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Job Hunting Zombie Style (What!?)

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Job Hunting Zombie Style (What!?)

Have you noticed that those tenacious, reanimated “Walkers” from AMC’s hit show The Walking Dead are usually more successful than not? They remind me of the mythical motto attributed to postal carriers: “Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds.” Perhaps that description (or epitaph in this case) also applies to our Walkers. So begs the question: Can we learn anything from them regarding the job hunt?” I think we can.

Well-Defined Focus

If we think about the Walkers’ goals, we see that they know what they want and are singularly motivated. It’s simple; they “live” to eat. The living dead have a hunger that can’t be satisfied. Whether you are looking for a job because you aren’t happy with the one you’re in or you don’t have a job and you want one, the strategy is easy: Be The Zombie.

Tip 1: Increase self-awareness.

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Take some time to answer this question: What are five things that I can bring to a company? Jot those down (or better yet, add them to your job-hunting Notebook in Evernote—an indispensable job searching tool), then begin to view these five abilities of yours as marketable assets. Next, hone your search in terms of these keywords as you scan for job openings in newspapers, online job boards, or wherever you scavenge for flesh, er…I mean employment. For example, if one of your assets is “strong communication skills,” look for terms and concepts in a job posting where communication is key.

Once this process is finished, it’s time to beef up your resume (while remaining truthful of course) so that it will reflect those communication skills as well as the other four strengths you identified. If your education strongly supports your five abilities, put it at the top of your resume and list some specific ways the time you invested in school helped develop your talents in these areas. If your work history more strongly highlights your five assets, lead with that and make sure you pepper those keywords into a vivid description of the work you have done. Finally, before you land an interview, research the companies you most want to work for and do your best to understand what they need and how your skills are a match. Prepare interesting stories from your professional history that showcase your five areas of strength.

Knowing who you are and what you are about is important but remember this: The stray Walker almost always loses his head in the end. Keep reading to maximize resources such as your friends, family, and community.

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Herd Mentality (a.k.a. Networking)

Do you remember the scenes from the Walking Dead’s Season 2 finale, “Beside the Dying Fire?” The farm that had served as a semi-safe haven was overrun by hoards of Walkers. The sheer number of hungry undead was a Game Changer that scattered the fierce band of heroes. To get the best job at the best salary rate, you need a village, your village, to help you.

Tip 2: Prepare your references.

Keep your head in the game with a Walker-like mindset. Keep your five assets handy when you talk to people in your social circles. Ask your closest friends, family, and colleagues for examples of how they have seen you live these five skills in your personal and professional life. When you ask them for letters of references or for permission to put them on your resume (and you should get permission), ask them to speak to these strengths with clear examples when they write your letter or speak to the recruiter/interviewer.

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Now that you’re hungry and you’ve surrounded yourself with others who can support your career goals, you need to stand out—but not too much.

Look Alive

How many times have we witnessed that tense moment when a character is walking down a dark hallway all gussied up with corpses that appear to be dead, really dead, and then one of the Damned lurches with outstretched arms, open-mouth, gurgling, and lands a fresh meal. Sure, Walkers who prey together, stay together but in the end, it’s your mouth you’re trying to feed. The true art of finding a job is balancing the ability to appear normal and safe but at the same time show that you have an edge that makes you stand above the rest.

Tip 3: Curate your brand.

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Way back in Season 1, Rick and Glenn adorned themselves in zombie flesh in order to pass through a Walker herd undetected. Why? Because Walkers are wholly uninteresting to each other. When you are job hunting, you need to lose the stench of unfamiliarity and be able to be recognized by the person who is pursuing you.

Make sure you have good online hygiene by using Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and the rest to promote the five assets that you identified back in Tip 1. Blog and post about those interesting stories where your five assets came through. Share noteworthy content and connect to influencers in your field so that you make social media work for you and not against you. And take heart, even if your online identity is currently a little shaky, it is easier (and cheaper) to control what potential employers will find about you by populating the web with what you want others to see rather than trying to erase the older, embarrassing content.

