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The 10 Most (And Least) Expensive States In America

The 10 Most (And Least) Expensive States In America

2017 cost-of-living index figures by C2ER (Council for Community and Economic Research) are fresh out of the oven. Well, despite continued widespread recovery tactics, where you live in America has a great deal of impact on what economic challenges you face. No country is immune from economic slumps but higher than average state autonomy in America means economic growth varies by state. While one might expect to see California and New York on the list of most expensive states in America, shifting economic landscapes make several unexpected states more expensive as well. Complicated economic factors, as well as public officials struggling to meet the challenges of the future, make these ten states the most expensive and most affordable in America.

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    Most Expensive States

    1. Hawaii

    Take palm-fringed, sandy beaches, sizzling cultural melt, and add incredibly beautiful flora and fauna – and that’s the ‘magical’ allure of Hawaii. All these goodies, however, come with a steep price. Looking to buy a home in Hawaii? That’ll set you back a whopping $1 million on average. And that isn’t all – it’ll cost you nearly$3000 to rent a two-bedroom apartment and the monthly energy bill is estimated at $455.51, a figure that’s about 3 times what you’d shed in some leafy suburbs of California. But you live in Hawaii, the Aloha State!

    2. New York

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    Chiming at the second place is the Empire State. That in and of itself isn’t surprising at all in a state where the average home goes for $1.6 million (yes, you read that right). Looking to rent? Forget about it; a cozy two-bedroom apartment averages $4200 in monthly rent. Of course, New York is vast and uneven recovery/growth is partly to blame. Despite the improvement in unemployment rates since the end recession, New York continues to battle with aging infrastructure and starkly different growth rates. But there are areas like Rochester (average home price is $287000) where life is surprisingly easier than Manhattan. Nonetheless, you will still shed more than $160 for monthly energy bill there.

    3. California

    Not surprisingly, California is also one of the most expensive states in America. High housing costs in this state have long made it one of the pricier states, but population growth is another concern. At around $1 million, the average price of a home in metro San Francisco is the 3rd highest nationwide. California is also the number one state for poverty, reportedly carrying $1.6 billion in debt. While the state holds only 12% of the American population, nearly 33% of all welfare recipients are Californian.

    4. Massachusetts

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    It’s official – it’s now more expensive to live in Massachusetts than Alaska! The cost of groceries is through the roof, with 24-ounce T-bone steak going for more than $62! While the average price of a home is $634,233, expect to pay 3 or even 5 more times in most Newton, Framingham, and Cambridge neighborhoods. At $2668, the average rent for a sweet two-bedroom apartment in Boston is the 4th highest in the US. And the energy bill of $287.63 is close to $100 more than would be in Anchorage.

    5. Alaska

    A newcomer to this list, Alaska – the moose state – offers unsurpassed natural beauty and close-knit culture you’ll never find elsewhere. With only 760 farms, it’s no surprise that most produce and food items are hauled from different states. And that trickles down to tons of other costs. A loaf of bread which goes for a mere $1.79 in Iowa will set you back $4.68 in Anchorage. But again, this is Alaska – the land of amazing wildlife. Paying utility bills ($201.39 for energy) and healthcare isn’t a walk in the park either.

    Least Expensive States

    1. Mississippi

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    One of the less densely populated states, Mississippi is one of the least expensive states to live in. With low per capita income, the state’s housing costs remain correspondingly low as well (the average home price of $199,028), making the cost of living affordable. Mississippi previously relied mainly on cotton production to drive the economy. In the last two decades or so, however, Mississippi has diversified agricultural and livestock industries, ensuring economic growth. Now focusing on producing rice, soybeans, chicken, and catfish, Mississippi continues to pursue diversification to enrich its economy, a strategy which has been successful so far.

    2. Indiana

    Next up, is Indiana, a state famous for the Indianapolis 500 and low-cost homes (averaged at $270,204). At the Crossroads of America, you can expect rock-bottom prices for groceries and other basic food items. A head of lettuce goes for a paltry $1.04 while a pound of coffee and ground beef will set you back just $4.43 and $3.74 respectively. A boom in the local economy has pushed prices up a teensy bit, but you can still pick up a check at dinner.

    3. Michigan

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    The Great Lakes State, much like Mississippi and Arkansas, offer low-cost housing (averaged at $274,355) for consumers, yet it’s consistently ranked in the top ten for best states to do business. After all, this is the home of the American auto industry. The average gas price in Detroit was about $2.04 when it hit more than $3 in most parts of the country. The auto industry has bounced back, healthcare is thriving and high-tech jobs are supplanting manufacturing, helping this state become more competitive to prospective employers, keeping the economy working for Michigan citizens.

    4. Arkansas

    Like Mississippi, Arkansas is a more rural state, offering consumers low housing costs. Arkansas also boasts incredibly low costs for doing business, attracting six Fortune 500 companies to the state. Rent for a two-bedroom apartment is just $700 a month and the monthly energy bill is $145.79, roughly half of what you’d pay in Massachusetts. In short, Arkansas’ low cost of living is balanced by a lower household income than average but still remains a top state for the economic climate.

    5. Oklahoma

    Rounding up our list is the Sooner State, the home of undulating wheat fields. And the cost of groceries, including a loaf of wheat bread for less than $3, is appropriately cheap. Well, that isn’t all – a grand 2,400 square-foot home will only chip off around $300K from your bank account. With a sub-$150 monthly energy bill and low-cost health care, Oklahoma is certainly one of the best places you’d be lucky to call home.

