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Top 25 Best Neighborhoods For Millennials

Top 25 Best Neighborhoods For Millennials

After earning a degree, many American college graduates move to America’s biggest cities to hunt for jobs and apartments.If you are one of these young graduates attempting to strike out on your own, a website dedicated to education analysis called Niche Ink put together a list of the best metro areas for millennials. The site ranked the metro areas in the U.S. using twelve factors including data from FBI crime rates, the U.S. Census, and surveys of close to 500,000 college students and graduates. Data also came from Niche Ink user opinions about the best places to start a new life after school. The company calculated the best neighborhood for young people in each of those cities based on the mentioned factors. So, here is the list of best cities and neighborhoods for young millennials.

1. New York, NY (Best Neighborhood: Greenpoint, Brooklyn)      

Greenpoint

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    Greenpoint is a bit safer than its neighbor Williamsburg. The cost of living is a little cheaper, too. This Brooklyn area is an ideal place to eat, drink, and shop and is thickly populated by young professionals. In Greenpoint, the median rent is $1,157. This amount is easily handled by its residents since they earn an average income of $31,703. Twenty-five (25) to 34 years old residents constitute 14% of its population. The representative college is New York University.

    2. Austin, TX (Best Neighborhood: South River City)

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      South River City is a neighborhood that’s full of nightlife and shopping. Many young families are attracted here because it’s one of Austin’s most family-friendly areas with many schools just nearby. The average income of residents is $30,816 and 17% of the population is composed of 25 to 34 year old young professionals. The crime rate is below average and the representative college is University of Texas – Austin.

      3. Washington, D.C. (Best Neighborhood: Clarendon) 

      Arlington, Va.

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        Arlington, Va. is where you can find Clarendon, the best neighborhood for millennials in the area. It’s a wise option for millennials since it offers affordable rent and accessibility to the city. The mix of small restaurants, bars, shops, and luxury apartments is another reason for its popularity. Clarendon’s median rent is $1,353 with residents having an average income of $42,226. People aged 25 to 34 form 15% of its population. The crime rate is average. The representative college is Georgetown University.

        4. Chicago, IL (Best Neighborhood: Wicker Park)

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          Photo Credit: sassnasty via Compfight cc

          Recently, crime rate in Wicker Park has decreased. That’s why a lot of downtown workers have moved to this area. In this neighborhood northwest of the Loop, there are stores, restaurants, and bars catering to young professionals. The residents of wicker park have an average income of $30, 061. The prevailing rent is $931 and 14% of the residents are people aged 25 to 34. The representative college is DePaul University

          5. San Francisco, CA (Best Neighborhood: Cow Hollow)

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            Between Russian Hill and the Presidio is a neighborhood that has become affluent. Cow Hollow houses wellness centers, health spas, boutiques, and fancy restaurants. The average income is $39,119 and 15% of its population is aged 25 to 34 yeasr old. The median rent is $1,344. The crime rate is average and the representative college is the University of San Francisco.

            6. Boston, MA (Best Neighborhood: Spring Hill)

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              Despite the fact that Davis Square and Cambridge are nearby, housing prices in Spring Hill are relatively low. That’s why it has become so popular among young people. Bars, coffee shops, and restaurants also proliferate in the area. Thirteen percent (13%) of its residents are 25 to 34 years old. They have an average income of $33,659 and the median rent is $1,163. Crime Rate is below average and the representative college is Boston University.

              7. Denver, CO (Best Neighborhood: Speer)

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                Photo Credit: chiang_benjamin via Compfight cc

                Would you like to live in a revitalized neighborhood? Then Speer is where you should be. It’s an area in Denver where high-rise apartments and commercial structures abound. Looking for classy bars and breweries? No problem, you’ll find them here. Median rent is $902. The average income is $32,422. Fifteen Percent (15%) of the population is composed of young and on the upswing professionals aged 25 to 34. The crime Rate is below average and the representative college is the University of Denver.

