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10 Pro Secrets To Have Memorable Presentations

10 Pro Secrets To Have Memorable Presentations

Great presentations are memorable, instructive and referenced for many years. Great presentations encourage and educate audiences. Most successful public speakers have refined their skills to deliver memorable presentations in front of a live audience. Here is a summary of the process to make your next presentation one your audience will never forget.

1. Show confidence

If you’re worried or nervous, to counteract your anxiety, show fictitious self-assurance. Stand up unconventionally, show a nice smile and strengthen your mindset with positive considerations. While giving or preparing for a presentation always remember the five P’s: prior planning prevents poor performance. The more you exercise, the more confident you will feel when giving presentations in front of the audience.

2. Make connections

Making connections with the audience can greatly help you in having memorable presentations. Be interactive by looking at the entire audience during your presentation. Smile at an unfamiliar person in the audience. Your subtle signals will make the presentation more like a conversation between associates than a formal presentation.

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3. Introduce yourself memorably

If you are going to give a presentation at an event, the organizer will most likely introduce you before your presentation. But don’t hinge on the organizer to endear you to the audience. Before you start your presentation, introduce yourself with one or two quick verdicts. Avoid repeating your resume for the introduction; instead, quickly inform your audience who you are and why they should pay attention to what you have to say.

4. Stay accessible

Select a social medium to connect with the people during and after the presentation. In social media, Twitter is a widespread choice because audience members might want to tweet something interesting or profound they have found in your presentation. As an alternative, you can either share your blog, website or email address.

5. Tell stories

Every Tom, Dick and Harry love a great story. Great presentations are not rational speeches; they feel like emotional descriptions conveyed in a sensational and engaging way. Engage and involve your audience by sharing information in the form of a story. Support your presentation with personal experiences, obstacles and achievements to exemplify your points.

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6. Practice delivery

A memorable presentation is so appealing that it makes the presenter forget about himself and become captivated in the presentation. Rehearse your presentation over and over until you remove the interference including nerviness and prickly gaps. Pay full attention to your body language. Great presenters work this phase in a usual way.

7. Speak the language

Great presentations don’t leave people pondering what you have said in the presentation. It might be appealing to say a few big words, but it would make your audience feel estranged. Always clarify terms, abbreviations and contractions.

8. Deep research

Having a memorable presentation that will never vanish from the minds of the audience, requires more than the usual information given in your presentation. Do deep research and find some significant fact beyond your topic. Give them the unexpected. Ambiguous and opposing information will raise heads and encourage discussion.

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9. Simple slides

Be careful about your presentation content. If you want your presentation to be unforgettable, don’t be like everyone else. Use simple slides in your presentation to highlight and emphasize key points.

10. Conclude with a call to action

Concluding with a call to action is something your audience can do immediately. Memorable presentations are inspiring, but people face hitches to apply that knowledge to their daily lives. To leave a sense of obligation share the results of your experience, victories and achievements. Inform your audience precisely how they can achieve similar outcomes.

Confidence, preparation and great listening skills are compulsory to end a fabulous and memorable presentation. “Always speak from the heart and tell the truth; it will delight some and surprise the rest.”

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Featured photo credit: brightcarbon.com via brightcarbon.com

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Tayyab Babar

Tayyab is a PR/Marketing consultant. He writes about work, productivity and tech tips at Lifehack.

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Last Updated on May 22, 2019

The Pomodoro Technique: Is It Right for You to Boost Productivity?

The Pomodoro Technique: Is It Right for You to Boost Productivity?

If you spend any time at all researching life hacks, you’ve probably heard of the famous Pomodoro Technique.

Created in the 1980s by Francesco Cirillo, the Pomodoro Technique is one of the more popular time management life hacks used today. But this method isn’t for everyone, and for every person who is a passionate adherent of the system, there is another person who is critical of the results.

Is the Pomodoro Technique right for you? It’s a matter of personal preference. But if you are curious about the benefits of using the technique, this article will break down the basic information you will need to decide if this technique is worth trying out.

