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6 Most Common SEO Mistakes and How to Correct Them

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6 Most Common SEO Mistakes and How to Correct Them

Driving traffic to a website can be done through using SEO as your primary strategy. This means that traffic is brought to the website for free by researching keywords and finding out what brings in the most traffic, then using them on the website. This may work, but often it takes time and might be slower than one would expect to bring about positive changes; also, it still may not bring the site to the first page of search results.

SEO strategies can be implemented in a short amount of time, but it might take a while to master them. Many times there are just a few mistakes to correct to start achieving positive results.

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1. Forgoing Analytics to See What is Converting

SEO is about more than just getting traffic. It is about converting the traffic into leads. Keeping track of the phrases that bring in the traffic is important, but the downfall is when these keywords don’t bump the website up to the first page. Try to remember that often times, the lower-traffic phrases are better at converting because they are more specific, and having these bring the site to the first page of results can contribute to quite a few sales.

2. Optimizing for the Wrong Geographic Area

When a business is focused on customers that reside in a certain geographic area, it is vital to learn about local search. The keywords used should be specific to the region, such as those in the meta descriptions and page titles. An address and phone number should be available on the pages on the header or footer, allowing for the site to show up on results pages with local businesses. Also, listing the business on places such as Yelp, FourSquare, Google Places, and Merchant Circle will bring the website to the forefront.

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3. Optimizing with the Wrong Keywords

Generic keywords will bring in a lot of traffic, but specific keywords will bring the right kind of traffic. Global keywords won’t bring in a significant amount of local traffic; generic keywords bring in those with little interest, keywords that indicate free information and not a product, and broad keywords will bring a lot of competition.

4. Not Using the Right Title Tags and Meta Descriptions

This is likely one of the easiest SEO mistakes to overlook: each page on the website should have a unique title, as these will show up in tweets and are used in the title when someone bookmarks the website. The titles can contain specific services that are popular search terms. Meta descriptions should be unique and persuasive in only 160 characters. This serves somewhat as a sales pitch that will bring people to the site, and should also include any relevant keywords.

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5. Not Utilizing Anchor Text When Linking Internally

This is a vital part of the website text and should not only be used for a call to action, but internal links as well. This can be linked to an e-commerce services page or the like. The anchor text should also not be the same for every link. Using “This page” or “click here” too many times can hurt the site when it comes to search engines, so mix it up and don’t be afraid to include the keywords.

6. Not Creating Unique and Valuable Content

The content should not only be well written, but also link worthy. Readers will know when content is not unique and not valuable, and when this happens, the trust is lost. If outsourcing writers, the content should be original, well-articulated, and something to be proud of. To complement this, the content should also be relevant, making it valuable. Infographics, text or video tutorials, and top lists are all great options.

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Winning the SEO game is about more than just pumping out content. The information should be relevant, well written, and focused on the right audience. These strategies don’t take much to implement and can bump up your success when utilized properly.

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Last Updated on November 25, 2021

How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

    What Does Private Browsing Do?

    When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

    For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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    The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

    The Terminal Archive

    While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

    Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

    dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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    Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

    Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

    However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

    Clearing Your Tracks

    Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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    dscacheutil -flushcache

    As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

    Other Browsers and Private Browsing

    Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

    If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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    As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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