain by getting rid of the ugliest “toads” as quickly as you can.

The Cons

The primary disadvantage of doing your difficult tasks first is probably that it will make it especially hard to get started on your workday.

Advertising

A lot of people aren’t exactly at their peak performance mode when they enter the office. They need to ease into the workday, maybe have a cup or two of coffee to stimulate them.

If that’s you, doing your most difficult tasks first would probably be a costly mistake. Hold off on “eating those frogs” until you have the willpower and fortitude to choke them down.

Conclusion

Should you do easy or difficult tasks first? It seems like a cop-out to say that it depends on the person, but sometimes that’s the honest answer, and that is definitely the case here.

Advertising

Hopefully this article helps inform you of what type of worker you are, offering clues to whether you fall into the constructive procrastination or pre-crastination camps. Good luck on your pursuit of maximum productivity!

More Tips for Beating Procrastination

Featured photo credit: Courtney Dirks via flickr.com

Reference

Read Next