We all want to be more hirable. Whether you’re brand new to the job market or you have an established career, being hirable is what it all comes down to at the end of the day. So next time you find yourself in search of a job, remember these 12 things that just might get you the job.

1. Clean up your online presence.

If it’s on the internet, your potential boss can find it. For some reason, people tend to think there’s no way anyone could find that one photo/post/tweet/comment. I’m here to tell you that they can find it, and they will. Remove any inappropriate photos or language from your social media sites. If there’s anything on your accounts that you’re unsure of, take it off anyway. It’s better to be safe than sorry.

2. Create professional social media accounts.

Until recently, I had two Twitter accounts: one that was personal and one that was professional (I’ve since deleted the personal account). Consider creating a LinkedIn profile, which will help you create a professional presence online and network with others in your field.

3. Look the part (and then some).

Interviews require you to do a lot of things: prove your knowledge, demonstrate your communication skills, wow your potential future boss. However, it’s also a test run for what you’ll look like at work. Make sure your outfit is appropriate for the line of work you’re applying to, and then take it up a notch. Interview outfits should always be slightly nicer than everyday office attire. It shows that you put thought and effort into preparing for the interview.

4. Know the company inside and out.

Never go into an interview knowing next to nothing about the company you’re applying to. If you’re in the dark, it will likely show to your interviewer, and it demonstrates that you don’t care very much about getting the job.

5. Create a standout resume.

Your resume should include all the major categories, education, work experience, leadership experience and contact information. However, it should also stand out in some way. I designed a logo using my initials, which I’ve put in the upper righthand corner of my resume. I know other people who have included photos on their resumes. Whatever makes you stand out from the other applicants is a good thing. So go the extra mile and create a clean, visually interesting resume.

6. Understand the job.

Research the position well before you show up to the interview. Don’t apply for something you don’t know anything about, or worse, don’t care about at all. Your knowledge and interest will show in the interview.

7. Practice what you’re going to say.

Hold practice interviews to make sure you’re prepared when the big day comes. Whether you get a friend, family member, professional contact or career counselor to help you with mock interviews, make sure you do some practicing.

8. Update anything that needs it.

If you’ve got a certification that just expired, make sure you update it. The same goes for any rusty skills. Brushing up can help you land the job, especially since it shows that you cared enough about the job to go the extra mile.

9. Say “Thank you.”

Interviewers respond positively to candidates who thank them for their time after an interview. Simply sending a thank you email can leave the interviewer with a positive, lasting impression of you.

10. Look in unexpected places.

If you’re not coming up with any job leads within your professional network, reach out to people in other networks as well. You might be surprised with how many opportunities there are if you’re willing to do a little more work.

11. Ask questions.

At most interviews, candidates are asked if they have any questions for the interviewer. It’s always good to have a few questions prepared. A good question would be, “What made you want to work for this company?” or “What is the company’s culture like?”

12. Be humble.

You want to sell yourself, but you don’t want to come across as arrogant. Try to keep your self-congratulations to a minimum. It’s likely that your skills will speak for themselves.

Featured photo credit: Aidan Jones via flickr.com

Love this article?