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The Importance of Direct Mail to Your Company’s Marketing

The Importance of Direct Mail to Your Company’s Marketing

With the growth of technology and the internet, there has been a steady decline in direct mail marketing campaigns. However, there is a strong indication that a company could greatly benefit from implementing an integrated marketing approach. Touching a customer across multiple channels will not only increase your branding, but it also keeps your company top-of-mind for your potential clients. Research also indicates that direct mail is one of the cheapest and most effective marketing strategies. Here are some of the benefits to direct mail and how it can be used in conjunction with your other marketing strategies.

High Conversions

sending letters

    Image via Flickr by Sam Saturday

    The United States Postal Service reported that 98% of consumers bring their mail in the day it is delivered, and 77% sift through it immediatly. The ability to reach the consumer is one of the hardest parts of marketing, so direct mail, unlike email marketing, allows you to allude that pesky spam folder and get in front of your target.

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    Utilize this opportunity to mention an upcoming sale or event. Evoke a response or drive that customer to your website for more information. This will allow you the opportunity to communicate your message across a variety of different channels.

    Flexibility

    Whiskas Coupons

      Image via Flickr by gegeyteaghea

      Direct mail is flexible in that it can serve a variety of different goals. It can be used as an invitation or short term promotional tool, like in the form of a coupon or sales collateral. This would be an excellent approach for a new company that is looking to drive initial use or generate quick revenue. However, this type of direct mail is not a long term sustainable approach for your marketing campaigns.

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      Direct mail can also be used as a reminder or informational tool. This is perfect for companies not looking to generate short term sales, but rather establish a long-term relationships with their clients. These mailers are usually very personalized and serve the purpose of reminding the client about their relationship. They could be the form of birthday cards or other holiday reminders, or even Newsletters that give that individual a glimpse into the inner workings of your company.

      Direct mail can also be used as a tool to gather more information about your customer or your company; surveys and questionnaires are a great way to leverage direct mail, serving as an information gateway to your customers and also strengthens the relationship by receiving their opinions. You can also utilize this opportunity to gain more information such as email addresses, phone numbers, or other personal information that may be outdated or unknown.

      Effective and Efficient

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      targeting

        Direct mail is one of the most measurable forms of marketing—you can easily record the number of mailers that are sent out, and use coupons or codes to record response rates.

        Not only is it measurable, but it also allows you to easily target your recipients  Unlike other forms of marketing that can hit outside of your target market, direct mail is personalized to the point that you are able to select a geographical target, demographical, or even physiological group.

        Use Direct Mail in an Integrated Approach

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          The Direct Marketing Association reports that communicating to customers across multiple channels will greatly increases the customers value.

          • Across Two Channels : Increases the customers value 20-60%
          • Across Three Channels : Increases the customers value 60-125%

          Direct mail is a great tool when used in conjunction with other marketing campaigns. It can utilize a message, develop a brand, generate short term return, or even gather important information.The benefits of this approach on your marketing campaigns is greater than the alternatives.

          A successful marketing campaign depends on a variety of factors, but essentially, the process hinges on the ability to reach the target market, effectively communicate a message, and monitor the results. Even though there is a trend towards digital marketing and online media, direct mail still remains a very important part of the marketing mix and should be a part of your business.

          Do you think direct mail impacts your purchasing behavior?

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          Last Updated on September 28, 2020

          How to Change Careers Successfully When It Seems too Late

          How to Change Careers Successfully When It Seems too Late

          The wake-up call often comes when you least expect it. Maybe you’re enjoying a relaxing get-together with your old college buddies when someone turns to you and says, “Wow, I never thought you’d become an investment banker. I always thought you’d write a novel!” If this leaves you wondering how to change careers, you’re not alone.

          Before you know it, you find yourself remembering your old dreams—and comparing them to the career field where you are now. Life rarely goes according to plan. Marriage, kids, and grandkids often come earlier than imagined—or later.

          Maybe you pursued one career path because you were considered the breadwinner, but now someone else in the family is the breadwinner. Conversely, maybe you landed a job, thinking you’d stay for six months, and now you’ve been there for sixteen years.

          A recent report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics pointed out that “baby boomers held an average of 12.3 jobs from ages 18 to 52″[1]. For millennials, who are more technologically apt, that number is likely to be much higher.

          As this proves, it’s perfectly normal to change careers and begin a job search even when it seems too late! Steering your way through a career change is part calculation, part chance, and part leap-of-faith.

          If you feel stuck and are ready for a career change, take these steps to guide you.

          Step 1: Be Mentally Prepared

          These points can help you master the psychological aspects of a career change at any age.

          Now or Never Is a Fallacy

          For most professionals, there is no cut-off age for striking out in a new direction. People do it at all stages of their careers.

          If you’ve ever dreamed of leaving a large company to start your own business, you are not alone. Similarly, thousands of entrepreneurs and people working for one-man shops decide each year that they’d like to work for larger organizations.

          You’ll find hordes of baby boomers looking for a redo alongside mobs of GenXers and Millennials—especially as the boomers now remain in the workforce longer than their predecessors.

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          Your Career Is not a Straight Line From A to B

          You don’t have to have your career trajectory completely decided from the start. In fact, that’s an unrealistic expectation, no matter how methodical you are.

