While experts found that recent growth in the UK labor market may be about to stagnate, the national rate of unemployment fell to a respectable 7.2% last month. This is primarily considered to be the result of a wider economic recovery. It also reflects trends that are unfolding in developed nations throughout the world.

In addition to an improving climate, however, there are factors that have helped connect job seekers with the employment market. One of the most prominent is the rise of online and mobile recruitment techniques, which are becoming widely used and remain popular among more than 86% of job seekers.

Given the fact that online recruitment remains a relatively new practice, job seekers continue to make mistakes when searching and applying for roles. These can have a detrimental impact on your chances of finding work, consider the following before you begin to reach out towards e-recruitment websites:

1. Recycling the Same Cover Letter for Every Application

The online realm is a deceptively compact space, where professionals interact on a daily basis. With this in mind, it is a strong possibility that online recruitment firms share information on potential candidates, which in turn can highlight inconsistencies in your resume or the use of a standardized cover letter across multiple applications. The latter can be detrimental to the pursuit of any job, as it suggests that you do little to distinguish between individual roles of employment prior to making contact.

2. Not Researching Individual Employers and Businesses

There is a certain transparency about job hunting online, as roles are advertised complete with a detailed description, directions, and information concerning annual remuneration. While this can help you make an informed decision when considering applications, it is important not to become complacent and neglect the importance of researching every potential employer. By delving beneath the surface of a job description and considering the philosophy of the firm in question, you can accurately determine whether or not it is the right option for you.

3. Letting Greed Dictate Your Job Choice

On a similar note, it is easy to lose sight of your motivation to work when viewing a high volume of potential opportunities. By becoming too regimented in your approach and listing jobs in terms of salary, for example, you are allowing yourself to be driven by greed rather than considering other important factors such as job security, long-term prospects, and the potential for progression. Before you turn away any application, take time to remember your priorities and consider whether the job in question will enable you to achieve your professional and personal goals.

4. Failing to Apply Because You Don’t Consider Yourself a Good Match for the Role

Occasionally, you find an online opportunity appealing, only to be deterred from applying because you lack a specific qualification or relevant experience. This is a huge mistake, as you may have compensating factors that make you a viable candidate for the role. It is better to let professional recruiters do their job and make an informed decision, rather than limiting your opportunities because of perceived inadequacies.

5. Applying for Jobs Without Genuine Understanding of the Role

On the flip-side, it is important that you have some understanding of any potential job before you apply. If you lack any of the required qualifications or are unable to showcase relevant experience as demanded by the employer, you may need to exercise your better judgement and find a more suitable role. Otherwise, you run the risk of wasting everyone’s time and potentially damaging your credibility as a candidate.

6. Showing Frustration Online

Whether you have been unemployed for a single day or an entire year, hunting for jobs online can be extremely frustrating. Recruitment firms are not always proactive when providing information about a specific application; while potential employers can take a great deal of time when making a final decision. You cannot afford to manifest your negative emotions through online communications. This will discourage recruiters from working with you and ultimately hinder your chances of impressing employers.

7. Letting Pride Get in the Way of a Good Job

While the employment market has experienced genuine growth in recent times, there are industries that have been hit hard by previous recessions and due to the advent of technology. If you find yourself out of work due to a decline within your industry, be willing to start again and perhaps re-enter the employment market by accepting a low-paid, temporary position if necessary. If pride prevents you from taking such a step, you may find yourself out of work for a prolonged period of time.

8. Failing to Market Yourself or Skills

Thanks to professional networking tools, it is possible to use social media as a way of engaging potential employers and thought leaders within your chosen industry. These tools provide a platform from which you can market yourself and unique skills, whether academic accreditations or characteristics that help you to stand out from the crowd. If you are not proactive in showcasing and marketing these skills, you will lose out to more aggressive candidates who are willing to promote themselves.

9. Creating a Bland or Generic Resume

While there may only be a set number of formats that you can use when creating your resume, it is crucial that its content is concise, informative, and details the value that you can bring to a company. If you are unable to achieve this, you will be left with a bland and meaningless resume that fails to hold the attention of recruiters and employers. Avoid including mundane and irrelevant information, and refrain from extending your resume over four or five pages.

10. Failing to Regulate Your Social Media

Although the principles of social media and professional networking can be used to showcase your credibility as a candidate, there are also pitfalls to using an online and real-time medium. This is especially true with resources such as Twitter, where the lines between professional and personal can become blurred over time. It is crucial that you regulate your output on social media, while also preventing friends from referencing you in relation to inappropriate content.

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