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10 Infographics That Will Help You Fall Asleep In 10 Minutes Tonight

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10 Infographics That Will Help You Fall Asleep In 10 Minutes Tonight

Feeling well-rested is crucial for your productivity and happiness, and a good night’s sleep can ensure you aren’t a miserable person to be around.

If you are experiencing feelings of grogginess more often than not, chances are your daily routine could be tuned up. The 10 infographic below can help you pinpoint potential problems and readjust so that sweet dreams come sooner.

How Much Sleep Do You Need Indeed?

    Lose Sleep, Lose Your Mind And Health

      Something Real Bad Will Happen On Your Brain…

        So What Should You Do To Sleep Well?

          How To Turn Your Bedroom Into A Sleep Cave

            Don’t Forget About The Good Bedtime Habits

              Good Night Drink For Better Sleep

                The Sleeping Position Matters Too

                  But What To Do When You Just Can’t Fall Asleep?

                    This Pretty Much Sums Up All The Tips About Sleep

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                      Last Updated on January 27, 2022

                      5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

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                      5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

                      Food plays an integral role in our lives and rightfully so: the food we eat is intricately intertwined with our culture. You can learn a lot about a particular culture by exploring their food. In fact, it may be difficult to fully define a culture without a nod to their cuisine.

                      “Tell me what you eat, and I’ll tell you who you are.” – Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1825).

                      Don’t believe me? Here’s why food is the best way to understand a culture:

                      Food is a universal necessity.

                      It doesn’t matter where in the world you’re from – you have to eat. And your societal culture most likely evolved from that very need, the need to eat. Once they ventured beyond hunting and gathering, many early civilizations organized themselves in ways that facilitated food distribution and production. That also meant that the animals, land and resources you were near dictated not only what you’d consume, but how you’d prepare and cook it. The establishment of the spice trade and the merchant silk road are two example of the great lengths many took to obtain desirable ingredients.

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                      Food preservation techniques are unique to climates and lifestyle.

                      Ever wonder why the process to preserve meat is so different around the world? It has to do with local resources, needs, and climates. In Morocco, Khlea is a dish composed of dried beef preserved in spices and then packed in animal fat. When preserved correctly, it’s still good for two years when stored at room temperature. That makes a lot of sense in Morocco, where the country historically has had a strong nomadic population, desert landscape, and extremely warm, dry temperatures.

                      Staples of a local cuisines illustrate historical eating patterns.

                      Some societies have cuisines that are entirely based on meat, and others are almost entirely plant-based. Some have seasonal variety and their cuisines change accordingly during different parts of the year. India’s cuisine is extremely varied from region to region, with meat and wheat heavy dishes in the far north, to spectacular fish delicacies in the east, to rice-based vegetarian diets in the south, and many more variations in between.

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                      The western part of India is home to a group of strict vegetarians: they not only avoid flesh and eggs, but even certain strong aromatics like garlic, or root vegetables like carrots and potatoes. Dishes like Papri Chat, featuring vegetable based chutneys mixed with yoghurt, herbs and spices are popular.

                      Components of popular dishes can reveal cultural secrets.

                      This is probably the most intriguing part of studying a specific cuisine. Certain regions of the world have certain ingredients easily available to them. Most people know that common foods such as corn, tomatoes, chili peppers, and chocolate are native to the Americas, or “New World”. Many of today’s chefs consider themselves to be extremely modern when fusing cuisines, but cultural lines blended long ago when it comes to purity of ingredients.

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                      Black pepper originated in Asia but became, and still remains, a critical part of European cuisine. The Belgians are some of the finest chocolatiers, despite it not being native to the old world. And perhaps one of the most interesting result from the blending of two cuisines is Chicken Tikka Masala; it resembles an Indian Mughali dish, but was actually invented by the British!

                      Food tourism – it’s a whole new way to travel.

                      Some people have taken the intergation of food and culture to a new level. No trip they take is complete with out a well-researched meal plan, that dictates not only the time of year for their visit, but also how they will experience a new culture.

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                      So, a food tourist won’t just focus on having a pint at Oktoberfest, but will be interested in learning the German beer making process, and possibly how they can make their own fresh brew. Food tourists visit many of the popular mainstays for traditional tourism, like New York City, San Francisco, London, or Paris, but many locations that they frequent, such as Armenia or Laos, may be off the beaten path for most travelers. And since their interest in food is more than meal deep, they have the chance to learn local preparation techniques that can shed insight into a whole other aspect of a particular region’s culture.

                      Featured photo credit: Young Shih via unsplash.com

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