    Featured photo credit: US Department of Interior via om.wikipedia.org

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    Published on June 12, 2018

    How Much Money Do I Need to Retire? Find Your Answer Here

    How Much Money Do I Need to Retire? Find Your Answer Here

    It is never too early nor is it ever too late to start planning for retirement. It ultimately depends on your way of life, where are you living, and whether you need to let go of anything. A successful retirement strategy is to have enough pay to cover your expenses with a little cash going into a savings account for sudden financial needs.

    With regards to retirement, we all have an alternate vision in mind. In fact, some think about traveling throughout the world, while some think of a peaceful life with their grandchildren. Whether we get ready for it or not, we will one day turn to retirement age and so, we should be prepared for it. I’m going to tell you how in this article.

    Benefits of early ventures for retirement

    The way this works is you figure out where you need to live, the amount it will cost you to live there (rent/food/transportation), and the various expenses you will need to account for, like travel/insurance/medical bills and taxes. Many people are struggling to put aside money for their future savings and some haven’t started yet. Think you can put off thinking about retirement? The reality is that you need to start thinking about it right now, and putting aside some money from today.

    There are a lot of benefits of taking early steps towards retirement. Utilize the power of compounding, low investment for targeted corpus and you can create more corpus investing the same money:

    • If someone saves $100 every month and starts investing for 30 years at 10% return, initially you will see that within 5-10 years, your investments will not multiply. However, after that period, the corpus will increase immensely with the impact of compounding. The investment period expands the extent of profits increments in the corpus.
    • Suppose there are two people, one aged 30, and the other 40. Both need to resign at 60 with the same retirement objectives of $300,000 USD each. Both will put resources into an investment with 10% of the return. Thus, to accomplish their retirement objective, the younger one needs to save $100 USD / month and the older one needs to collect $300 USD / month. Since the older one has started investing ten years later than the younger one, he will pay more than double what the younger one will pay.
    • If someone saves $100 USD every month and starts investing at 30 years old till 60 and gets 10% annual return, his corpus becomes around $170,000. Otherwise, if he starts the same amount spending at 40 years of age with the same 10% return, he will have around $57,000 USD. He can profit by just investing ten years early.

    You can’t invest too much money in retirement during the early stage of your career since you may have different objectives. However, you can increase the investment gradually if you start investing just a small amount.

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    Average retirement age

    For many people who are nearing retirement age or recently resigned, one of their most significant financial regrets is that they did not focus on saving for their golden years. As per the Consumer Reports study, it demonstrates that only 28% of investors with the age of 55 years or older are pleased with the way they have saved for retirement.

    As per the report, The Economic Policy Institute breaks down how much Americans have put away.[1] Since you know that when the majority of people retire, you can subtract your age from that more significant number and check down what number of more years you need to work.

    But many retirees go back to work. Some of them do part time job while others do seek for a second career. Some even come back to full-time work and then retire again in a couple of years. So deciding their retirement age could be tricky.

    Average retirement savings

    To get retirement started, saving is pretty easy, though it can seem complicated. These simple five steps will make you go on retirement now. So, you don’t need to stress over having the same regrets as today’s retirees.

    1. Invest 15% for your retirement

    Your initial step is to save 15% of your income. This will depend on your gross income and does not include any coordinating assets you get through your employer’s retirement plan.

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    It’s sufficient to enable you to achieve your retirement investment funds objectives, but not too much to keep you from enjoying your income today.

    2. Utilize tax-advantaged retirement plan

    Yes, we utilized the T-word; however, don’t daydream! Split your 15% retirement contributing budget between charge conceded retirement plans like your 401(k) or after-tax plans like a Roth IRA.

    3. Invest your money around

    To put it all in one place is the most significant risk that you can take with your retirement money. With mutual funds, however, you can invest in the biggest and most recognizable brands as well as that new organizations you’ve never known about but has a lot of growth potential.

    Opt a growth-stock mutual fund with background marked by solid returns for both your 401(k) and Roth IRA speculations.

    4. Stay with it

    Since mutual fund investing is less risky than investing in single stocks, it is not risk-free. You can see your savings grow in the long term as long as you can leave your money where it is and keep adding to it.

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    5. Work with an investing professional

    It is essential to look for an investment professional, as you must have a lot of queries concerning your retirement plan during 30 or more years of investing,

    Never make due with an investment professional who recommends or patronizes you to turn over all your investment choices to them. Since this is your retirement, nobody will think or care about it more than you do!

    You might analyze or compare your savings against the average retirement savings for your age group to check whether you’re falling behind or getting towards of the curve. On the other hand, it might be conceivable to hang up the work boots and hit the shoreline with fewer savings if you live easily or below your means.

    How to achieve your financial goals?

    An ideal approach to achieve your financial goals is to stay focused on what you need for your future, ignore everything (and everyone) else that may divert you. There’s a significant business culture out there that requires you to stay in debt, live for the occasion and stress over your future later on.

    You need to start planning for your future from now, not when you have more time or money to invest. You can even talk to a financial advisor for any help. Cooperate to set your money goals and make an action plan to reach them. You can retire younger than you thought you could if you create a project and follow up on it.

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    Start planning for your retirement

    A lot has changed in the last 30 years; our previous generation had an career goal and they would join either a large private company or a government organization immediately after school or college. Then they would spend the next 38 years in the same organization and the form of provident fund and gratuity. They would retire with a decent corpus and they would later spend the remaining time with their pension benefits. It’s a bit different now, but with the above information, you’ll be well prepared.

    Whether you can afford to retire now or not, you need not bother with a retirement calculator to get a rough estimate. You should have the capacity to closely approximate your daily spending habits to figure out how much money goes out the door every year.

    Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

    Reference

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