Thankfully, we don’t live in a post zombie apocalypse but it is a dog eat dog world out there. Get to work on these three tips, stay relaxed, and enjoy the hunt!

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Featured photo credit:  pallid zombie against dark background via Shutterstock

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Last Updated on November 15, 2021

20 Ways to Describe Yourself in a Job Interview

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20 Ways to Describe Yourself in a Job Interview

“Please describe yourself in a few words”.

It’s the job interview of your life and you need to come up with something fast. Mental pictures of words are mixing in your head and your tongue tastes like alphabet soup. You mutter words like “deterministic” or “innovativity” and you realize you’re drenched in sweat. You wish you had thought about this. You wish you had read this post before.

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    Image Credit: Career Employer

    Here are 20 sentences that you could use when you are asked to describe yourself. Choose the ones that describe you the best.

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    “I am someone who…”:

    1. “can adapt to any situation. I thrive in a fluctuating environment and I transform unexpected obstacles into stepping stones for achievements.”
    2. “consistently innovates to create value. I find opportunities where other people see none: I turn ideas into projects, and projects into serial success.”
    3. “has a very creative mind. I always have a unique perspective when approaching an issue due to my broad range of interests and hobbies. Creativity is the source of differentiation and therefore, at the root of competitive advantage.”
    4. “always has an eye on my target. I endeavour to deliver high-quality work on time, every time. Hiring me is the only real guarantee for results.”
    5. “knows this job inside and out. With many years of relevant experience, there is no question whether I will be efficient on the job. I can bring the best practices to the company.”
    6. “has a high level of motivation to work here. I have studied the entire company history and observed its business strategies. Since I am also a long-time customer, I took the opportunity to write this report with some suggestions for how to improve your services.”
    7. “has a pragmatic approach to things. I don’t waste time talking about theory or the latest buzz words of the bullshit bingo. Only one question matters to me: ‘Does it work or not?'”
    8. “takes work ethics very seriously. I do what I am paid for, and I do it well.”
    9. “can make decisions rapidly if needed. Everybody can make good decisions with sufficient time and information. The reality of our domain is different. Even with time pressure and high stakes, we need to move forward by taking charge and being decisive. I can do that.”
    10. “is considered to be ‘fun.’ I believe that we are way more productive when we are working with people with which we enjoy spending time. When the situation gets tough with a customer, a touch of humour can save the day.”
    11. “works as a real team-player. I bring the best out of the people I work with and I always do what I think is best for the company.”
    12. “is completely autonomous. I won’t need to be micromanaged. I won’t need to be trained. I understand high-level targets and I know how to achieve them.”
    13. “leads people. I can unite people around a vision and motivate a team to excellence. I expect no more from the others than what I expect from myself.”
    14. “understands the complexity of advanced project management. It’s not just pushing triangles on a GANTT chart; it’s about getting everyone to sit down together and to agree on the way forward. And that’s a lot more complicated than it sounds.”
    15. “is the absolute expert in the field. Ask anybody in the industry. My name is on their lips because I wrote THE book on the subject.”
    16. “communicates extensively. Good, bad or ugly, I believe that open communication is the most important factor to reach an efficient organization.”
    17. “works enthusiastically. I have enough motivation for myself and my department. I love what I do, and it’s contagious.”
    18. “has an eye for details because details matter the most. How many companies have failed because of just one tiny detail? Hire me and you’ll be sure I’ll find that detail.”
    19. “can see the big picture. Beginners waste time solving minor issues. I understand the purpose of our company, tackle the real subjects and the top management will eventually notice it.”
    20. “is not like anyone you know. I am the candidate you would not expect. You can hire a corporate clone, or you can hire someone who will bring something different to the company. That’s me. “

    Featured photo credit: Tim Gouw via unsplash.com

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