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10 Keys to Speed up Your Manifesting Process

10 Keys to Speed up Your Manifesting Process

Every moment we are conscious, we are creating. Whether we accept it or not, we are always co-creating with the Universe. Our beliefs, attitudes, the actions we take, the lens through which we look at life—it is all part of the creation process. The movie The Secret made the word “manifesting” popular. Many people have achieved magnificent results by visualizing and using some of the techniques discussed in the movie. Yet, some express difficulty even visualizing a positive outcome from where they stand. I have been around both kinds of people. Shaped by my personal experiences and extensive research on manifesting, I was able to put together ten ideas that can help speed up your manifesting process. Plant these ideas in your mind and let them grow into giant trees of consciousness.

Here we go!

1. Give yourself permission to want what you want.

As far as I know, the Universe has not provided us with a rule book that dictates when we deserve to hope for a raise, to make more money or to have the relationship we want. I am pretty sure that such a rule book does not exist. We decide what we deserve. No one else does. So, if you want to open up a glass blowing studio in Costa Rica, don’t wait for someone to tell you that you deserve to want it. I don’t believe that we can be given such a huge capacity to feel and be told not to want. Desire is the reason we do anything. And that’s how we are designed to live.

2. Be really willing to receive.

You might think, “Duh! Of course I want to receive it. I am asking for it, aren’t I?” Truthfully, that does not mean that you are willing to receive it into your life, heart and body. Look for and challenge limiting beliefs that could prevent you from being open to receiving what you desire. One way to accomplish this is by taking your dream all the way to the end, watching a movie of its highest potential in your mind (visualizing yourself living/having it) and seeing how far you allow yourself go in your mind until you start feeling undeserving or uncomfortable. Then look into the “why” and work with that.

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3. Be willing to doubt your doubts.

The truth is, the whole Universe is being managed while we are watching TV, shopping, making love and mowing the lawn. There are so many things in the Universe that work perfectly without us doing anything about it. We are not in charge of the weather, the sky, the oceans or earthquakes, yet we are gullible enough to not believe in miracles. The only limit is in our minds. Our conditioned, human minds. Just accepting this idea and reminding yourself of this fact will consistently help you wave away doubts.

4. Pick and choose who you share your dreams with.

There are people out there whose volunteer gig is dream-crushing. For whatever reason, they can’t go beyond their own conditioning of what can or cannot happen in life. If you are the kind of person who needs a lot of encouragement and gets easily affected by others’ negative comments, be very discretionary about who you share your goals, dreams and aspirations with, especially when they are in the gestation period. Protect the soil where you planted the seed for your dreams. Don’t let others’ hang ups about what is possible in life contaminate your vision.

5. Do your best to keep your vibration up.

Here is what’s real about life: we don’t feel happy all the time. Our emotional (vibrational) barometer doesn’t always point to Optimistic. Thankfully, there are many ways to raise your energy.

Giving ourselves and others compliments is a sure way to increase our vibration. If you are feeling low on happiness juice, compliment a mother for her baby’s cute outfit at the grocery store or visualize and appreciate a pet you adore. Develop a practice of stating good things that are true about you to yourself (even out loud), such as, “I love my toes. People love homemade lasagna. I am a good friend,” etc.

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What if it is a rough day and everything seems to be going wrong? Then accept it! Allow yourself to feel as crappy as you already do. Really. The energy of acceptance is much higher than the energy of resistance.

6. Take inspired action.

When it comes to “doing something” to move your dream along, the golden rule is to take inspired (in-spirit-ed) action. Meaning, staying open and alert to messages you receive from the Universe and following that fluttery feeling towards action that feels right. That inspired action sometimes comes as an unexpected nudge to call up a friend from college, who used to be very active in fundraising for nonprofits (if you are looking to start a nonprofit organization, for example). It is nice to have a plan and by any means, utilize plans in any way you can. Just don’t rely solely on your mind to manifest goodness in your life. Your intuitive guidance, when you are open to hearing it, will move you faster than you might imagine.

7. Strive to rise above jealousy.

Feeling jealous of someone’s awesome relationship, promotion or their new beautiful home is natural and human, but the quicker you move past that, the better it is for your manifestation process. When we feel jealous, our energy is invested in the scarcity side of the abundance continuum. It is a lower energy to try to manifest with. If you can, think about how their happiness effects the positive vibration in the Universe. Find some good aspects of them having it. If it seems like they are doing your thing, see that person as someone paving the way for you while making their own mistakes. Learn from them; don’t hate them.

8. Use a mantra to deal with your current less-than-ideal situation.

Remember that the small apartment, the dysfunctional relationship or the physical ailment that might be active in your life right now have helped you give birth to new desires.  Now, while you are in it, use mantras to open up your consciousness to possibilities.  For instance, if you are at a job where you feel under-appreciated and inadequately compensated, instead of saying “I hate this job,” say, “I prefer to work at a job where my skills are verbally and financially rewarded.” This way, you get to acknowledge the discomfort, but build a more hopeful and open language around it.

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9. Trust your soul’s path.

You are free to want what you want, and it does not make you less or more spiritual. Everyone’s goal is to be happy on their journey here. Is someone’s happy you’re happy? Some people want to have five kids and devote their life to their family. They are perfectly happy and fulfilled that way. Some people are destined to make a name for themselves by sharing who they are. We don’t know what anyone’s soul plan is and what they are here to learn.  Consider and even make peace with the idea that marrying a doctor or buying a summer house in the Hamptons may not be in your soul’s plan. Keep this in mind and still want what you want. Wanting something and being attached to it are not the same thing. Practice trusting the bigger plan.

