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10 Pro Secrets To Have Memorable Presentations

10 Pro Secrets To Have Memorable Presentations

Great presentations are memorable, instructive and referenced for many years. Great presentations encourage and educate audiences. Most successful public speakers have refined their skills to deliver memorable presentations in front of a live audience. Here is a summary of the process to make your next presentation one your audience will never forget.

1. Show confidence

If you’re worried or nervous, to counteract your anxiety, show fictitious self-assurance. Stand up unconventionally, show a nice smile and strengthen your mindset with positive considerations. While giving or preparing for a presentation always remember the five P’s: prior planning prevents poor performance. The more you exercise, the more confident you will feel when giving presentations in front of the audience.

2. Make connections

Making connections with the audience can greatly help you in having memorable presentations. Be interactive by looking at the entire audience during your presentation. Smile at an unfamiliar person in the audience. Your subtle signals will make the presentation more like a conversation between associates than a formal presentation.

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3. Introduce yourself memorably

If you are going to give a presentation at an event, the organizer will most likely introduce you before your presentation. But don’t hinge on the organizer to endear you to the audience. Before you start your presentation, introduce yourself with one or two quick verdicts. Avoid repeating your resume for the introduction; instead, quickly inform your audience who you are and why they should pay attention to what you have to say.

4. Stay accessible

Select a social medium to connect with the people during and after the presentation. In social media, Twitter is a widespread choice because audience members might want to tweet something interesting or profound they have found in your presentation. As an alternative, you can either share your blog, website or email address.

5. Tell stories

Every Tom, Dick and Harry love a great story. Great presentations are not rational speeches; they feel like emotional descriptions conveyed in a sensational and engaging way. Engage and involve your audience by sharing information in the form of a story. Support your presentation with personal experiences, obstacles and achievements to exemplify your points.

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6. Practice delivery

A memorable presentation is so appealing that it makes the presenter forget about himself and become captivated in the presentation. Rehearse your presentation over and over until you remove the interference including nerviness and prickly gaps. Pay full attention to your body language. Great presenters work this phase in a usual way.

7. Speak the language

Great presentations don’t leave people pondering what you have said in the presentation. It might be appealing to say a few big words, but it would make your audience feel estranged. Always clarify terms, abbreviations and contractions.

8. Deep research

Having a memorable presentation that will never vanish from the minds of the audience, requires more than the usual information given in your presentation. Do deep research and find some significant fact beyond your topic. Give them the unexpected. Ambiguous and opposing information will raise heads and encourage discussion.

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9. Simple slides

Be careful about your presentation content. If you want your presentation to be unforgettable, don’t be like everyone else. Use simple slides in your presentation to highlight and emphasize key points.

10. Conclude with a call to action

Concluding with a call to action is something your audience can do immediately. Memorable presentations are inspiring, but people face hitches to apply that knowledge to their daily lives. To leave a sense of obligation share the results of your experience, victories and achievements. Inform your audience precisely how they can achieve similar outcomes.

Confidence, preparation and great listening skills are compulsory to end a fabulous and memorable presentation. “Always speak from the heart and tell the truth; it will delight some and surprise the rest.”

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Featured photo credit: brightcarbon.com via brightcarbon.com

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Published on July 17, 2018

How Productive People Compartmentalize Time to Get the Most Done

How Productive People Compartmentalize Time to Get the Most Done

I’ve never believed people are born productive or organized. Being organized and productive is a choice.

You choose to keep your stuff organized or you don’t. You choose to get on with your work and ignore distractions or you don’t.

But one skill very productive people appear to have that is not a choice is the ability to compartmentalize. And that takes skill and practice.

What is compartmentalization

To compartmentalize means you have the ability to shut out all distractions and other work except for the work in front of you. Nothing gets past your barriers.

In psychology, compartmentalization is a defence mechanism our brains use to shut out traumatic events. We close down all thoughts about the traumatic event. This can lead to serious mental-health problems such as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) if not dealt with properly.

