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Want to Work at Home? Weed Out the Scams: 10 Legitimate Opportunties

Want to Work at Home? Weed Out the Scams: 10 Legitimate Opportunties

When it comes to finding an opportunity to work at home, the fear of getting scammed can be overwhelming–but you shouldn’t let it deter you. A simple rule of thumb is to never sign up with a company that asks you to pay for ANYTHING related to the business. If you start your online career by shelling out, whether it’s for materials or more information, the only group making any money is going to be the scammers–from out of your pocket.

By contrast, if a business provides any of the following in their ad, they’re probably a legitimate company:

  • The name of the company (which you should research to learn more about its credentials)
  • An email address that is linked to the company’s website (not a blind address)
  • Mention of benefits or other policies associated with traditional commuter jobs
  • Details on the application and interview process
  • Mention of a human resources staff member to whom questions can be directed

Of course, providing the above information is not always enough proof that is a business is legitimate. The following 10 home-based online business offers are usually scam-free and have the potential to net you reliable money without your ever changing out of your pajamas.

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Call Center Representative

In the past, calling a company’s customer service line usually connected you to employee of a huge call center that might even have been outside the country. But businesses are increasingly routing calls to representatives who work from home. If you’re hired as an employee rather than a contractor, you may be eligible for benefits. Convergys, Alpine Access, and West Corporation are all reliable sources of work.

Web Search Evaluator

Search engine results don’t rely on algorithms alone. The major search sites all hire real live humans to analyze search results and make recommendations. You’ll need to pass a test before getting web search evaluator work, but Appen Butler Hill, Lionbridge, and Leapforce all hire reliably once you’ve passed.

Medical Transcriptionist

Though you’ll need a certification or associate’s degree, working from home as a medical transcriptionist can net you up to $50,000 per year with the possibility of benefits. If you’ve got the necessary skills, check out Amphion Medical Solutions, M*Modal, and Precyse for job listings.

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Web Developer

If you’ve got web design skills or knowledge of code and computer programming, you may be qualified to freelance as a web designer and consultant. If starting your own business isn’t an option, you can choose from the thousands of short-term jobs available on sites like ODesk.com or RatRaceRebellion.com.

Translator

Fluent in another language? Make your linguistic skills work for you. Translation is one of the fastest-growing fields of at-home work, so if you’re capable of translating audio files or documents than you could quickly set up a robust online business. SDL, Argos Translations, and We Localize are three top companies that hire freelance translators.

Virtual Assistant

More and more businesses are hiring virtual assistants rather than in-house staff members. This is great news for you, if you’ve got experience in scheduling, event planning, bookkeeping, preparing memos, or other office-type work. The International Virtual Assistants Association provides a job board through which you can find these at-home positions.

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Tech Support Representative

Companies are now increasingly routing tech support calls to at-home representatives instead of large call centers, so if you’ve got relevant experience and the necessary certification, a stay-home tech support business could be perfect for you. Large companies tend to hire directly, but you can also find work through independent agencies like PlumChoice.

Survey Taker

There’s a robust market out there for those willing to spend their time giving opinions online. Though survey taker jobs don’t pay as much as some of the opportunities on the list, they can be one of the most fun and engaging opportunities for those who work from home. Check out RatRaceRebellion.com for reliable survey taker resources.

Tutor

Depending on your level of education and expertise, you could make a very comfortable wage sharing your knowledge in online classrooms and live chats with students. Tutor.com and GetEducated.com are good resources for finding work.

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Freelance Writer/Editor

Though it can be hard to break into, freelance writing and blogging can be a very rewarding way to make money from home. Proofreaders and editors can also make significant cash by plying their trades online. ODesk.com is an excellent resource for all types of online freelance opportunities, while companies like Cactus Communications and FirstEditing are geared more toward proofreaders.

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Last Updated on March 25, 2020

How to Set Ambitious Career Goals (With Examples)

How to Set Ambitious Career Goals (With Examples)

Taking your work to the next level means setting and keeping career goals. A career goal is a targeted objective that explains what you want your ultimate profession to be.

