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The 20 Best Work-From-Home Jobs You Should Consider Taking

The 20 Best Work-From-Home Jobs You Should Consider Taking

As someone who works from home and runs an LLC writing business from the comfort of her own living room and bedroom, I can attest that having one of those much ballyhooed “zero-second commute” work-from-home jobs comes with plenty of benefits.

If you’re ready to delve into the work-at-home world, consider these job options – some of which require self-employment, others representing positions within firms that allow their workers to telecommute.

1. Author

A bevy of self-published author millionaires, such as writer Hugh Howey, are leading the charge and showing others that by bringing in more than $1 million in book sales via Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publishing system, the from-home task is nothing to scoff at. His author earnings reports have readers salivating over how they, too, can become the next rich author – especially as the online retail giant makes it easier and easier for everyday folks to publish their tomes from Microsoft Word documents straight onto the Kindle platform.

2. Administrative Associate

The average salary for an administrative associate is $45,000 – and the duties tend to include a wide variety of skills based on the industry. However, most folks filling this position need excellent interpersonal skills, as well as a high level of organization and communication. Companies like Dell allow their administrative associates to work both on campus and remotely.

3. Business Development Executive

Expect to come equipped with a minimum of a bachelor’s degree for this position, with certain firms such as Xerox preferring a master’s level degree for the role that requires developing strategies to sell products and services to others. The average salary range is $80,000 for this role.

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4. Virtual Assistant

The role of virtual assistant exploded onto the scene when author Tim Ferriss described how he hired folks from all over the world to perform everyday tasks for him. Whether you find yourself researching the best CD rates for a client in Australia, or scheduling appointments for a business owner in New York, you can find a plethora of virtual assistant jobs on sites like Upwork with a wide range of pay.

5. Travel Counselor

Surprisingly, large firms like American Express offer full-time, work-at-home jobs (see jobs.americanexpress.com) such as that of a travel counselor, which focuses on taking customer calls and helping to create “memorable travel experiences” for cardholders. The salary range for such a position is reportedly anywhere from $35,583 to $51,000 annually.

6. Customer Service Representative

Companies like Enterprise Rent-a-Car have work-from-home positions available starting at $12 per hour, with paid virtual 4 -to 5-week training classes. It makes sense that more firms would seek out professional, detail-oriented workers for jobs like these that may require lots of phone contact with customers, but don’t require the overhead expense of all of their customer service reps needing to be under one corporate roof.

7. YouTube Video Creator

Before you skip down to the next tip, consider the fact that Felix Kjellberg, better known as “PewDiePie” to his almost 30 million YouTube fans, raked in $4 million in 2013 from the ad revenue generated by his viral videos. It’s time to pick up your smartphone and start uploading.

8. Software Developer

The information technology field led the charge when it came to offering work-at-home positions, and these days, firms like IBM offer the potential for certain employees to work from home if necessary. Based on the level of programming language knowledge, software developers can earn anywhere from $55,190 to $138,880 annually.

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9. Illustrator

If you have a penchant for drawing, you could get your feet wet by selling your services from home for anywhere from $5 per drawing on sites like Fiverr – all the way up thousands of dollars once you develop a following and reputation to provide artwork to clients willing to pay a lot more for your craft.

10. App Developer

Games like “Make it Rain” have made a pretty penny in the iTunes App Store and via others across the online world, at one point pulling in $50,000 per day. Users might be shocked to learn that you don’t even really need to know how to code in order to open up an app development company from your home. Websites like Udemy offer online courses that not only provide the basic code for various gaming apps, but also teach users how to “re-skin” them to make the code their own prior to submitting it to the app store and hopefully creating a cash cow.

11. Instagram Print-Selling Photographer

These days, photographers like Daniel Arnold can decide to sell his Instagram photos as prints and make $15,000 in one day. He’s not the only one turning IG pics into profit. Ryan Parillo is only 15 years old, but his stunning photos are commanding fame as well.

12. Freelance Writer

Forget the image of the starving artist, waxing in a state of depression all Hemingway-style with a glass of bourbon next to his typewriter. (It should be a mojito next to a MacBook Air.) Writers these days are finding so many clients seeking quality content that “Valerie M.” of Words You Want shows earnings of $427,601 in the last 12 months – and more than $2 million total and counting – as of this writing brought in through her words that clients obviously want.

13. Graphic Designer

The average graphic designer makes approximately $50,450 per year to create a wide array of graphics that may appear as logos on packaging or bucolic scenes on brochures. The job generally requires being creative and adept at softwares like Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator and others – and can involve you setting up shop and hanging out your own shingle, so to speak, in order to make yourself known via word of mouth or on job posting sites like Upwork and oDesk.

