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7 Signs You Are In An Enviable Working Environment

7 Signs You Are In An Enviable Working Environment

If you wake up dreading the thought of going in to work, it is probably safe to assume that you don’t enjoy the work you do or the environment in which you have to do it. Either scenario can be soul draining. However, since only you can decide what career you are passionate about, we will focus on how to find the best work environment to flourish in.

Your work will take up a good percentage of your life, so it is extremely important that you surround yourself with the right people, positive energy or mindset. These 7 signs will tell if you are working in an enviable environment or not.

1. Circular Leadership is encouraged.

In the past and even true for most companies today, success is too often determined by how fast you are able to move up the corporate ladder of labels and titles.

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However, if you find yourself in a company where all employees lead by their inspirations (what they do), not by hierarchies and titles, (who they are) then chances are, you are working in an enviable environment.

In this new age of ideas and technology, most forward thinking companies today have found value in promoting a culture of circular leadership. It is a truly inclusive culture, one that doesn’t limit our actions, talents and passions at work to the definitions and limits of our job titles.

2. You would almost work for free.

Most organizations falsely believe that their employees are driven solely by money. Yet many professionals would take a pay cut for a job that inspires and motivates them. When you find yourself in an organization you love so much that you would almost work for free, you are in an enviable work environment.

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3. Good Pay.

On the flip side, even if you love what you do and where you do it, you must still earn enough to take care and provide for your family. Good paying work is getting harder to find these days, even as some companies are recording massive profits. Any company that holds the financial welfare of its associates in high regard will most likely have an enviable work environment.

4. There is no micro managing

No one likes being told what to do. A nagging spouse is bad enough; but having a nagging boss at work can be even more frustrating. Micro managing implies a lack of trust in your associates, and where there is no trust, there can be no relationship. Companies with great work environments thrive and flourish by trusting their employees to exercise their natural ability to lead.

5. Communication is strong

Like trust, communication is another key ingredient when looking for an enviable work environment. Communication is important in any relationship and this means knowing when to offer praise, coach, discipline or even delegate work. When looking for a good place to work, a clue missed too often by new employees is how well the current associates interact and talk to one another.

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6. It is a label/Judgment free zone

We all have filters that not only affect the way we think, but also the way we treat other people. In an enviable work environment, all people are truly welcomed, loved, encouraged and accepted regardless of race, gender, color, religion, political affiliation, age or sexual orientation.

7. Your values match.

Looking for an enviable company to work for is all about comparing values. If you believe in Sunday worship or being home every night to tuck your kinds in, yet your company requires you to work weekends and nights; chances are you will not like your work environment.

The workplace should be fun and energetic. These seven signs will most likely be the envy of those who don’t find these scenarios in their workplace. However, with so much of our time spent at work or commuting to work, our life’s happiness can almost be determined by finding the right working environment. If you are currently not in your ideal situation, then you should either change the one you are in or keep looking.

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Featured photo credit: http://www.nbc.com/the-office via nbc.com

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Last Updated on July 16, 2020

How to Decline a Job Offer Gracefully (With Email Examples)

How to Decline a Job Offer Gracefully (With Email Examples)

Generally, if you’re in a position to decline a job offer, it’s a high-quality problem. Maybe you were offered a better position at a different company, or perhaps you were offered the same position at a different organization but for better pay (or perks). Or maybe, after sitting down and discussing the offer with your family, you decided that the travel requirements were too intense. Perhaps the company where you currently work agreed to match the new offer, and once you examined the pros and cons, you realized it made more sense to stay.

Whatever the reason[1], your charge now is knowing how to decline a job offer gracefully. As a courtesy to the company who extended you the job offer, you want to decline quickly, giving the hiring manager a chance to make the offer to the candidate who was the runner-up for the job. You also want to express your appreciation. And, given today’s rocky economy, it makes sense to politely decline the job offer in a way that will hopefully keep the door open for you should your circumstances change.

If you’re not sure how to decline a job offer, check out the following tips to get through it.

3 Ways to Decline a Job Offer Gracefully (With Examples)

1. Show Gratitude

The hiring manager likely spent several hours on your job application—between reading your cover letter, reviewing your resume, and interviewing you either in person or via a videoconferencing platform. Recruitment is a long and sometimes tedious process for any employer. There is always competition for every open job, and the hiring manager may have pushed your candidacy over others in the queue.

For these reasons, your note needs to express thoughtfulness and genuine appreciation. That said, it needn’t be lengthy.

The following example is concise and expresses gratitude in several ways, providing a good example for how you can decline a job offer gracefully:

Subject Line: Job Offer – [Your Name]

Dear Mr./Ms. ________[Hiring manager’s last name],

Thank you for offering me the position of _______ [job title] with _________ [company name]. I greatly appreciate the vote of confidence that comes with your offer. However, after carefully considering the opportunities for career advancement, I have decided to stay where I am.

I sincerely thank you for the time and consideration you devoted to my application, interview, and follow-up. I appreciate your graciousness and consummate professionalism throughout.

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I wish you success in all the company’s undertakings that you outlined. Thank you again for extending the opportunity to work with you.