                8. Dallas-Fort Worth, TX (Best Neighborhood: Oak Lawn)

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                  One of the richest areas of Dallas is Oak Lawn. There are many  apartments, condos, townhouses, and urban professionals. Good clubs, restaurants, and bars reign in the area and they are particularly attractive for the LGBT community. People aged 25 to 34 make up 15% of its population. The average income is $29,830 and $874 is the median rent. Crime Rate is below average and the Representative College is Southern Methodist University.

                  9. Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN (Best Neighborhood: North Loop)

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                    It used to be the city’s warehouse district. Now the North Loop is the area for its art scene with many bars, local restaurants, and shopping. Here, the median rent is $864, with residents enjoying an average median income of $33,511. Young people who are aged 25 to 34 constitute 14% of the residents.The crime rate is average and the representative college is the University of Minnesota.

                    10. San Diego, CA (Best Neighborhood: Little Italy)

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                      Wikimedia Commons

                      Downtown San Diego has a hilly area called Little Italy that has been re-gentrified. Now it’s the city’s main center for festivals, art galleries, retail shops, and Italian restaurants. People aged 25 to 34 make up 15% of its population. The median rent of $1,261 is easily settled by the residents whose average income is $30,196. Crime rate is low and the representative college is the University of San Diego.

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                      11. San Jose, CA (Best Neighborhood: Old Mountain View)

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                        Where do tech companies and a lot of restaurants, cafes, and shops reside? Right . . . Old Mountain View. It has great views of the Santa Cruz mountains. At Old Mountain View, 15% of the population is aged 25 to 34 years old. They median income is $37,484. How about the median rent? It’s $1,454. Crime rate is low and the representative college is San Jose University.

                        12. Raleigh, NC (Best Neighborhood: Morrisville)

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                          Google Maps

                          Morrisville is scenic with picture-perfect parks. It’s a place full of activities geared towards young families with children. Organized community sports are common in Morrisville. Its multipurpose fields make it a true haven for a burgeoning starter families. Twenty five (25) to 34 years old professionals form 14% of the population. If a less than a thousand rent sounds good to you, you’ll be comfy in Morrisville; the median rent is $855. To cope with the standard of living there, you must come up with an average median income of $31,899. Crime rate is low and the representative college is North Carolina State University.

                          13.Seattle, WA (Best Neighborhood: Eastlake)

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                            Wikipedia Commons

                            Lake Union graces Eastlake on its eastern shore. It’s considered one of the most appealing residential areas in the U.S. because of the combination of small businesses, apartments, and houses. This pretty neighborhood houses numerous boutiques, bakeries, and restaurants. The median rent is higher than Victorian Village at $1,033 with the population averaging a median income of $34,199. Twenty-five (25) to 34 year old professionals make up 15% of the population. Crime rate is low and the representative college is the University of Washington.

                            14. Columbus, O(Best Neighborhood: Victorian Village)

                            Victorian village

                              Wikipedia Commons

                              If you’re like me and you love living in a neighborhood among gorgeous houses turned into beautiful rented apartments, you’ll love staying in Victorian Village. A pretty place northwest of downtown Columbus, it counts Ohio State University as one of its famous neighbors. Fourteen percent (14%) of the residents are aged 25 to 34. Median rent is $777. Make sure you have an average income of $28,977, if you plan to make it your home. Crime rate is average and the representative college is Ohio State University.

                              15. Pittsburgh, PA (Best Neighborhood: Shadyside)

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                                Wikipedia Commons

                                If you love being around historic residences, this is your place. Shadyside has that historic look that appeals to people who appreciate buildings with charachter. It is located at the east end of Pittsburgh and offers numerous upscale stores and boutiques as well as a number of cozy restaurants. Shadyside’s median rent is $672. If you can derive a annual income that sings to the tune of $25, 000 to $26,000, you’ll have no problem living there; Shadyside’s median income is $25,520. Twenty-five (25) to 34 year-old workers account for 11% of the population.