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14. Healthcare Worker

Choosing the option to “search career opportunities” on the Humana website and then selecting the “virtual/work at home” checkbox beneath their “work environment type” field turns up a bunch of jobs where working from home – at least a portion of the time – is a definite possibility. Certain positions listed include a compliance risk advisor, whose salary is approximately $62,000 per year. Other virtual roles listed, like an applications consultant, may command a salary of $77,400 on average.

15. SEO Specialist

Indeed states that SEO experts can bring in salaries of approximately $100,000 per year, and the great part about being a person who knows their way around the “search-engine optimization” field is that there are many people who are willing to pay them to help increase their website’s rankings and visibility in Google. Being very tech-focused, it’s a job that can be done from home as long as the SEO clients keep pouring in.

16. Google Trusted Photographer

Not all jobs being touted on the web as related to Google are scams. I personally know of one photographer who was accepted as a Google Trusted Photographer, and was able to earn an income by photographing various businesses to be displayed on the search engine’s results. Reports of these certified photographers earning $500 for one photo abound, along with the additional business that can come their way when local businesses want to buy more images and additional services.

17. Actuarial Consultant

Companies like Aetna hire actuarial consultants to work from home, as long as they are exceptionally equipped to handle the high level of strong analytical and in-depth data mining skills required for the job, which can pay from $52,000 to $112,500 per year.

18. Virtual Tutor

Websites like Tutor.com help connect people with a boatload of knowledge to share – such as experts in math, English, science and other subjects – with those who are willing to pay people to tutor them or their children, even on a virtual basis, because Skype has opened up a huge world for online teaching. While some tutors average approximately $16.20 per hour, reports of much higher amounts being paid have gone viral.

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19. Amazon Virtual Jobs

It sounds too good to be true, but Amazon actually has work-from-home jobs, those pegged with the “virtual location” text, whereby folks who live near the stated areas may garner a job as a regional brand advisor or a content acquisition manager, for example.

20. Telephone Representative

If you’re great on the phone, firms like Nestle still have work at home jobs for those willing to sell Gerber Life Insurance products. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that the media pay of customer service representative jobs akin to these are $30,580 per year, or $14.70 per hour.

With so many virtual jobs available and opening up due to the Internet bringing all the tools a person needs right to their home to successfully complete their work from within the walls of their own home, there’s almost no excuse not to begin a journey into working from home. Just change out of those pajamas, okay?

Featured photo credit: KaronBT via bigstockphoto.com

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Last Updated on August 16, 2018

10 Huge Differences Between A Boss And A Leader

10 Huge Differences Between A Boss And A Leader

When you try to think of a leader at your place of work, you might think of your boss – you know, the supervisor in the tasteful office down the hall.

However, bosses are not the only leaders in the office, and not every boss has mastered the art of excellent leadership. Maybe the best leader you know is the co-worker sitting at the desk next to yours who is always willing to loan out her stapler and help you problem solve.

You see, a boss’ main priority is to efficiently cross items off of the corporate to-do list, while a true leader both completes tasks and works to empower and motivate the people he or she interacts with on a daily basis.

A leader is someone who works to improve things instead of focusing on the negatives. People acknowledge the authority of a boss, but people cherish a true leader.

Puzzled about what it takes to be a great leader? Let’s take a look at the difference between a boss and a leader, and why cultivating quality leadership skills is essential for people who really want to make a positive impact.

1. Leaders are compassionate human beings; bosses are cold.

It can be easy to equate professionalism with robot-like impersonal behavior. Many bosses stay holed up in their offices and barely ever interact with staff.

Even if your schedule is packed, you should always make time to reach out to the people around you. Remember that when you ask someone to share how they are feeling, you should be prepared to be vulnerable and open in your communication as well.

Does acting human at the office sound silly? It’s not.

A lack of compassion in the office leads to psychological turmoil, whereas positive connection leads to healthier staff.[1]

If people feel that you are being open, honest and compassionate with them, they will feel able to approach your office with what is on their minds, leading to a more productive and stress-free work environment.

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2. Leaders say “we”; bosses say “I”.

Practice developing a team-first mentality when thinking and speaking. In meetings, talk about trying to meet deadlines as a team instead of using accusatory “you” phrases. This makes it clear that you are a part of the team, too, and that you are willing to work hard and support your team members.

Let me explain:

A “we” mentality shifts the office dynamic from “trying to make the boss happy” to a spirit of teamwork, goal-setting, and accomplishment.

A “we” mentality allows for the accountability and community that is essential in the modern day workplace.

3. Leaders develop and invest in people; bosses use people.

Unfortunately, many office climates involve people using others to get what they want or to climb the corporate ladder. This is another example of the “me first” mentality that is so toxic in both office environments and personal relationships.

Instead of using others or focusing on your needs, think about how you can help other people grow.

