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Top 25 Best Neighborhoods For Millennials

Top 25 Best Neighborhoods For Millennials

After earning a degree, many American college graduates move to America’s biggest cities to hunt for jobs and apartments.If you are one of these young graduates attempting to strike out on your own, a website dedicated to education analysis called Niche Ink put together a list of the best metro areas for millennials. The site ranked the metro areas in the U.S. using twelve factors including data from FBI crime rates, the U.S. Census, and surveys of close to 500,000 college students and graduates. Data also came from Niche Ink user opinions about the best places to start a new life after school. The company calculated the best neighborhood for young people in each of those cities based on the mentioned factors. So, here is the list of best cities and neighborhoods for young millennials.

1. New York, NY (Best Neighborhood: Greenpoint, Brooklyn)      

Greenpoint

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    Greenpoint is a bit safer than its neighbor Williamsburg. The cost of living is a little cheaper, too. This Brooklyn area is an ideal place to eat, drink, and shop and is thickly populated by young professionals. In Greenpoint, the median rent is $1,157. This amount is easily handled by its residents since they earn an average income of $31,703. Twenty-five (25) to 34 years old residents constitute 14% of its population. The representative college is New York University.

    2. Austin, TX (Best Neighborhood: South River City)

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      South River City is a neighborhood that’s full of nightlife and shopping. Many young families are attracted here because it’s one of Austin’s most family-friendly areas with many schools just nearby. The average income of residents is $30,816 and 17% of the population is composed of 25 to 34 year old young professionals. The crime rate is below average and the representative college is University of Texas – Austin.

      3. Washington, D.C. (Best Neighborhood: Clarendon) 

      Arlington, Va.

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        Arlington, Va. is where you can find Clarendon, the best neighborhood for millennials in the area. It’s a wise option for millennials since it offers affordable rent and accessibility to the city. The mix of small restaurants, bars, shops, and luxury apartments is another reason for its popularity. Clarendon’s median rent is $1,353 with residents having an average income of $42,226. People aged 25 to 34 form 15% of its population. The crime rate is average. The representative college is Georgetown University.

        4. Chicago, IL (Best Neighborhood: Wicker Park)

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          Photo Credit: sassnasty via Compfight cc

          Recently, crime rate in Wicker Park has decreased. That’s why a lot of downtown workers have moved to this area. In this neighborhood northwest of the Loop, there are stores, restaurants, and bars catering to young professionals. The residents of wicker park have an average income of $30, 061. The prevailing rent is $931 and 14% of the residents are people aged 25 to 34. The representative college is DePaul University

          5. San Francisco, CA (Best Neighborhood: Cow Hollow)

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            Between Russian Hill and the Presidio is a neighborhood that has become affluent. Cow Hollow houses wellness centers, health spas, boutiques, and fancy restaurants. The average income is $39,119 and 15% of its population is aged 25 to 34 yeasr old. The median rent is $1,344. The crime rate is average and the representative college is the University of San Francisco.

            6. Boston, MA (Best Neighborhood: Spring Hill)

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              Despite the fact that Davis Square and Cambridge are nearby, housing prices in Spring Hill are relatively low. That’s why it has become so popular among young people. Bars, coffee shops, and restaurants also proliferate in the area. Thirteen percent (13%) of its residents are 25 to 34 years old. They have an average income of $33,659 and the median rent is $1,163. Crime Rate is below average and the representative college is Boston University.

              7. Denver, CO (Best Neighborhood: Speer)

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                Would you like to live in a revitalized neighborhood? Then Speer is where you should be. It’s an area in Denver where high-rise apartments and commercial structures abound. Looking for classy bars and breweries? No problem, you’ll find them here. Median rent is $902. The average income is $32,422. Fifteen Percent (15%) of the population is composed of young and on the upswing professionals aged 25 to 34. The crime Rate is below average and the representative college is the University of Denver.

                8. Dallas-Fort Worth, TX (Best Neighborhood: Oak Lawn)

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                  One of the richest areas of Dallas is Oak Lawn. There are many  apartments, condos, townhouses, and urban professionals. Good clubs, restaurants, and bars reign in the area and they are particularly attractive for the LGBT community. People aged 25 to 34 make up 15% of its population. The average income is $29,830 and $874 is the median rent. Crime Rate is below average and the Representative College is Southern Methodist University.