                                16. Phoenix, AZ (Best Neighborhood: Tempe)

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                                  Wikipedia Commons

                                  Tempe is situated in the East Valley section of Phoenix. It is an artsy and friendly area with numerous bars and a lake that is perfect for outdoor activities. 14% of its population is aged 25 to 34, and it has a median rent of $934. The average income is $29,139. Crime rate is below average and the representative college is Arizona State University.

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                                  17. Los Angeles, CA (Best Neighborhood: Palms)

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                                    Palms is located at the west side of Los Angeles. It is one of the oldest neighborhoods in L.A., providing several apartment buildings, and offers Indian and Pakistani restaurants. The median rent in Palms is $1,218 with residents averaging an income of $26,482. Fourteen percent (14%) of the population is composed of 25 to 34 year olds. The crime rate is low and the representative college is the University of Southern California.

                                    18. Charlotte, N.C. (Best Neighborhood: Third Ward)

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                                      The Third Ward has charming town-homes and beautiful Sycamore trees. It has a dog park, a community garden, and is proudly family-oriented. Fourteen percent (14%) of its population is aged 25 to 34, and it has a median rent of $818. The average income of residents is $28,494. The crime rate is below average and the representative college is the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.

                                      19. New Orleans, LA (Best Neighborhood: Lower Garden District)

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                                        Google Maps

                                        The Lower Garden District has been rapidly gentrifying recently and has some of the most beautiful residences in the city. More shops and bars have been opening lately to cater to a younger crowd. Median rent in the Lower Garden District is $913. The population’s average median income is $25,297. Thirteen (13%) of residents are people aged 25 to 34 years old. The crime rate is below average and the representative college is Tulane University.

                                        20. Salt Lake City, UT (Best Neighborhood: East Central)

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                                          Google Maps

                                          East Central has a unique and diverse community with numerous wide grassy parks and great shopping. The city’s transit options is within walking distance. People aged 25 to 34 constitute 17% of its residents. Median rent is $852. Average income is $27,561. Crime rate, however, is a little above average. The representative college is the University of Utah.

                                          21. Houston, TX (Best Neighborhood: Midtown)

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                                            Midtown is in southwest downtown Houston. There you will find lots of bars, bánh mì restaurants, shopping centers, and other attractions for young people. The median rent is $860. Average median income is $28,306. Fifteen (15%) of the population is composed of 25 to 34 year-old professionals who are either gainfully employed or running a business. Crime rate is average and the representative college is the University of Houston.

                                            22. Indianapolis, IN (Best Neighborhood: Fishers)

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                                              Google Maps

                                              A suburb of Indianapolis, Fishers, is one of the most affordable neighborhoods in the U.S. It’s nearby a shopping center and a reservoir where people can fish and water-ski. Fourteen percent (14%) of its residents are aged 25 to 34. Median rent is $763 and the average income is $28,664. The crime rate is average and the representative college is Indiana University and Purdue University.

                                              23. Richmond,VA (Best Neighborhood: Shockoe Bottom)

                                              Shockoe Bottom in Richmond, Va.

                                                Google Maps

                                                Shockoe Bottom is located east of downtown Richmond along the James River. It has become a major destination for nightlife, dining, and entertainment. Twenty-five (25) to 34 year old residents comprise 13% of its population. Median rent is $921. The average income is $30,324. Crime Rate is below average and the representative college is Virginia Commonwealth University.

                                                24. Orlando, FL (Best Neighborhood: Lake Eola Heights)

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                                                  Google Maps

                                                  Lake Eola Heights, a safe community in downtown Orlando, boasts of a nice selection of condos as well as historic homes. The median rent is $1,018. Residents are averaging a median income of $25,330. Like the rest of the locations featured here, 25 to 34 year-old individuals constitute 14% of the residents. Crime rate is above average and the representative college is the University of Central Florida.

                                                  25. Atlanta, GA (Best Neighborhood: Ardmore)

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                                                    Google Maps

                                                    Ardmore is a friendly residential neighborhood, proudly dog-oriented, and is well known for its gorgeous park. Fourteen percent (14%) of its population are people aged 25 to 34. Median rent is $937 and the average income is $29,863. The crime rate is a little higher than average and the representative college is Georgia Tech.

