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How to Prepare for a Layoff

How to Prepare for a Layoff
Layoff Lethargy

    Lately, it seems like every day brings yet another headline about impending corporate job cuts. Maybe you’ve even heard rumors that your own company is planning to downsize. Could your job be at risk?

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    Unfortunately, in today’s world, no job is ever 100% secure. Layoffs have become standard operating procedure for many companies. They hire when business looks good and cut jobs when results fall short of estimates. And it often doesn’t matter how good you are at your job or how hard you work.

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    Nobody relishes the idea of becoming suddenly unemployed, but a layoff doesn’t have to be the end of the world. The key to minimizing the stress and negative fallout is to prepare now for the possibility of a pink slip.

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    Trust me, I speak from experience. In more than twelve years of working for large corporations, I’ve lived through countless downsizings, reorganizations, and mergers. In most cases, I survived to work another day. However, I twice found myself among those packing up their desks and turning in their employee IDs. The first time, I was caught unprepared. The second time, I was ready, willing and able to embrace my layoff for what it was — an opportunity to finally make a career change that I had been dreaming about for years.

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    Follow my advice and you too can make sure layoffs won’t knock you for a loop:

    1. Stay in the Game – First and foremost, never stop looking for new career opportunities – even if your current job feels comfortable and secure. You never know when your dream job might open up. Keep your resume updated and make sure that the right recruiters have your phone number. You should always have a passive job search in progress. That way, you’ll always enjoy a steady stream of job leads and you’ll have a head start on landing your next position if you get laid off. This may sound like obvious advice, but few people truly take it seriously until it’s too late. Don’t allow yourself to be lulled into a false sense of security. When the layoff rumors start buzzing, goose your passive job search and get a little more active about exploring your options.
    2. Demonstrate Your Value – To increase your odds of hanging onto your current position, do whatever you can to show your manager the value that you provide. This is no time to be modest. Make sure you document your contributions and ensure that your boss understands how much harder her job would be without you.
    3. Don’t Take Any of It Personally – While it doesn’t hurt to demonstrate your value (see above), keep in mind that even the most valuable employees can be laid off. Layoff decisions are based on many factors. Sometimes, it’s about who was hired last. Sometimes, it’s about who makes the most money. Sometimes, there is no clear reason for who winds up on the chopping block. Don’t let rumors and speculation mess with your head. There’s only so much you can do to influence whether or not your name will show up on the layoff list. Don’t waste energy obsessing about what might happen. Channel your energy into figuring out your Plan B.
    4. Build Your Emergency Fund Cut back on discretionary purchases and put as much of your paycheck into your emergency savings fund as you can. Financial planners recommend that you should have enough in your emergency fund to cover your expenses for between three and six months. Hopefully, if you do get laid off, youll also have a severance package that will help you pay the bills. However, the more you can sock away, the more peace of mind youll have if the axe falls.
    5. Do Your Research Find out what kind of severance packages your company has offered in the past. Chances are that some of your colleagues have survived previous rounds of job cuts and can give you some general guidelines regarding what to expect. With a little luck, you might be pleasantly surprised at your companys generosity and realize theres no reason to panic.
    6. Do Your Housekeeping Often, when layoffs are announced, employees are rushed out the door and given little time to pack up and say goodbye. This is generally to prevent unpleasant scenes. However, if you think you might be facing a quick heave ho in the near future, you’d be smart to pack up your important possessions in advance. Make copies of work samples, performance reviews, and other key documents. Make sure you transfer all of your contacts to your personal computer. Start lugging home your extra pairs of shoes and family photos.
    7. Remember to Look on the Bright Side At worst, getting laid off is a temporary trial (and you will get through it, I promise). At best, your layoff may be the kick in the pants you need to find a more fulfilling job. I interviewed dozens of successful career changers for my forthcoming book and many of them spoke of being thankful for their layoffs (some of them volunteered or even begged to be let go). Their severance packages gave them the time and opportunity to pursue the careers of their dreams. If youve been unhappy in your current career path, this layoff may be your chance to explore your options.

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    Last Updated on June 25, 2019

    How to Ace an Interview: 10 Tips from a Professional Career Advisor

    How to Ace an Interview: 10 Tips from a Professional Career Advisor

    Wondering how to ace an interview? In this article, you will learn everything you need to nail your dream job — from resume submission to the end of the interview cycle.

    In order to land a job interview, you must start with submitting a great resume. Submitting resumes is generally done by, “apply now”, the way many apply for consideration to a job requisition. Even if not applying the tradition way, let’s say, emailing someone in your network about an opportunity- you will still need a great resume.

    So first thing first, work on your resume.

    Today in the United States, 98% of organizations use applicant tracking systems (ATS) to extract information from an applicant’s resume to build a digital applicant profile that can be searched, filtered, and/or ranked.[1] So, a resume that is ATS friendly is part one for landing and acing a job interview.

    To do this, a resume must have certain formatting and keywords to get the resume through the scan and into the hands of a recruiter. Without a resume that works with and for today’s technology and requirements, an interview can be difficult to land.