                  9. Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN (Best Neighborhood: North Loop)

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                    It used to be the city’s warehouse district. Now the North Loop is the area for its art scene with many bars, local restaurants, and shopping. Here, the median rent is $864, with residents enjoying an average median income of $33,511. Young people who are aged 25 to 34 constitute 14% of the residents.The crime rate is average and the representative college is the University of Minnesota.

                    10. San Diego, CA (Best Neighborhood: Little Italy)

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                      Wikimedia Commons

                      Downtown San Diego has a hilly area called Little Italy that has been re-gentrified. Now it’s the city’s main center for festivals, art galleries, retail shops, and Italian restaurants. People aged 25 to 34 make up 15% of its population. The median rent of $1,261 is easily settled by the residents whose average income is $30,196. Crime rate is low and the representative college is the University of San Diego.

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                      11. San Jose, CA (Best Neighborhood: Old Mountain View)

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                        Where do tech companies and a lot of restaurants, cafes, and shops reside? Right . . . Old Mountain View. It has great views of the Santa Cruz mountains. At Old Mountain View, 15% of the population is aged 25 to 34 years old. They median income is $37,484. How about the median rent? It’s $1,454. Crime rate is low and the representative college is San Jose University.

                        12. Raleigh, NC (Best Neighborhood: Morrisville)

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                          Google Maps

                          Morrisville is scenic with picture-perfect parks. It’s a place full of activities geared towards young families with children. Organized community sports are common in Morrisville. Its multipurpose fields make it a true haven for a burgeoning starter families. Twenty five (25) to 34 years old professionals form 14% of the population. If a less than a thousand rent sounds good to you, you’ll be comfy in Morrisville; the median rent is $855. To cope with the standard of living there, you must come up with an average median income of $31,899. Crime rate is low and the representative college is North Carolina State University.

                          13.Seattle, WA (Best Neighborhood: Eastlake)

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                            Wikipedia Commons

                            Lake Union graces Eastlake on its eastern shore. It’s considered one of the most appealing residential areas in the U.S. because of the combination of small businesses, apartments, and houses. This pretty neighborhood houses numerous boutiques, bakeries, and restaurants. The median rent is higher than Victorian Village at $1,033 with the population averaging a median income of $34,199. Twenty-five (25) to 34 year old professionals make up 15% of the population. Crime rate is low and the representative college is the University of Washington.

                            14. Columbus, O(Best Neighborhood: Victorian Village)

                            Victorian village

                              Wikipedia Commons

                              If you’re like me and you love living in a neighborhood among gorgeous houses turned into beautiful rented apartments, you’ll love staying in Victorian Village. A pretty place northwest of downtown Columbus, it counts Ohio State University as one of its famous neighbors. Fourteen percent (14%) of the residents are aged 25 to 34. Median rent is $777. Make sure you have an average income of $28,977, if you plan to make it your home. Crime rate is average and the representative college is Ohio State University.

                              15. Pittsburgh, PA (Best Neighborhood: Shadyside)

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                                Wikipedia Commons

                                If you love being around historic residences, this is your place. Shadyside has that historic look that appeals to people who appreciate buildings with charachter. It is located at the east end of Pittsburgh and offers numerous upscale stores and boutiques as well as a number of cozy restaurants. Shadyside’s median rent is $672. If you can derive a annual income that sings to the tune of $25, 000 to $26,000, you’ll have no problem living there; Shadyside’s median income is $25,520. Twenty-five (25) to 34 year-old workers account for 11% of the population.

                                16. Phoenix, AZ (Best Neighborhood: Tempe)

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                                  Wikipedia Commons

                                  Tempe is situated in the East Valley section of Phoenix. It is an artsy and friendly area with numerous bars and a lake that is perfect for outdoor activities. 14% of its population is aged 25 to 34, and it has a median rent of $934. The average income is $29,139. Crime rate is below average and the representative college is Arizona State University.

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                                  17. Los Angeles, CA (Best Neighborhood: Palms)

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                                    Google Maps

                                    Palms is located at the west side of Los Angeles. It is one of the oldest neighborhoods in L.A., providing several apartment buildings, and offers Indian and Pakistani restaurants. The median rent in Palms is $1,218 with residents averaging an income of $26,482. Fourteen percent (14%) of the population is composed of 25 to 34 year olds. The crime rate is low and the representative college is the University of Southern California.

