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Working Environment
Published: May 02, 2017

How to Quit Your Job Without Making Anyone Mad

There comes a time in almost every employee’s life when you sit back and take a long look at what you’re doing and decide whether or not it’s what you want to keep doing, or if it’s time to explore other options, quit your job, and move on.

Maybe you’re trapped in a job where you have no room for advancement and you’ve come to realize that the skills you have would be utilized better at another company. Maybe what you’re doing isn’t the best fit for you anymore and you want to explore other career paths. Or maybe you’re just plain stuck in a job that pains you to get out of bed every day.

A study by Harris Interactive shows that 74% of people would consider finding a new job. What ever your reasons may be for quitting your job, there is a right and a wrong way to do it. Below we’ve mapped out some tips to leave your current job on a good note.

It Can Be Hard to Stay Calm to Give Notice But It’s a Must

If you’re leaving due to being mistreated or not being acknowledged for all you’ve done for the company over the years, it may be really difficult for you to take a calm approach when quitting. Keep in mind though, leaving on bad terms may come back to haunt you if a potential employer asks your old boss about your work ethic and character.

Do Your Best to Keep the Communication Positive and Neutral

If you think about it, nothing good ever really comes from being negative. Your job may suck and your manager may have awful people skills, but don’t allow that to set the tone. Future employers typically tend to side with former supervisors when checking references.

The Best Way to Give Notice Is In Person

Chances are by now you know when your manager will be alone in his or her office. As I said before, you want to keep it positive, even if the circumstances that have you wanting to leave put a bad taste in your mouth. It may ease your mind a bit to remind yourself that you’re not the first person who’s ever quit, and you surely won’t be the last.

Know what you’re going to say before talking to your boss. Even if you’re leaving with good reason, the conversation is likely to be awkward and difficult. Be firm in your decision and be prepared to answer any potentially uncomfortable questions they bring up. Keep it professional.

What Should Be Included in Your Resignation Letter and All In-Person Conversations

  • Thanking your boss for the work opportunity: Bad experience or not, always express gratitude and having the opportunity to grow and learn new skills during your time there. Throwing something in there about having a positive experience working with certain colleagues is good too.
  • The reason you’re leaving: Mentioning the specifics of your new job isn’t really necessary. Maybe you’re leaving to go back to school or have an elderly parent you need to care for. You never want to include anything that would reflect badly on your boss or fellow employees.
  • Help your can offer for the transition: It never hurts to let your boss know that you’re willing to train the new guy and/or be available to them if they have any questions once you leave.
  • Giving notice two weeks in advance: Traditionally, two weeks notice is what you normally give to your employer. If for some reason you aren’t able to provide that much notice, talk with your employer to see if there is any way you could leave sooner.
  • The date you’re leaving: Give your boss a specific date for your last day of employment.

Some Issues You May Face and What to Be Prepared for

Your manager may not want you to go and try to get you to stay. Then what? If you’re certain you’re leaving, say so.

There’s always a chance that when resigning and giving notice, your boss may ask you to pack up your belongings and leave immediately. So make sure you back up anything that belongs to you before talking to your employer.

You may also be required to immediately turn in any company property at that time, such as a laptop, vehicle, or cellphone.

Remember, how you leave your current job is just as important as how you applied for it. Make the effort to go the extra mile when leaving the company. It will do wonders for you and your career path moving forward.

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