    Here’s a great DIY Resume Guide (Do it Yourself Resume Guide) to help you craft an ATS and Recruiter friendly resume:[2]

    There used to be a time where a job application was enough, today, an ATS friendly resume leads all methods in landing a job interview.

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    Now, let’s talk about acing that interview.

    A job interview is part 2 of the job application process. An interview is where applicants that have met the minimum requirements are selected to discuss the job opportunity with the employer or hiring manager.

    Interviews are generally conducted via telephone, in person, and or applications/technology such as Skype. When the interview is landed, these 10 tips will help you ace the job interview:

    1. Going for a Job Opportunity That Speaks to Your Passion

    Having a passion for the job/ industry is extremely important. Doing something that aligns with inner passion is important for quality of life.

    People that have passion for the job that they are interviewing for generally have better interview experiences. When we talk about what we love, it is seen in our faces, our body language, and heard in our tone. Here’re 10 Reasons Why Following Your Passion Is More Important Than Money.

    In short, consideration of talents, discovering the things that make you happy and sad, and what you love losing yourself in.

    2. Study the Job Description: Essential Job Functions and Qualification Requirements

    Doing this will allow you the opportunity to develop examples of past and present experience that relate to the essential job functions and required qualifications.

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    Examples of experience is always a plus for interviewers, painting a full picture goes a long way. Even when not asked for an example, it is always a plus to tie answers to interview questions to examples from your experience.

    If there is a portfolio (work samples: images, writing samples, published work, videos, awards, etc.) of work- that’s even better!

    3. Research the Company and the Interviewer(s)

    Being an employee means entering into a relationship with an employer. In many areas of life, research is done prior to committing; researching a company prior to an interview is no different.

    It is important to determine if the company is a good fit and therefore makes it easier to answer “why do you want to work here?” It helps better verbalize how past experience, skills, and values align with the company’s mission, and it shows the interviewer that you are interested in more than just a job.

    4. Think Positive and Tap into Confidence

    Positivity exudes confidence and both are necessary, so the employers knows that trust can be given.

    Thoughts lead to action, therefore, operating from a positive perspective will reveal confidence. The goal of the interview is to land the job offer; employers need to believe that you believe in yourself so that they can believe you. Here are a few tips for positive thinking.

    5. Have Copies of the Resume Used to Apply for the Job

    It’s always good to be ready for extra interviewers in the room; many interviews today are panel interviews/ multi-person interviews.

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    Though a resume was likely submitted with the application, it is always a good idea to come with extra copies in anticipation of the potential need. If there was no resume submission, it is crucial that you provide a copy during the interview; doing this shows the employer preparedness and resolution to challenges.

    6. Plan for Behavior Based Interview Questions

    Most companies use pre-selected questions, often times having a list of behavior-based questions. Usually these questions start with: “provide an example of”, “tell me about a time when”, and/or “describe a time/situation when”.

    Having examples of problems solved and strategies used, initiatives led, contributions to teams and departments, will help ace a job interview. Painting a picture to help employers see skills, qualifications, and experience is extremely important during a job interview.

    7. Make a List of Selling Points

    It’s important to be proactive about the selling points that you want to make in an interview. This is where a portfolio works great! It is a great idea to make a list of selling points that reaffirms and demonstrates skills, qualifications, and experience.

    Consider: awards, programs/ processes launched that led to cost savings and/or profitability, training/education, etc.

    8. Showcase a Mixture of Personality and Professionalism

    Companies like to make sure that interviewees are a good match for the company culture. Having a good balance of personality and professionalism during a job interview is key.

    Personality can be shown when discussing hobbies, community service or extracurricular activities in answers to behavior-based questions, when describing your passion, and when discussing selling points.

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    9. Have Your Questions Ready- Interviewing Isn’t One-Sided

    Interviews are two-sided, like all relationships (an employee and employer agreement is a type of relationship). Before entering in many relationships, we all have a set of questions that we need answers to, prior to making the decision to commit.

    Beyond doing this for self (because asking questions helps reduce doubt and uncertainty), it also shows the employer that there is interest in the company and its future and, shows that you are informed.

    Here are a few considerations: “Can you tell me about the team I’ll be working with?”, “Why is this position open?”, and “What qualifications/ skills are important to succeed in this role?” You can also take a look at this guide for more idea: 7 Questions to Ask in a Job Interview That Will Impress the Interviewer

    10. Follow-up with a Thank You Note

    Interviewers love gratitude. Sending a “thank you for taking the time to discuss the job opening with me”, is very important to acing an interview.

    Interviewers discuss one job opening with many applicants. A thank you note can serve as gratitude and the final chance to showcase selling points. This is also the opportunity to address any concerns that the interviewer may have had in the interview.

    Summing It up

    Consider a job interview a house. the foundation for acing a job interview is passion. The frame is a resume that lands the interview. The plumbing and electrical are showing up with confidence, providing a list of selling points, having examples of your experience and qualifications, and engaging the interviewer. The roof is showing gratitude with a thank you note.

    More Tips About Job Interviews

    Featured photo credit: Nik MacMillan via unsplash.com

    Reference

    [1] Jobscan: What is an Applicant Tracking System?
    [2] Veronica Castillo: New Job- DIY Resume

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