                                                    Featured photo credit: New York, NY/Photo Credit: robbarry via Compfight cc via compfight.com

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                                                    Last Updated on August 16, 2018

                                                    10 Huge Differences Between A Boss And A Leader

                                                    10 Huge Differences Between A Boss And A Leader

                                                    When you try to think of a leader at your place of work, you might think of your boss – you know, the supervisor in the tasteful office down the hall.

                                                    However, bosses are not the only leaders in the office, and not every boss has mastered the art of excellent leadership. Maybe the best leader you know is the co-worker sitting at the desk next to yours who is always willing to loan out her stapler and help you problem solve.

                                                    You see, a boss’ main priority is to efficiently cross items off of the corporate to-do list, while a true leader both completes tasks and works to empower and motivate the people he or she interacts with on a daily basis.

                                                    A leader is someone who works to improve things instead of focusing on the negatives. People acknowledge the authority of a boss, but people cherish a true leader.

                                                    Puzzled about what it takes to be a great leader? Let’s take a look at the difference between a boss and a leader, and why cultivating quality leadership skills is essential for people who really want to make a positive impact.

                                                    1. Leaders are compassionate human beings; bosses are cold.

                                                    It can be easy to equate professionalism with robot-like impersonal behavior. Many bosses stay holed up in their offices and barely ever interact with staff.

                                                    Even if your schedule is packed, you should always make time to reach out to the people around you. Remember that when you ask someone to share how they are feeling, you should be prepared to be vulnerable and open in your communication as well.

                                                    Does acting human at the office sound silly? It’s not.

                                                    A lack of compassion in the office leads to psychological turmoil, whereas positive connection leads to healthier staff.[1]

                                                    If people feel that you are being open, honest and compassionate with them, they will feel able to approach your office with what is on their minds, leading to a more productive and stress-free work environment.

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                                                    2. Leaders say “we”; bosses say “I”.

                                                    Practice developing a team-first mentality when thinking and speaking. In meetings, talk about trying to meet deadlines as a team instead of using accusatory “you” phrases. This makes it clear that you are a part of the team, too, and that you are willing to work hard and support your team members.

                                                    Let me explain:

                                                    A “we” mentality shifts the office dynamic from “trying to make the boss happy” to a spirit of teamwork, goal-setting, and accomplishment.

                                                    A “we” mentality allows for the accountability and community that is essential in the modern day workplace.

                                                    3. Leaders develop and invest in people; bosses use people.

                                                    Unfortunately, many office climates involve people using others to get what they want or to climb the corporate ladder. This is another example of the “me first” mentality that is so toxic in both office environments and personal relationships.

                                                    Instead of using others or focusing on your needs, think about how you can help other people grow.

                                                    Use your building blocks of compassion and team-mentality to stay attuned to the needs of others note the areas in which you can help them develop. A great leader wants to see his or her people flourish.

                                                    Make a list of ways you can invest in your team members to help them develop personally and professionally, and then take action!

                                                    4. Leaders respect people; bosses are fear-mongering.

                                                    Earning respect from everyone on your team will take time and commitment, but the rewards are worth every ounce of effort.

                                                    A boss who is a poor leader may try to control the office through fear and bully-like behavior. Employees who are petrified about their performance or who feel overwhelmed and stressed by unfair deadlines are probably working for a boss who uses a fear system instead of a respect system.

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                                                    What’s the bottom line?

                                                    Work to build respect among your team by treating everyone with fairness and kindness. Maintain a positive tone and stay reliable for those who approach you for help.

                                                    5. Leaders give credit where it’s due; bosses only take credits.

                                                    Looking for specific ways to gain respect from your colleagues and employees? There is no better place to start than with the simple act of giving credit where it is due.

                                                    Don’t be tempted to take credit for things you didn’t do, and always go above and beyond to generously acknowledge those who worked on a project and performed well.

