Advertising

Top 10 Myths About Facebook

Advertising
Top 10 Myths About Facebook

The following article looks at 10 myths about Facebook and explains why they exist and what the reality is. As myths about Facebook go, most are built on widespread misconceptions or misunderstandings that many users hold. To bust these myths about Facebook read on…

10. Facebook is closing down

Facebook-haters like to spread the myth every few years that the site is closing. It is claimed that Mark Zuckerberg is overworked, has fallen out of love with Facebook and that the servers are overloaded. There is no evidence to back up these claims. In fact, since the IPO, it seems that this myth couldn’t be further from the truth.

Advertising

9. Friends’ acquaintances can see your timeline

This myth has been perpetuated a lot on the Facebook site itself. You may see this in the form of a chain post which encourages you to share with your friends. The myth states that if you post a comment on someones wall that their friends can automatically see your private status updates. This is plainly wrong and should be ignored.

8. Friends can tell that you’ve looked at their timeline

You are able to spend time using Facebook safe in the knowledge that others aren’t aware of where you are looking. This works two ways, so you cannot tell who has looked at your timeline and as a consequence, you need to pick your friends carefully.

Advertising

7. Facebook is free

Whilst you may not exchange money for using the site, you end up paying with information. Effectively you trade information about you and your relationships for the ability to use the site. The more you put in, the better Facebook understands you. The better understood you are, the better the ads that can be served to you. Better ads mean better click through, which in turn drives profits. As myths about Facebook go this is pretty high on the list of things to be aware of. This enables you as a user to better understand the relationship you have with the site.

6. Using Facebook is a waste of time

One of the big myths about Facebook is that using it is a waste of time. Sure, you can idle away your days stalking friends and family, but it can also be put to good use. Facebook excels at keeping people in touch. Now that so many people use Facebook, you can find long-lost friends, keep in touch with relatives abroad and keep up to date with things like the latest baby photos. This virtual connection often facilitates meeting up in person.

Advertising

5. The kids don’t use Facebook

There’s lots written about how Facebook is being deserted by youngsters. Whilst the average age of users may be going up, there are still massive amounts of connected under-25s using Facebook. Don’t just take my word for it; if you have relatives that are younger and on Facebook, then have a look at how much they use the site. The youth may be a little less engaged than they were, but you will no doubt see that they are as engaged as your average friend.

4. Your friends can see everything you post

It used to be that when you wrote a post all of your friends would see it. This was good in that you got your messages out there, but could get a little noisy if you were friends with lots of people. Nowadays, your posts get sorted by an algorithm which promote the more popular content. So if you are the kind of person that gets lots of comments, then expect people to be able to see what you are writing. However if your posts incite tumbleweed, then don’t be surprised if fewer people know about what is going on in your life.

Advertising

3. Facebook will be around forever

Whilst Facebook has the largest quantity of users for a social network, what it does can be replicated and improved upon. Other social networking communities like Google+, Twitter and Snapchat all have the ability to take away attention from Facebook. Without people actively engaged with the site, Facebook could lose some of its advertising revenue and fade away. MySpace (and countless sites before it) prove that something that is big news today can become unimportant tomorrow. So for Facebook to be around tomorrow, it needs to continually innovate and develop new features that benefit both users and advertisers. If it can manage to do this, then Facebook wont be going away any time soon.

2. 10,000 people will come to your party if you publish it publicly

A story that keeps resurfacing time and time again is that if you have a party and advertise it publicly, then expect it to end in a riot. It is a good idea to be mindful of who you invite where, but you need to be particularly lucky / unlucky for your invitation to go viral and get the kind of attention needed for 10,000 people to turn up at your doorstep. Instead, you are likely to get a bunch of people you do not know turning up, which you may regret as they probably give no thought to you or your property.

Advertising

1. Facebook is private

Perhaps one of the slightly more worrying myths about Facebook is that it is private. If you do not change your privacy settings then some, if not all, of your Facebook posts are public. New users to Facebook are often unaware of this and use the site like only their friends can see what hey are doing. Anyone who wishes to keep their privacy intact whilst using Facebook should follow the advice given in this article on how to lock down their settings.

Missed any?

Please get in touch and let me know if you think I’ve missed any myths about Facebook you think should be included in this article.

More by this author

Less is More 10 tips for developing your writing Less Is More: 10 Writing Tips To Help You Develop Your Writing Things People With Remarkable Willpower Do Differently 10 Things People With Remarkable Willpower Do Differently gadget for the beach 6 Brilliant Ways To Prepare Your Gadget For The Beach This Summer Stop Making Excuses For Not Backing Up Your Computer Stop Making Excuses For Not Backing Up Your Computer 9 Ways to Get Into Debt How You Easily Get Into Debt

Trending in Technology

1 How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private 2 20 Must-Have iPad Apps /iPhone Apps That You May Be Missing 3 Finally, 20 Productivity Apps That Will Ensure Efficiency 4 8 Useful Apps Every Learner Should Not Miss 5 Protecting Your Online Life With Secure Passwords

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on November 25, 2021

How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

Advertising
How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

    What Does Private Browsing Do?

    When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

    For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

    Advertising

    The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

    The Terminal Archive

    While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

    Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

    dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

    Advertising

    Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

    Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

    However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

    Clearing Your Tracks

    Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

    Advertising

    dscacheutil -flushcache

    As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

    Other Browsers and Private Browsing

    Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

    If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

    Advertising

    As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

    Read Next