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Top 9 Apps for Getting Through School

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Top 9 Apps for Getting Through School

It’s the digital age we’re living in, and the amount of information the average person deals with daily is impressive. But it does not have to be difficult. Technology is here to help us climb these mountains of data! Computers and tablets, as well as other gadgets and devices, have become increasingly popular in education, researching and essay writing. It is not just students who try to make use of their androids and iPads in class – many schools and universities are trying to tap the potential that the digital assistants are offering to us. Here’s a quick review of ten useful apps that will make your school days easier and more enjoyable.

Mathway

Mathway is an irreplaceable tool when it comes to problem solving. The app helps you do your maths homework. Not only does it do your assignment for you, it teaches you how to do it right. All you have to do is put the equation in and press the Enter button.

Mathway

    LiveMocha

    LiveMocha is a social network for those who are learning languages. You help other people get insights into your native tongue, and they teach you their language. You can even ask your LiveMocha friends to help you with your homework. Nothing wrong with that.

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    LiveMocha

      Delicious

      Delicious is the popular online bookmarking tool, which lets you organize your project material under a single tab. Delicious can be your 21st century personal library for the webpages that you find online.

      Delicious

        Evernote

        Evernote lets you save images, video and audio files from the web. Essentially, the tool turns everything you find on the web into notes. You can share your notes and sync them with your smartphone. There are many benefits from using Evernote on a regular basis, the major one is that the stuff you save can be later used for school projects. It supports a variety of platforms, including major operating systems (excluding linux) and virtuall all mobile ones.

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        Evernote

          EasyBib

          EasyBib does the bibliography for you. Not many students are aware of the fact that such an online tool exists. It wouldn’t be a bad idea to try it once and show your bibliography to your professor. Just to be on the safe side – you never know whether they are up to date with the latest formatting style requirements.

          EasyRib

            CiteMe

            CiteMe is a Facebook app that will help you get formatted citations from WorldCat, the world’s largest library catalog.

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            CiteMe

              GradeMate

              GradeMate helps you know what final grade you are getting. The app describes itself as “a resource that helps teachers spend less time on administrative tasks and more time with their students”. You simply note all the grades you are getting throughout the class, and the tool will predict the final result. You will also need to put in the value (i.e. percent of the final grade) of each assignment.

              GradeMate

                SlideRocket

                SlideRocket lets you create awesome and professional looking presentations. It has a vast library of the graphic and audio materials. It would be hard to find those on the web. SlideRocket helps you put them into your presentation.

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                SlideRocket

                  Empressr

                  Empressr is a yet another tool for creating media-rich presentations. Every online presentation creator has their own set of unique media materials and themes. If you can’t find what you are looking for, it might be smart to use several ones at the same time, and then put the presentations together.

                  While apps can be helpful it is wise not to rely on them all the time. It is better to use them only when it’s really necessary and not every time you need them. Otherwise, you might become too dependent on them and will not be able to do even the simplest things on your own. Just ask yourself what happens if the power goes out? But the power is there for now, and it’s nice to have these time-savers at hand.

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                  Top 9 Apps for Getting Through School

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                  Last Updated on November 25, 2021

                  How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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                  How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

                  There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

                  Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

                    What Does Private Browsing Do?

                    When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

                    For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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                    The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

                    The Terminal Archive

                    While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

                    Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

                    dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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                    Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

                    Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

                    However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

                    Clearing Your Tracks

                    Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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                    dscacheutil -flushcache

                    As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

                    Other Browsers and Private Browsing

                    Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

                    If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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                    As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

                    Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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