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10 Brilliant Business Books You Can Read To Find Your Shortcut To Success

10 Brilliant Business Books You Can Read To Find Your Shortcut To Success

It’s a known fact that successful people read. Time and time again, successful entrepreneurs and business leaders cite frequent reading as one of their most important habits. If you’re looking for success in business and in life, these 10 brilliant business books can help you find your shortcut to success.

1. The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen R. Covey

7 Habits of Highly Effective People

    Get inspired and empowered with Covey’s classic book on achieving your goals. Each chapter explores a different habit aimed at helping you be the best, most effective person you can be for success in business and life. Read this if you’re ready to make powerful changes in your life to move you toward success.

    2. Zero to One by Peter Thiel

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    Zero to One

      Billionaire investor and entrepreneur Thiel offers deep and thought provoking insights on entrepreneurship and building value in the world in this modern classic. Read this to learn how great businesses are built and managed in today’s world.

      3. The 4-Hour Workweek by Tim Ferriss

      4 Hour Work Week

        With over a million copies sold worldwide, you’ve probably heard of ‘The 4-Hour Workweek’ before. In this powerful book Ferriss teaches you how to escape the 9-5, live anywhere, and join the new rich. This highly practical and informative read will have you looking at the world and the opportunities available to you in a whole new way. Read this if you’re ready to learn a new way of seeing the opportunities all around you.

        4. ‘Think and Grow Rich’ by Napoleon Hill

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        Think and Grow Rich

          Hill’s best seller has been one of the top-selling books of all time since it was first published in 1937. Read this if you’re ready to learn the secrets to success and wealth creation. Full of practical steps you can introduce in your life today. You won’t want to put this down till you’re done reading.

          5. ‘Who Moved My Cheese?’ by Spencer Johnson

          Who Moved My Cheese?

            For timeless lessons on how to let go of fear and embrace change, you can’t go past Johnson’s best selling classic ‘Who Moved My Cheese?’. Inside you’ll find powerful strategies for successfully dealing with changing times, all wrapped up in a deceptively simple story about two mice and two little humans stuck in a maze of moving cheese. Read this if you want to approach the changes in your life in a highly effective way.

            6. ‘The One Minute Manager’ by Kenneth Blanchard and Spencer Johnson

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            The One Minute Manager

              When it comes to learning the art of effective communication as a manager, you can’t go past ‘The One Minute Manager’. It’s full of expert advice on effective communication between managers and their employees. Read this if you’re a new manager, or a veteran who’s ready to uplevel the way you approach your employees,

              7. ‘The Richest Man in Babylon’ by George S. Clason

              The Richest Man in Babylon

                The ultimate guide to personal finance as told through a seemingly simple collection of parables set in the historical city of Babylon. Read this to learn the simple yet powerful principles of financial success like who to pay first in your business and investing in yourself above all else.

                8. ‘The Power of Habit’ by Charles Duhigg

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                The Power of Habit

                  Habits are powerful things, and nobody knows this better than Duhigg who shares the science of habit change in this remarkable book that will set you up for a lifetime of happiness and success. The big message here is that success begins with small changes in behaviour that you can start implementing right now.

                  9. ‘How to Win Friends & Influence People’ by Dale Carnegie

                  How to Win Friends and Influence People

                    In this classic best seller Carnegie takes you inside the psychology behind our daily interactions to show you how to become a leader and influencer in your field. Read this if you’re ready to step up to build purposeful and meaningful relationships to pave your way to success.

                    10. ‘Rich Habits: The Daily Success Habits of Wealthy Individuals’ by Thomas Corley

                    Rich Habits

                      Corley spent five years studying the lives of both rich and poor people to share the essential habits of both groups in this insightful book. This is a must read if you’re ready to learn the simple habits that could drastically impact your financial future.

                      Featured photo credit: Filling the frame, filling my life by Donnell King via flickr.com

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                      Last Updated on March 4, 2019

                      How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

                      How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

                      Many people will suggest that the best thing to do with your credit cards during these tough economic times is to cut them up with a pair of scissors. Indeed, if you are already in huge debt, you probably should stop using them and begin a payback strategy immediately. However, if you are not currently in trouble with your credit cards, there are wise ways to use them.

                      I happen to really love my credit cards so I will share with you my approach to how I use mine without getting into deep financial trouble.

                      Ever since about 1983 when I got my first Visa card, I continue to charge as many of my purchases as possible on credit. Everything from gas, groceries and monthly payments for services like my cable and home security monitoring are charged on credit. Despite my heavy usage, I have maintained the joy of never paying any interest fees at all on any of my credit cards.

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                      Here are some tips on how best to use your credit cards without falling into the trap of paying those nasty double-digit interest fees.

                      Do Not Treat Credit Cards as Your Funding Sources

                      Too many people treat their credit cards as funding sources for major purchases. Do not do this if you want to stay out of trouble. I use my credit cards as convenient financial instruments so I do not have to carry around much cash. In fact, I hate carrying cash, especially coins. When you buy things on credit, the purchases are clean and you will not get annoying coins back as change.

                      I do not rely on my Visa, MasterCard or American Express to fund any of my purchases, large or small. This brings me to my golden rule when it comes to whether I will pull out any of my credit cards either at a retail or online store.

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                      I never purchase anything with my credit cards if I do not have the actual cash on hand in my bank account.

                      If I really cannot pay for the item or service with cash that I already have at the bank, then I simply will not make the purchase. Remember, my credit cards are not used as funding sources. They are just convenient alternatives to actual cash in my pocket.

                      Make Sure to Always Pay Off Balances in Full Each Month

                      The next very important part of my overall strategy is to make absolutely sure that I pay the balances in full each and every month no matter how large they are. This should never be a problem if the cash has been budgeted for my purchases and secured in the bank. I have always paid my full balances each month ever since my very first credit card and this is why I never pay interest charges.

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                      Using Credit Cards with Rewards

                      Most of my credit cards are of the “no annual fees” type, including one MasterCard on a separate account I keep at home as a spare in case I lose my wallet or incur any fraudulent charges. However, I do use a main Visa card which does have an annual fee because all purchases on that card reward me with airline frequent flyer points. For me, the annual fee is worth it since I do travel and I get enough points to redeem many free flights.

                      You have to decide for yourself if you will charge enough purchases on credit each year without paying interest charges to warrant a credit card that rewards you with airline points (or other rewards). In my case, the answer is “yes” but that might not be the case for you.

                      I occasionally use a MasterCard or American Express card on small purchases just to keep those accounts active. Also, I have been to the odd retailer that accepted only a certain type of credit card, so I find that having one from each major company is quite handy. Aside from my main Visa card which earns the airline points, the rest of my cards are of the “no annual fees” variety.

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                      So this is how I use my credit cards without getting into any financial trouble with them. This strategy is recommended only if you are not in debt, of course. In fact, it is worth keeping in mind once you’re out of debt so that you can keep your credit cards active and treat them responsibly.

                      What are your credit card usage strategies? Let me know in the comments — I’d love to hear what methods you use.

                      Featured photo credit: Artem Bali via unsplash.com

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