10. Do your inner work.

Our core beliefs are like the gateway to our experience of life. Many beliefs are formed when we are too young to have the experience base to know or judge if those beliefs are facts. We didn’t have a choice in the matter as we were growing up. But now as adults, we have the power to upgrade our belief system, and thus, change our lives for the better. Look for outdated, limiting beliefs in an area of life where you could use an upgrade. Pay attention to your judgments. Especially about things like happy couples, rich people, skinny women, etc. Your awareness of your judgments will lead you to what your subconscious is holding. Challenge and clear up these outdated beliefs that you find.

 

We all deserve to feel good and manifest good things that make our path easier, smoother and more enjoyable. We are here to co-create with the Universe. We cannot control everything, but we can develop new perspectives that help the process to move along faster.

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Happy manifesting!

Featured photo credit: Dreaming by Moyer Brenn via flickr.com

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Last Updated on August 6, 2020

6 Reasons Why You Should Think Before You Speak

6 Reasons Why You Should Think Before You Speak

We’ve all done it. That moment when a series of words slithers from your mouth and the instant regret manifests through blushing and profuse apologies. If you could just think before you speak! It doesn’t have to be like this, and with a bit of practice, it’s actually quite easy to prevent.

“Think twice before you speak, because your words and influence will plant the seed of either success or failure in the mind of another.” – Napolean Hill

Are we speaking the same language?

My mum recently left me a note thanking me for looking after her dog. She’d signed it with “LOL.” In my world, this means “laugh out loud,” and in her world it means “lots of love.” My kids tell me things are “sick” when they’re good, and ”manck” when they’re bad (when I say “bad,” I don’t mean good!). It’s amazing that we manage to communicate at all.

When speaking, we tend to color our language with words and phrases that have become personal to us, things we’ve picked up from our friends, families and even memes from the internet. These colloquialisms become normal, and we expect the listener (or reader) to understand “what we mean.” If you really want the listener to understand your meaning, try to use words and phrases that they might use.

Am I being lazy?

When you’ve been in a relationship for a while, a strange metamorphosis takes place. People tend to become lazier in the way that they communicate with each other, with less thought for the feelings of their partner. There’s no malice intended; we just reach a “comfort zone” and know that our partners “know what we mean.”

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Here’s an exchange from Psychology Today to demonstrate what I mean:

Early in the relationship:

“Honey, I don’t want you to take this wrong, but I’m noticing that your hair is getting a little thin on top. I know guys are sensitive about losing their hair, but I don’t want someone else to embarrass you without your expecting it.”

When the relationship is established:

“Did you know that you’re losing a lot of hair on the back of your head? You’re combing it funny and it doesn’t help. Wear a baseball cap or something if you feel weird about it. Lots of guys get thin on top. It’s no big deal.”

It’s pretty clear which of these statements is more empathetic and more likely to be received well. Recognizing when we do this can be tricky, but with a little practice it becomes easy.

Have I actually got anything to say?

When I was a kid, my gran used to say to me that if I didn’t have anything good to say, I shouldn’t say anything at all. My gran couldn’t stand gossip, so this makes total sense, but you can take this statement a little further and modify it: “If you don’t have anything to say, then don’t say anything at all.”

A lot of the time, people speak to fill “uncomfortable silences,” or because they believe that saying something, anything, is better than staying quiet. It can even be a cause of anxiety for some people.

When somebody else is speaking, listen. Don’t wait to speak. Listen. Actually hear what that person is saying, think about it, and respond if necessary.

Am I painting an accurate picture?

One of the most common forms of miscommunication is the lack of a “referential index,” a type of generalization that fails to refer to specific nouns. As an example, look at these two simple phrases: “Can you pass me that?” and “Pass me that thing over there!”. How often have you said something similar?

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How is the listener supposed to know what you mean? The person that you’re talking to will start to fill in the gaps with something that may very well be completely different to what you mean. You’re thinking “pass me the salt,” but you get passed the pepper. This can be infuriating for the listener, and more importantly, can create a lack of understanding and ultimately produce conflict.

Before you speak, try to label people, places and objects in a way that it is easy for any listeners to understand.

What words am I using?

It’s well known that our use of nouns and verbs (or lack of them) gives an insight into where we grew up, our education, our thoughts and our feelings.

Less well known is that the use of pronouns offers a critical insight into how we emotionally code our sentences. James Pennebaker’s research in the 1990’s concluded that function words are important keys to someone’s psychological state and reveal much more than content words do.

Starting a sentence with “I think…” demonstrates self-focus rather than empathy with the speaker, whereas asking the speaker to elaborate or quantify what they’re saying clearly shows that you’re listening and have respect even if you disagree.

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Is the map really the territory?

Before speaking, we sometimes construct a scenario that makes us act in a way that isn’t necessarily reflective of the actual situation.

A while ago, John promised to help me out in a big way with a project that I was working on. After an initial meeting and some big promises, we put together a plan and set off on its execution. A week or so went by, and I tried to get a hold of John to see how things were going. After voice mails and emails with no reply and general silence, I tried again a week later and still got no response.

I was frustrated and started to get more than a bit vexed. The project obviously meant more to me than it did to him, and I started to construct all manner of crazy scenarios. I finally got through to John and immediately started a mild rant about making promises you can’t keep. He stopped me in my tracks with the news that his brother had died. If I’d have just thought before I spoke…

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