Sincerely,

[Your name]

2. Give a Reason, but Don’t Elaborate

If you had several interviews at the company, then saying why you are turning down the offer shows respect and professional courtesy. It’s fine to say that you took a different job offer, decided to stay at your company, or even felt that the salary was not sufficient. The trick is to say it succinctly.

The following example does just that:

Subject Line: Job Offer – [Your Name]

Dear Mr./Ms. _______ [Hiring manager’s name],

I greatly appreciate your offer of the position of _______ [job title]. I was very impressed with you and the staff members who interviewed me, as well as the direction of the company. I regret, however, that I must decline your offer due to the salary offered.

I sincerely appreciate the opportunity to have met you and your team and to learn about your company. Again, I am grateful for the positive interviewing experience with your company and for the job offer.

I wish great success with your plans to move forward.

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Best regards,

[Your name]

3. Offer to Stay in Touch

This technique isn’t for everyone, but if you felt a strong connection with the person who interviewed you, or if you could see yourself working at the company in a few years, it might make sense to offer to keep in touch.

Remember that hiring managers switch companies, too, and it’s always a good idea to have a hiring manager think well of you!

The following example includes an offer to stay in touch in a gentle way:

Subject Line: Job Offer – [Your Name]

Dear Mr./Ms. ________[Hiring manager’s name],

I am writing to personally thank you for offering me the position of ________ [job title] at _______[company name]. I enjoyed meeting you and having a chance to meet the other members of the team. It was an extremely difficult decision for me, but I have accepted a position at another company.

I genuinely appreciate the time you devoted to interviewing me and to sharing your insights on the direction of the company. I hope we might stay in touch as I value your visionary ideas about our industry’s future.

Again, thank you for your time and consideration, and I wish you all the best for your continued success.

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Respectfully,

[Your name]

Should You Hold out for Your Dream Job?

If you interviewed with two companies, and your dream company is dragging out its decision while your second choice company has made you an offer, what’s the best direction to take? As long as the job offer from your second choice company is in keeping with your goals for upward mobility, added responsibility, and increased salary, you are better off accepting the extended offer for two reasons.

First, the reason the dream company is prolonging the process may be because it has made an offer to another and is negotiating with another candidate. Second, if you accept another offer and withdraw your candidacy from the dream company, the hiring manager will note your desirability to another (possibly competing) employer and may try to recruit you in the future.

It is the epitome of poor form to decline a job after accepting it, even if your dream company finally comes through with an offer. This puts the company that made the original offer in a huge bind, particularly if it has already sent rejections to its other candidates and is taking steps for on-boarding you. This could make you a pariah at the company, and in any industry, news travels fast and far.

The Best Medium for Declining a Job Offer

Should you send your response via email? Or pick up the telephone and call the hiring manager? The most professional response is to use the same method they used to extend you the offer. If they offered you the job via email, then feel free to email your reply. If they called you or left a voicemail message, then picking up the telephone is the preferred method. Do your best to call during business hours.

To be as poised as possible, you may want to write out your rejection and practice saying it a few times. Time it to make sure it does not exceed 30 seconds. (Even if you leave a voicemail, you may need to also write them an email for their records.)

If the hiring manager wants to chat further, don’t give the impression that you want to quickly end the call. Give the conversation your full attention to let the employer know that you value the relationship that you have built. It’s important not to burn bridges if you should decide to apply at the company again in the future—or at another company where the manager happens to transfer to. Remain discreet, but converse with decorum if the other party wants to prolong the conversation.

Dotting I’s and Crossing T’s

Always include your contact information, including your phone number, although the company already has it. Double check your communication for typos. If you know a candidate that you believe would be a perfect fit for the job, you may want to mention it. (First make sure he or she really wants the job, though. Reach out to them before suggesting their name.)

Be sure to send your email within normal business hours. Remember that you are not trying to avoid the hiring manager—you’re opening up a line of communication with her or him that you may well use again down the road.

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When They Go Low, You Go High

Granted, not every potential employer has a winning personality. You may have decided well before the offer was extended that this was not a person with whom you wished to work. Or, the company culture[2] may have felt like it would not be a good fit, and you’ve since corroborated the incompatible impression with people in your network.

Whatever gut feelings signaled to you that you needed to turn down an offer, don’t include or even allude to them in your rejection letter[3]. Stating that the position is not the right fit for you and your career is all that you need to disclose.

This final example is for when you prefer not to disclose the reason for your rejection, and you’re looking for a kind, concise way of turning down the job:

Subject Line: Job Offer – [Your Name]

Dear Mr./Ms. ________[Hiring manager’s name],

I genuinely appreciate your taking the time to interview me and the consideration you gave me as a job candidate. I have, however, decided to decline your offer of the ______ [job title], as I have come to realize that the position is not the right fit for me at this time.

I wish you well in your search for the best-suited candidate.

Cordially,

[Your name]

Final Thoughts

Learning how to decline a job offer politely and professionally will keep you in good graces with the prospective employer and help the person better accept your rejection. Let the person know that your change of heart in pursuing a new job isn’t personal, and that you found the experience rewarding.

When you show gratitude and let the hiring manager know that the time and effort invested in you is appreciated, you continue to strengthen your professional standing.

More on How to Decline a Job Offer

Featured photo credit: Christina @ wocintechchat.com via unsplash.com

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