However, compartmentalization can be used in positive ways to help us become more productive and allow us to focus on the things that are important to us.

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Robin Sharma, the renowned leadership coach, calls it his Tight Bubble of Total Focus Strategy. This is where he shuts out all distractions, turns off his phone and goes to a quiet place where no one will disturb him and does the work he wants to focus on. He allows nothing to come between himself and the work he is working on and prides himself on being almost uncontactable.

Others call it deep work. When I want to focus on a specific piece of work, I turn everything off, turn on my favourite music podcast The Anjunadeep Edition (soft, eclectic electronic music) and focus on the content I intend to work on. It works, and it allows me to get massive amounts of content produced every week.

The main point about compartmentalization is that no matter what else is going on in your life — you could be going through a difficult time in your relationships, your business could be sinking into bankruptcy or you just had a fight with your colleague; you can shut those things out of your mind and focus totally on the work that needs doing.

Your mind sees things as separate rooms with closable doors, so you can enter a mental room, close the door and have complete focus on whatever it is you want to focus on. Your mind does not wander.

Being able to achieve this state can seriously boost your productivity. You get a lot more quality work done and you find you have a lot more time to do the things you want to do. It is a skill worth mastering for the benefits it will bring you.

How to develop the skill of compartmentalization

The simplest way to develop this skill is to use your calendar.

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Your calendar is the most powerful tool you have in your productivity toolbox. It allows you to block time out, and it can focus you on the work that needs doing.

My calendar allows me to block time out so I can remove everything else out of my mind to focus on one thing. When I have scheduled time for writing, I know what I want to write about and I sit down and my mind completely focuses on the writing.

Nothing comes between me, my thoughts and the keyboard. I am in my writing compartment and that is where I want to be. Anything going on around me, such as a problem with a student, a difficulty with an area of my business or an argument with my wife is blocked out.

Understand that sometimes there’s nothing you can do about an issue

One of the ways to do this is to understand there are times when there is nothing you can do about an issue or an area of your life. For example, if I have a student with a problem, unless I am able to communicate with that student at that specific time, there is nothing I can do about it.

If I can help the student, I would schedule a meeting with the student to help them. But between now and the scheduled meeting there is nothing I can do. So, I block it out.

The meeting is scheduled on my calendar and I will be there. Until then, there is nothing I can do about it.

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Ask yourself the question “Is there anything I can do about it right now?”

This is a very powerful way to help you compartmentalize these issues.

If there is, focus all your attention on it to the exclusion of everything else until you have a workable solution. If not, then block it out, schedule time when you can do something about it and move on to the next piece of work you need to work on.

Being able to compartmentalize helps with productivity in another way. It reduces the amount of time you spend worrying.

Worrying about something is a huge waste of energy that never solves anything. Being able to block out issues you cannot deal with stops you from worrying about things and allows you to focus on the things you can do something about.

Reframe the problem as a question

Reframing the problem as a question such as “what do I have to do to solve this problem?” takes your mind away from a worried state into a solution state, where you begin searching for solutions.

One of the reasons David Allen’s Getting Things Done book has endured is because it focuses on contexts. This is a form of compartmentalization where you only do work you can work on.

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For instance, if a piece of work needs a computer, you would only look at the work when you were in front of a computer. If you were driving, you cannot do that work, so you would not be looking at it.

Choose one thing to focus on

To get better at compartmentalizing, look around your environment and seek out places where you can do specific types of work.

Taking your dog for a walk could be the time you focus solely on solving project problems, commuting to and from work could be the time you spend reading and developing your skills and the time between 10 am and 12 pm could be the time you spend on the phone sorting out client issues.

Once you make the decision about when and where you will do the different types of work, make it stick. Schedule it. Once it becomes a habit, you are well on your way to using the power of compartmentalization to become more productive.

Comparmentalization saves you stress

Compartmentalization is a skill that gives you time to deal with issues and work to the exclusion of all other distractions.

This means you get more work done in less time and this allows you to spend more time with the people you want to spend more time with, doing the things you want to spend more time doing.

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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