Defining career goals is a critical step to achieving success. You need to know where you’re going in order to get there. Knowing what your career goals are isn’t just important for you–it’s important for potential employers too. The relationship between an employer and an employee works best when your goals for the future and their goals align. Saying, “Oh, I don’t know. I’ll do anything,” makes you seem indecisive, and opens you up to taking on ill-fitting tasks that won’t lead you to your dream life.

Career goal templates’ one-size-fits-all approach won’t consider your unique goals and experiences. They won’t help you stand out, and they may not reflect your full potential.

In this article, I’ll help you to define your career goals with SMART goal framework, and will provide you with a list of examples goals for work and career.

How to Define Your Career Goal with SMART

Instead of relying on a generalized framework to explain your vision, use a tried-and-true goal-setting model. SMART is an acronym for “Specific, Measurable, Action-oriented, Realistic with Timelines.”[1] The SMART framework demystifies goals by breaking them into smaller steps.

Helpful hints when setting SMART career goals:

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  • Start with short-term goals first. Work on your short-term goals, and then progress the long-term interests.[2] Short-term goals are those things which take 1-3 years to complete. Long-term goals take 3-5 years to do. As you succeed in your short-term goals, that success should feed into accomplishing your long-term goals.
  • Be specific, but don’t overdo it. You need to define your career goals, but if you make them too specific, then they become unattainable. Instead of saying, “I want to be the next CEO of Apple, where I’ll create a billion-dollar product,” try something like, “My goal is to be the CEO of a successful company.”
  • Get clear on how you’re going to reach your goals. You should be able to explain the actions you’ll take to advance your career. If you can’t explain the steps, then you need to break your goal down into more manageable chunks.
  • Don’t be self-centered. Your work should not only help you advance, but it should also support the goals of your employer. If your goals differ too much, then it might be a sign that the job you’ve taken isn’t a good fit.

If you want to learn more about setting SMART Goals, watch the video below to learn how you can set SMART career goals.

After you’re clear on how to set SMART goals, you can use this framework to tackle other aspects of your work. For instance, you might set SMART goals to improve your performance review, look for a new job, or shift your focus to a different career.

We’ll cover examples of ways to use SMART goals to meet short-term career goals in the next section.

Why You Need an Individual Development Plan

Setting goals is one part of the larger formula for success. You may know what you want to do, but you also have to figure out what skills you have, what you lack, and where your greatest strengths and weaknesses are.

One of the best ways to understand your capabilities is by using the Science Careers Individual Development Plan skills assessment. It’s free, and all you need to do is register an account and take a few assessments.

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These assessments will help you determine if your career goals are realistic. You’ll come away with a better understanding of your unique talents and skill-sets. You may decide to change some of your career goals or alter your timeline based on what you learn.

40 Examples of Goals for Work & Career

All this talk of goal-setting and self-assessment may sound great in theory, but perhaps you need some inspiration to figure out what your goals should be.

For Changing a Job

  1. Attend more networking events and make new contacts.
  2. Achieve a promotion to __________ position.
  3. Get a raise.
  4. Plan and take a vacation this year.
  5. Agree to take on new responsibilities.
  6. Develop meaningful relationships with your coworkers and clients.
  7. Ask for feedback on a regular basis.
  8. Learn how to say, “No,” when you are asked to take on too much.
  9. Delegate tasks that you no longer need to be responsible for.
  10. Strive to be in a leadership role in __ number of years.

For Switching Career Path

  1. Pick up and learn a new skill.
  2. Find a mentor.
  3. Become a volunteer in the field that interests you.
  4. Commit to getting training or going back to school.
  5. Read the most recent books related to your field.
  6. Decide whether you are happy with your work-life balance and make changes if necessary. [3]
  7. Plan what steps you need to take to change careers.[4]
  8. Compile a list of people who could be character references or submit recommendations.
  9. Commit to making __ number of new contacts in the field this year.
  10. Create a financial plan.

For Getting a Promotion

  1. Reduce business expenses by a certain percentage.
  2. Stop micromanaging your team members.
  3. Become a mentor.
  4. Brainstorm ways that you could improve your productivity and efficiency at work
  5. Seek a new training opportunity to address a weakness.[5]
  6. Find a way to organize your work space.[6]
  7. Seek feedback from a boss or trusted coworker every week/ month/ quarter.
  8. Become a better communicator.
  9. Find new ways to be a team player.
  10. Learn how to reduce work hours without compromising productivity.