                                    18. Charlotte, N.C. (Best Neighborhood: Third Ward)

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                                      The Third Ward has charming town-homes and beautiful Sycamore trees. It has a dog park, a community garden, and is proudly family-oriented. Fourteen percent (14%) of its population is aged 25 to 34, and it has a median rent of $818. The average income of residents is $28,494. The crime rate is below average and the representative college is the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.

                                      19. New Orleans, LA (Best Neighborhood: Lower Garden District)

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                                        Google Maps

                                        The Lower Garden District has been rapidly gentrifying recently and has some of the most beautiful residences in the city. More shops and bars have been opening lately to cater to a younger crowd. Median rent in the Lower Garden District is $913. The population’s average median income is $25,297. Thirteen (13%) of residents are people aged 25 to 34 years old. The crime rate is below average and the representative college is Tulane University.

                                        20. Salt Lake City, UT (Best Neighborhood: East Central)

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                                          Google Maps

                                          East Central has a unique and diverse community with numerous wide grassy parks and great shopping. The city’s transit options is within walking distance. People aged 25 to 34 constitute 17% of its residents. Median rent is $852. Average income is $27,561. Crime rate, however, is a little above average. The representative college is the University of Utah.

                                          21. Houston, TX (Best Neighborhood: Midtown)

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                                            Midtown is in southwest downtown Houston. There you will find lots of bars, bánh mì restaurants, shopping centers, and other attractions for young people. The median rent is $860. Average median income is $28,306. Fifteen (15%) of the population is composed of 25 to 34 year-old professionals who are either gainfully employed or running a business. Crime rate is average and the representative college is the University of Houston.

                                            22. Indianapolis, IN (Best Neighborhood: Fishers)

                                            Fishers

                                              Google Maps

                                              A suburb of Indianapolis, Fishers, is one of the most affordable neighborhoods in the U.S. It’s nearby a shopping center and a reservoir where people can fish and water-ski. Fourteen percent (14%) of its residents are aged 25 to 34. Median rent is $763 and the average income is $28,664. The crime rate is average and the representative college is Indiana University and Purdue University.

                                              23. Richmond,VA (Best Neighborhood: Shockoe Bottom)

                                              Shockoe Bottom in Richmond, Va.

                                                Google Maps

                                                Shockoe Bottom is located east of downtown Richmond along the James River. It has become a major destination for nightlife, dining, and entertainment. Twenty-five (25) to 34 year old residents comprise 13% of its population. Median rent is $921. The average income is $30,324. Crime Rate is below average and the representative college is Virginia Commonwealth University.

                                                24. Orlando, FL (Best Neighborhood: Lake Eola Heights)

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                                                  Google Maps

                                                  Lake Eola Heights, a safe community in downtown Orlando, boasts of a nice selection of condos as well as historic homes. The median rent is $1,018. Residents are averaging a median income of $25,330. Like the rest of the locations featured here, 25 to 34 year-old individuals constitute 14% of the residents. Crime rate is above average and the representative college is the University of Central Florida.

                                                  25. Atlanta, GA (Best Neighborhood: Ardmore)

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                                                    Google Maps

                                                    Ardmore is a friendly residential neighborhood, proudly dog-oriented, and is well known for its gorgeous park. Fourteen percent (14%) of its population are people aged 25 to 34. Median rent is $937 and the average income is $29,863. The crime rate is a little higher than average and the representative college is Georgia Tech.

                                                    Featured photo credit: New York, NY/Photo Credit: robbarry via Compfight cc via compfight.com

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                                                    Anthony Dejolde

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                                                    Last Updated on July 10, 2020

                                                    Feeling Stuck in Your Career? How to Break Free and Get Ahead

                                                    Feeling Stuck in Your Career? How to Break Free and Get Ahead

                                                    Have you ever caught yourself in a daydream where you’ve gone for that upcoming promotion, and you’re now the boss at work? Or how about the one where you’ve summoned up all your courage to quit a job where you’re feeling stuck in your career and live your dream instead? Or when you’ve changed career paths to do what really makes you happy?

                                                    Then, you snapped back to reality and realized that you’re not the boss, not living your dream, and not even happy in the career path that you’re on.

                                                    Over the years I’ve worked with hundreds of individuals who’ve told me they feel stuck in their careers, that something had to change for them to break free and be happy, but they lacked the confidence to take that step. My mission is to make sure that nobody feels stuck in their career because of a momentary lapse in bravery that’s dragged on for too long.