Use your building blocks of compassion and team-mentality to stay attuned to the needs of others note the areas in which you can help them develop. A great leader wants to see his or her people flourish.

Make a list of ways you can invest in your team members to help them develop personally and professionally, and then take action!

4. Leaders respect people; bosses are fear-mongering.

Earning respect from everyone on your team will take time and commitment, but the rewards are worth every ounce of effort.

A boss who is a poor leader may try to control the office through fear and bully-like behavior. Employees who are petrified about their performance or who feel overwhelmed and stressed by unfair deadlines are probably working for a boss who uses a fear system instead of a respect system.

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What’s the bottom line?

Work to build respect among your team by treating everyone with fairness and kindness. Maintain a positive tone and stay reliable for those who approach you for help.

5. Leaders give credit where it’s due; bosses only take credits.

Looking for specific ways to gain respect from your colleagues and employees? There is no better place to start than with the simple act of giving credit where it is due.

Don’t be tempted to take credit for things you didn’t do, and always go above and beyond to generously acknowledge those who worked on a project and performed well.

You might be wondering how you can get started:

  • Begin by simply noticing which team member contributes what during your next project at work.
  • If possible, make mental notes. Remember that these notes should not be about ways in which team members are failing, but about ways in which they are excelling.
  • Depending on your leadership style, let people know how well they are doing either in private one-on-one meetings or in a group setting. Be honest and generous in your communication about a person’s performance.

6. Leaders see delegation as their best friend; bosses see it as an enemy.

If delegation is a leader’s best friend, then micromanagement is the enemy.

Delegation equates to trust and micromanagement equates to distrust. Nothing is more frustrating for an employee than feeling that his or her every movement is being critically observed.

Encourage trust in your office by delegating important tasks and acknowledging that your people are capable, smart individuals who can succeed!

Delegation is a great way to cash in on the positive benefits of a psychological phenomenon called a self-fulfilling prophecy. In a self-fulfilling prophecy, a person’s expectations of another person can cause the expectations to be fulfilled.[2]

In other words, if you truly believe that your team member can handle a project or task, he or she is more likely to deliver.

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Learn how to delegate in my other article:

How to Delegate Work (the Definitive Guide for Successful Leaders)

7. Leaders work hard; bosses let others do the work.

Delegation is not an excuse to get out of hard work. Instead of telling people to go accomplish the hardest work alone, make it clear that you are willing to pitch in and help with the hardest work of all when the need arises.

Here’s the deal:

Showing others that you work hard sets the tone for your whole team and will spur them on to greatness.

The next time you catch yourself telling someone to “go”, a.k.a accomplish a difficult task alone, change your phrasing to “let’s go”, showing that you are totally willing to help and support.

8. Leaders think long-term; bosses think short-term.

A leader who only utilizes short-term thinking is someone who cannot be prepared or organized for the future. Your colleagues or staff members need to know that they can trust you to have a handle on things not just this week, but next month or even next year.

Display your long-term thinking skills in group talks and meetings by sharing long-term hopes or concerns. Create plans for possible scenarios and be prepared for emergencies.

For example, if you know that you are losing someone on your team in a few months, be prepared to share a clear plan of how you and the remaining team members can best handle the change and workload until someone new is hired.

9. Leaders are like your colleagues; bosses are just bosses.

Another word for colleague is collaborator. Make sure your team knows that you are “one of them” and that you want to collaborate or work side by side.

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Not getting involved in the going ons of the office is a mistake because you will miss out on development and connection opportunities.

As our regular readers know, I love to remind people of the importance of building routines into each day. Create a routine that encourages you to leave your isolated office and collaborate with others. Spark healthy habits that benefit both you and your co-workers.

10. Leaders put people first; bosses put results first.

Bosses without crucial leadership training may focus on process and results instead of people. They may stick to a pre-set systems playbook even when employees voice new ideas or concerns.

Ignoring people’s opinions for the sake of company tradition like this is never truly beneficial to an organization.

Here’s what I mean by process over people:

Some organizations focus on proper structures or systems as their greatest assets instead of people. I believe that people lend real value to an organization, and that focusing on the development of people is a key ingredient for success in leadership.

Learning to be a leader is an ongoing adventure.

This list of differences makes it clear that, unlike an ordinary boss, a leader is able to be compassionate, inclusive, generous, and hard-working for the good of the team.

Instead of being a stereotypical scary or micromanaging-obsessed boss, a quality leader is able to establish an atmosphere of respect and collaboration.

Whether you are new to your work environment or a seasoned administrator, these leadership traits will help you get a jump start so that you can excel as a leader and positively impact the people around you.

For more inspiration and guidance, you can even start keeping tabs on some of the world’s top leadership experts. With an adventurous and positive attitude, anyone can learn good leadership.

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

Reference

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