What is the Pomodoro Technique?

The Pomodoro Technique is a time management philosophy that aims to provide the user with maximum focus and creative freshness, thereby allowing them to complete projects faster with less mental fatigue.

The process is simple:

For every project throughout the day, you budget your time into short increments and take breaks periodically.

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You work for 25 minutes, then take break for five minutes.

Each 25-minute work period is called a “pomodoro”, named after the Italian word for tomato. Francesco Cirillo used a kitchen timer shaped like a tomato as his personal timer, and thus the method’s name.

After four “pomodoros” have passed, (100 minutes of work time with 15 minutes of break time) you then take a 15-20 minute break.

Every time you finish a pomodoro, you mark your progress with an “X”, and note the number of times you had the impulse to procrastinate or switch gears to work on another task for each 25-minute chunk of time.

How the Pomodoro Technique boosts your productivity

Frequent breaks keep your mind fresh and focused. According to the official Pomodoro website, the system is easy to use and you will see results very quickly:

“You will probably begin to notice a difference in your work or study process within a day or two. True mastery of the technique takes from seven to twenty days of constant use.”

If you have a large and varied to-do list, using the Pomodoro Technique can help you crank through projects faster by forcing you to adhere to strict timing.

Watching the timer wind down can spur you to wrap up your current task more quickly, and spreading a task over two or three pomodoros can keep you from getting frustrated.

The constant timing of your activities makes you more accountable for your tasks and minimizes the time you spend procrastinating.

You’ll grow to “respect the tomato”, and that can help you to better handle your workload.

Successful people who love it

Steven Sande of The Unofficial Apple Weblog is a fan of the system, and has compiled a great list of Apple-compatible Pomodoro tools.

Before he started using the technique, he said,

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“Sometimes I couldn’t figure out how to organize a single day in my calendar, simply because I would jump around to all sorts of projects and never get even one of them accomplished.”

Another proponent of the Pomodoro Technique is Sue Shellenbarger of the Wall Street Journal. Shellenbarger tried out this system along with several other similar methods for time management, and said,

“It eased my anxiety over the passing of time and also made me more efficient; refreshed by breaks, for example, I halved the total time required to fact-check a column.”

Any cons for the Pomodoro Technique?

Despite the number of Pomodoro-heads out there, the system isn’t without its critics. Colin T. Miller, a Yahoo! employee and blogger, tried using the Pomodoro Technique and had some issues:[1]

“Pomodoros are an all or nothing affair. Either you work for 25 minutes straight to mark your X or you don’t complete a pomodoro. Since marking that X is the measurable sign of progress, you start to shy away from engaging in an activity if it won’t result in an X. For instance…meetings get in the way of pomodoros. Say I have a meeting set for 4:30pm. It is currently 4:10pm, meaning I only have 20 minutes between now and the meeting…In these instances I tend to not start a pomodoro because I won’t have enough time to complete it anyway.”

Another critic is Mario Fusco, who argues that the Pomodoro Technique is…well…sort of ridiculous:[2]

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“Aren’t we really able to keep ourselves concentrated without a timer ticketing on our desk?… Have you ever seen a civil engineer using a timer to keep his concentration while working on his projects?… I think that, like any other serious professional, I can stay concentrated on what I am doing for hours… Bring back your timer to your kitchen and start working in a more professional and effective way.”

Conclusion

One of the best things about the Pomodoro Technique is that it’s free. Yeah, you can fork over some bills to get a tomato-shaped timer if you want… or you can use any timer program on your computer or phone. So even if you try it and hate it, you haven’t lost any cash.

The process isn’t ideal for every person, or in any line of work. But if you need a systematic way to tackle your daily to-do list, the Pomodoro Technique may fit your needs.

If you want to learn more about the Pomodoro Technique, check out this article: How to Make the Pomodoro Technique More Productive

Reference

[1] Aspirations of a Software Developer: A Month of the Pomodoro Technique
[2] InfoQ: A Critique of the Pomodoro Technique

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