          People change. Industries merge, morph, and in some cases, disappear. Careers rarely follow the straight and narrow.

          Many careers can be compared to journeys—there are the adventurous patches, boring patches, downright scary patches, and the hills and valleys, too. The trick is to try to have a little fun while you’re charting out your various careers.

          Don’t panic if you find you need to change your career. It may take some work as you sort through job posts, write cover letters, and pursue your dream job, but you’re up for it.

          Career Changers Are Among Good Company

          Consider these well-known trailblazers whose careers took a radical turn:

          Jeff Bezos, CEO of Amazon.com, studied computer science and electrical engineering at Princeton, went on to establish himself as a Wall Street prodigy, then quit to launch Amazon.com.

          Sara Blakely, a billionaire businesswoman, was a fax machine salesperson before creating her signature slim wear line, Spanx.

          Jonah Peretti, co-founder of the media sites Huffington Post and BuzzFeed, initially taught computer science to middle schoolers.

          Be Ready to Take on the Naysayers

          Expect plenty of advice—usually of the discouraging kind—from friends and family when they learn that you’re exploring a career change. Those you know best are often the most vocal in trying to thwart your plans.

          Be prepared to field a flurry of pessimistic conjecture and doomsday scenarios. Know, though, that when your loved ones question your judgment, they’re not necessarily doubting your talent but trying to look out for your wellbeing. Stepping out of your comfort zone will make anyone close to you uncomfortable.

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          Keep in mind that pessimists avoid the unknown, while optimists invite new challenges. Above all, believe in yourself and follow your instincts. Don’t let your fear of change paralyze you from seeking out your new career path.

          Project an aura of enthusiasm, energy, and passion. You’ll find it’s contagious.

          Step 2: Be Proactive

          These tips can help you master the practical aspects of changing careers at any age.

          Take Baby Steps

          Ease into your new direction. Start building the skills you’ll need to make the switch.

          Find out what skills you will need, and do whatever it takes to add them to your skills arsenal. Make the time to invest in additional training.

          Start by devoting a half-day each week to your new pursuit until you’re ready to confidently make a move.

          Clearly define where you want to go and what you’ll need to do to get there. Take an inventory of your strengths. Read trade magazines, and study up on industry trends.

          Volunteer

          Charitable organizations are often looking for volunteers to help them with their outreach, social media, and engagement. You can show up without the requisite skills and learn as you go in a fun, convivial, low-pressure environment, which will help you expand your experience and skills.

          Take Online Courses

          Today, LinkedIn and many other providers offer online courses in everything from accounting software to time management to mastering Excel. For extra credit, see if you can find classes that award online badges for completing each course.

          Don’t be shy about adding these certificates to your online profile. Keep your profile fresh by adding more and more skills to it.

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          Take a Temp Job

          Depending on your field, it may be possible to freelance at a company where you learn on the job.

          Remember that you can’t just show up at a potential employer’s claiming you have the skills. Taking a temporary job that allows you to polish your skills is proof that you’re serious about your career change.

          Network!

          Build a family tree of contacts. Explore beyond the main branches of your work acquaintances, industry groups, and social contacts. Join your alumni organization. Tell everyone.

          Ask friends and friends-of-friends to meet you for coffee to explain what it is they do and tell you which skills you’ll need to succeed in your chosen field[2].

          When you want to learn how to change careers, start by networking!

            If you have friends or associates with ties to the organizations where you want to work, ask your contacts to make an introduction. The majority of today’s jobs are found through one’s own networks. When jobs open up, companies invite informal recommendations from internal and external channels.

            Step 3: Take It Online

            This last step can help you master the online aspects of a career change at any age.

            Develop an Online Presence in the Field of Your Dreams

            Reconfiguring your online presence will be a critical step in your career change. Fine-tune your digital identity to reflect your new direction, tailoring your profile to the role and industry you’re after. Include keywords that are relevant to the industry so that recruiters can find you.

            Craft a clever personal statement that states your interests, your values, and your dreams. Once you’ve zeroed in on your message, also pick and choose which outlets make the most sense for it.

            Will your personal statement resonate on LinkedIn? Or is it highly visual—making it a better fit for Instagram?

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            Polish your sites until they gleam, then get active so others take notice. Add insightful content to your social media pages that goes deeper than the information on your resume, such as commentaries on something taking place in your newly chosen field.

            For more on how to build an online presence, check out this article.

            Final Thoughts

            Americans spend 1,800 hours or more each year working. That’s nearly one-third of your life, and it goes without saying that your job satisfaction and career goals have a great bearing on your life’s happiness barometer.

            Set out to intentionally pursue career satisfaction, looking for opportunities to fine-tune your working life so that you find fulfillment.

            If playing the piano is your personal bliss, could you meld your love of music with your clinical psychology background and find a job using music to promote healing? Perhaps there’s a foundation that would fund you in a multiyear study.

            Or, if you’re a movie buff for whom every encounter has the makings of a screenplay, why not sign up for an evening class and see if your years of writing advertising copy could morph into a career move into the film industry?

            Achieving your career change successfully will occur when you mentally prepare, take a proactive approach, and mine your personal and online networks. The pay-off will be in a life well-lived in a successful career.

            More Tips on How to Change Careers

            Featured photo credit: Jason Strull via unsplash.com

            Reference

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