                                                    Read on to find out how you can stop feeling stuck in your career, break free, and get ahead at work. .

                                                    Here are my top ten tips for becoming unstuck in your career.

                                                    1. Make Time for You

                                                    If you’re feeling stuck, frustrated, or unhappy with how your career is panning out, the first step is to work out why.

                                                    Maybe you’ve arrived in your current career by accident and haven’t ever made time to deliberately think or plan what you’d love to do and how you’d get there.

                                                    Prioritizing time to think is the first step you need to take to stop feeling stuck and start getting ahead. Book some time into your day where you can have an uninterrupted meeting with yourself. This is your thinking time.

                                                    Work out what makes you happy at work, what doesn’t, and where you might want to go. Decide on the steps you want to take to progress your career in the direction that you want it to take.

                                                    For example, are there training days, evening courses, or online learning that you can do? Have you considered getting a mentor to help you get ahead?

                                                    By booking in a meeting with yourself, it signals it’s important (to you and your colleagues) and also stops others spotting a gap in your day and filling it with a meeting.

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                                                    2. Grow Your Network Before You Need It

                                                    Who you know is more important than what you know for career progression. Don’t wait until you’re feeling stuck in your career to start expanding your networks. Do it now.

                                                    Adam Grant, the author of Give and Take, says you’re 58% more likely to get a new job through your weak ties than through your strong ones. Your strong ties are those in your immediate circle whom you interact with often. Your weak ties are your friends of friends. They move in different circles to you, they know different people, make different connections, and are more likely to introduce you to new and different opportunities[1].

                                                    When I was thinking about setting up my current company, Lucidity, I turned up to every networking event. I drank a lot of coffees with a lot of different people to understand what they did, to ask for advice, to unpick what their problems were, and to look for opportunities for collaboration and connections.

                                                    It paid off because, when I launched my business, I let my network know how I could help them, and soon I had my first clients.

                                                    Pay attention to building and nurturing your networks and focus on how you can add value to other. That’s where your next career opportunity is most likely to come from.

                                                    3. Surround Yourself With People Who Inspire You

                                                    According to Tim Ferriss, “You are the average of the five people you most associate with,” and his associations with different people ebbs and flows depending on what he’s working on and trying to achieve[2].

                                                    For example, if you are trying to be fitter, it’s easier if you hang around with people who love doing exercise–they help you to up your game.

                                                    If you want that promotion, a career change, or to set up your own business, seek out people who are excelling at it already. They’ll have valuable things to teach you about breaking free and getting ahead.

                                                    4. Work on Your Personal Brand

                                                    Jeff Bezos defines a personal brand as “what people say about you when you’re not in the room.” People will talk about you when you are not in the room anyway, so you might as well be deliberate about what you’d like people to say!

                                                    Your personal brand isn’t about pretending to be something you’re not. That can actually keep you feeling stuck in your career. It’s really about being your best “real you.” It’s about owning your strengths and being purposeful about how you want to be perceived by others.

                                                    What do you want to be known for? By being more deliberate about how you want to come across and what you’re looking for in your career, you’ll increase your chance of attracting the right opportunities.

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                                                    Once you’ve given your personal brand some thought, make sure that you show up online. Is your LinkedIn profile up to date? And if you don’t have one, get one. Make sure it communicates what you want to be known for and that it’s consistent with your other social media profiles.

                                                    Try these 5 Steps to Master Networking Skills and Perfect Your Personal Branding.

                                                    5. Be Accountable

                                                    Achieve your career goals faster, and grow and learn by making yourself accountable. Tell other people your goals and a timeline. and have them to hold you accountable.

                                                    For example, you might want to get a promotion by the end of the year, have decided the sector you want to move to by the end of the month, or have got your new business idea before the next pay day. Whatever your ambitions are, you can tell a friend or a colleague, or share this with a mentor or a mastermind group.

                                                    When we tell other people our goals and intentions, they hold us accountable, and we are more likely to make progress faster.

                                                    6. Make Sure Your Values Are Aligned With Your Company’s

                                                    All the professional development, goal setting, and networks in the world won’t make you happy if you’re working for a company that ultimately has opposing values to yours.

                                                    Figure out what’s important to you in a job. For example, does your company’s product help people live a better life? Do you feel strongly about your company’s ethics and social responsibility? Does the company culture allows employees to be themselves and shine? Or maybe flexible working and more holidays for employees with families is where your heart is?