For Acing a Job Interview

  1. Identify personal boundaries at work and know what you should do to make your day more productive and manageable.
  2. Identify steps to create a professional image for yourself.
  3. Go after the career of your dreams to find work that does not feel like a job.
  4. Look for a place to pursue your interest and apply your knowledge and skills.
  5. Find a new way to collaborate with experts in your field.
  6. Identify opportunities to observe others working in the career you want.
  7. Become more creative and break out of your comfort zone.
  8. Ask to be trained more relevant skills for your work.
  9. Ask for opportunities to explore the field and widen your horizon
  10. Set your eye on a specific award at work and go for it.

Career Goal Setting FAQs

I’m sure you still have some questions about setting your own career goals, so here I’m listing out the most commonly asked questions about career goals.

1. What if I’m not sure what I want my career to be?

If you’re uncertain, be honest about it. Let the employer know as much as you know about what you want to do. Express your willingness to use your strengths to contribute to the company. When you take this approach, back up your claim with some examples.

If you’re not even sure where to begin with your career, check out this guide:

How to Find Your Ideal Career Path Without Wasting Time on Jobs Not Suitable for You

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2. Is it okay to lie about my career goals?

Lying to potential employers is bound to end in disaster. In the interview, a lie can make you look foolish because you won’t know how to answer follow up questions.

Even if you think your career goal may not precisely align with the employer’s expectations for a long-term hire, be open and honest. There’s probably more common ground than they realize, and it’s up to you to bridge any gaps in expectations.

Being honest and explaining these connections shows your employer that you’ve put a lot of thought into this application. You aren’t just telling them what they want to hear.

3. Is it better to have an ambitious goal, or should I play it safe?

You should have a goal that challenges you, but SMART goals are always reasonable. If you put forth a goal that is way beyond your capabilities, you will seem naive. Making your goals too easy shows a lack of motivation.

Employers want new hires who are able to self-reflect and are willing to take on challenges.

4. Can I have several career goals?

It’s best to have one clearly-defined career goal and stick with it. (Of course, you can still have goals in other areas of your life.) Having a single career goal shows that you’re capable of focusing, and it shows that you like to accomplish what you set out to do.

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On the other hand, you might have multiple related career goals. This could mean that you have short-term goals that dovetail into your ultimate long-term career goal. You might also have several smaller goals that feed into a single purpose.

For example, if you want to become a lawyer, you might become a paralegal and attend law school at the same time. If you want to be a school administrator, you might have initial goals of being a classroom teacher and studying education policy. In both cases, these temporary jobs and the extra education help you reach your ultimate goal.

Summary

You’ll have to devote some time to setting career goals, but you’ll be so much more successful with some direction. Remember to:

  • Set SMART goals. SMART goals are Specific, Measurable, Action-oriented, and Realistic with Timelines. When you set goals with these things in mind, you are likely to achieve the outcomes you want.
  • Have short-term and long-term goals. Short-term career goals can be completed in 1-3 years, while long-term goals will take 3-5 years to finish. Your short-term goals should set you up to accomplish your long-term goals.
  • Assess your capabilities by coming up with an Individual Development Plan. Knowing how to set goals won’t help you if you don’t know yourself. Understand what your strengths and weaknesses are by taking some self-assessments.
  • Choose goals that are appropriate to your ultimate aims. Your career goals should be relevant to one another. If they aren’t, then you may need to narrow your focus. Your goals should match the type of job that you want and the quality of life that you want to lead.
  • Be clear about your goals with potential employers. Always be honest with potential employers about what you want to do with your life. If your goals differ from the company’s objectives, find a way bridge the gap between what you want for yourself and what your employer expects.

By doing goal-setting work now, you’ll be able to make conscious choices on your career path. You can always adjust your plan if things change for you, but the key is to give yourself a road map for success.

More Tips About Setting Work Goals

Featured photo credit: Tyler Franta via unsplash.com

Reference

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