                                                    You might be wondering how you can get started:

                                                    • Begin by simply noticing which team member contributes what during your next project at work.
                                                    • If possible, make mental notes. Remember that these notes should not be about ways in which team members are failing, but about ways in which they are excelling.
                                                    • Depending on your leadership style, let people know how well they are doing either in private one-on-one meetings or in a group setting. Be honest and generous in your communication about a person’s performance.

                                                    6. Leaders see delegation as their best friend; bosses see it as an enemy.

                                                    If delegation is a leader’s best friend, then micromanagement is the enemy.

                                                    Delegation equates to trust and micromanagement equates to distrust. Nothing is more frustrating for an employee than feeling that his or her every movement is being critically observed.

                                                    Encourage trust in your office by delegating important tasks and acknowledging that your people are capable, smart individuals who can succeed!

                                                    Delegation is a great way to cash in on the positive benefits of a psychological phenomenon called a self-fulfilling prophecy. In a self-fulfilling prophecy, a person’s expectations of another person can cause the expectations to be fulfilled.[2]

                                                    In other words, if you truly believe that your team member can handle a project or task, he or she is more likely to deliver.

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                                                    Learn how to delegate in my other article:

                                                    How to Delegate Work (the Definitive Guide for Successful Leaders)

                                                    7. Leaders work hard; bosses let others do the work.

                                                    Delegation is not an excuse to get out of hard work. Instead of telling people to go accomplish the hardest work alone, make it clear that you are willing to pitch in and help with the hardest work of all when the need arises.

                                                    Here’s the deal:

                                                    Showing others that you work hard sets the tone for your whole team and will spur them on to greatness.

                                                    The next time you catch yourself telling someone to “go”, a.k.a accomplish a difficult task alone, change your phrasing to “let’s go”, showing that you are totally willing to help and support.

                                                    8. Leaders think long-term; bosses think short-term.

                                                    A leader who only utilizes short-term thinking is someone who cannot be prepared or organized for the future. Your colleagues or staff members need to know that they can trust you to have a handle on things not just this week, but next month or even next year.

                                                    Display your long-term thinking skills in group talks and meetings by sharing long-term hopes or concerns. Create plans for possible scenarios and be prepared for emergencies.

                                                    For example, if you know that you are losing someone on your team in a few months, be prepared to share a clear plan of how you and the remaining team members can best handle the change and workload until someone new is hired.

                                                    9. Leaders are like your colleagues; bosses are just bosses.

                                                    Another word for colleague is collaborator. Make sure your team knows that you are “one of them” and that you want to collaborate or work side by side.

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                                                    Not getting involved in the going ons of the office is a mistake because you will miss out on development and connection opportunities.

                                                    As our regular readers know, I love to remind people of the importance of building routines into each day. Create a routine that encourages you to leave your isolated office and collaborate with others. Spark healthy habits that benefit both you and your co-workers.

                                                    10. Leaders put people first; bosses put results first.

                                                    Bosses without crucial leadership training may focus on process and results instead of people. They may stick to a pre-set systems playbook even when employees voice new ideas or concerns.

                                                    Ignoring people’s opinions for the sake of company tradition like this is never truly beneficial to an organization.

                                                    Here’s what I mean by process over people:

                                                    Some organizations focus on proper structures or systems as their greatest assets instead of people. I believe that people lend real value to an organization, and that focusing on the development of people is a key ingredient for success in leadership.

                                                    Learning to be a leader is an ongoing adventure.

                                                    This list of differences makes it clear that, unlike an ordinary boss, a leader is able to be compassionate, inclusive, generous, and hard-working for the good of the team.

                                                    Instead of being a stereotypical scary or micromanaging-obsessed boss, a quality leader is able to establish an atmosphere of respect and collaboration.

                                                    Whether you are new to your work environment or a seasoned administrator, these leadership traits will help you get a jump start so that you can excel as a leader and positively impact the people around you.

                                                    For more inspiration and guidance, you can even start keeping tabs on some of the world’s top leadership experts. With an adventurous and positive attitude, anyone can learn good leadership.

                                                    Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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