                                                    Some companies put their employees well-being at the core of their business; others put profits first. If you feel that your values don’t match the core values of your employer, it could be a reason why you’re feeling stuck in your career and unhappy.

                                                    It’s important to work through this and identify whether it’s the job that is not right for you, or if it’s a great job but the organization or sector is wrong for you.

                                                    7. Get out of Your Comfort Zone

                                                    Your comfort zone is your safe place. For any change to happen, you have to step out of your comfort zone.

                                                    It’s actually much easier not to change anything and to keep grumbling on about how you’re stuck and unhappy in your career than to step outside of your comfort zone to address the fearful unknowns associated with change. It’s part of human nature that we’d put up with the devil we know rather than risk the devil we don’t.

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                                                    This is true even if the devil we know is a boring, unfulfilling job because we’re wired to think that making a change to find a better option might actually leave us worse off.

                                                    If you feel stuck, it might be that your confidence has got the better of you.

                                                    To get ahead at work, start taking small steps outside of your comfort zone. Consider what you’re scared of that is stopping you from making a change. Then, tackle that in small steps.

                                                    For example, if you know that to move into the job you want, you’ll have to do more public speaking, but public speaking terrifies you so much it’s stopping you from going for the job, then start small to build your confidence. You can speak up more in team meetings, then slowly build from there.

                                                    You might also choose to set up or be part of a specific group. One of my clients, who found that confidence was holding her team back in achieving work goals, set up a “get out of your comfort zone club,” where they challenge and support each other to build their confidence by regularly leaving their comfort zones.

                                                    8. Learn to Embrace Failure

                                                    Failure is part of life. A New York University study found that children learning to walk averaged 2,368 steps and fell 17 times an hour[3]. Failure is simply the natural path to success.

                                                    The truth is that we don’t get everything right the first time. We fail, we learn, we pick ourselves up, and we try again.

                                                    In my experience, it’s common that whilst the theory of learning from failure is supported, the reality of being open about failures to enable personal learning is much harder to achieve.

                                                    We don’t like to admit that we’ve failed. We have a fight or flight response to failure. It’s a normal gut reaction to ask ourselves: “Will I get away with it if I don’t tell anyone?” We are fearful of criticism, of losing face in front of others, or even being fired for failure.

                                                    However, if you’re going to stop feeling stuck in your career, you must be open to learning from failure.

                                                    Reframe failure by viewing everything as an experiment because you can’t have a failed experiment—you just learn whether something works or not. Think of Edison inventing the lightbulb, when he said:

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                                                    “I’ve not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.”

                                                    9. Build Your Resilience

                                                    Resilience is the ability to tackle difficulties and setbacks, to bounce back, regroup, and to keep going.

                                                    Getting unstuck in your career, taking a different path, and achieving the results you want will take resilience. Having resilience is also the capacity to choose how you respond to the unexpected things that life throws your way and adapt and thrive in times of complex change.

                                                    Given that the world we live in is in constant flux, and the only thing that is certain is uncertainty, the ability to adapt and bounce back is an important life skill, as well as a career skill.

                                                    In her book Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance, Angela Duckworth’s research shows that when measuring success, the ability to persevere beats talent every time.

                                                    Learn more about how to build resilience in this guide: What Is Resilience and How to Always Be Resilient (Step-By-Step Guide)

                                                    10. Ask for Help

                                                    It can be hard to ask for help, as it can make us feel vulnerable.

                                                    No one person can be expected to have all the answers. That’s why we need a group of people that we can go to for help, people who can pick us up when we have setbacks and also help us to celebrate success.

                                                    My advice is to be deliberate about creating your group. You can do that with a tool called a “Me Map”:

                                                    1. Write down all the things that you might need support with, like help with career progression, interview practice, making new connections, talking through business plans, learning from failure, etc.
                                                    2. Next to each thing, write the names of the people you go to when you need that particular thing.
                                                    3. Make sure you get in touch and regularly connect with them.

                                                    Final Thoughts

                                                    You can stop feeling stuck in your career, break free, and get ahead at work by applying the tips in this article. Start small by incorporating three new things in your first week, and then adding more as your comfort zone and capacity expands.

                                                    Remember, no matter how stuck you feel, it’s never too late to make a change and land the career that you truly want.

                                                    More Tips to Stop Feeling Stuck in Your Career

                                                    Featured photo credit: NEW DATA SERVICES via unsplash.com

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