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3 Questions to Ask Before You Quit Your Job

3 Questions to Ask Before You Quit Your Job

Just over a year ago, I quit my job to try my hand at being an entrepreneur—before I knew what that really meant. What I wanted to do was create something that matters, do work that is meaningful in some way.

This isn’t one of those success stories about quitting the corporate world to instant happiness and wealth. Far from it.

My path was up and down, up and down.

  • I got great clients, and then hit roadblocks when I lacked clear communication.
  • I hired a staff, and then downsized 100%.
  • I hated dealing with finances but then took on all accounting tasks myself.
  • I loathed standing in long lines at government offices but then learned how to do all of that online.

Hindsight is 20/20, and there are some things I just wish I had known before quitting my job. 

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Here are the three questions I wish I had asked myself before quitting my job, if only to make the transition smoother:

1. Is the market ready for my idea?

The first fear I faced when contemplating a job move was this:
What if I don’t make any money?

Leaving a job’s security is scary, but very worthwhile if done right. If you truly want to go out on your own, consider the market carefully and consistently. Chances are you have great skills you can offer clients, but you may also want to develop some kind of product offering (like an eBook), too.

Here are some questions to ask yourself about whether or not the market is ready for you:

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  • Is there a need for my service or product?
  • How much are my competitors charging for similar offerings?
  • Can I do what I want to (write eBooks or become a painter) while maintaining the lifestyle I dream of?
  • Who are my potential customers: big businesses, small businesses, individuals, athletes, moms? (The more specific you get, the better your results will be.)

Being clear on how well your ideas and plan fit into the market will help you avoid so many headaches in the future.

2. Is my idea ready for the market?

Brainstorming a new project or idea can be so much fun. It’s the creative process that feels freeing and light—it’s a direct manifestation of the purpose that drives us.

To make any idea work, however, there are some things that go past brainstorming. For example:

  • How will you price your product to achieve your goals?
  • How will you reach your potential customers?
  • Will you make money off your idea forever or just one-off sales?
  • If your customers have questions, how will you handle servicing them?
  • How will you manage expectations when you gain a new customer or project?

These are just a few issues I struggled with starting out. There are many more questions to answer in preparing your idea for the market.

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The only real way is to read, read, read and study, study, study what is out there.

3. Who can help launch my new project?

This is probably the question I missed the most in the beginning of my quest to living an awesome life out on my own. I can’t even imagine all the mistakes I could have skipped and all the connections I could have made if I had given this question the thought it deserves.
A community of peers gives an idea superpowers, launching it to success.

Once I discovered this amazing superpower, it became the most used tool in my toolset.

When I have an idea or a doubt in my mind, I turn to my small tribe of peers. I probably call on them way too much! Their input, though, is invaluable. Without their final touches, I could never have reached sustainability, freedom, and happiness.

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To enlist the help of awesome people, I reach out online just as much as in person. I’ve made great friends through Twitter, but my favorite way of connecting and collaborating with people is through events like conferences. By combining the physical and digital world, I find relationships truly thrive.

What This Means For You

If you are desiring a change in career or a new way to do meaningful work, I applaud your courage—but I also urge you to plan for the ups and downs to come. 

Like everything in life, there is a learning curve. I hope these three questions keep your learning curve from becoming too steep.

If you have any questions or comments, please share them below.

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5 Powerful Ideas on How to Be Productive at Work

5 Powerful Ideas on How to Be Productive at Work

Not being able to stay productive at work is a problem that everyone runs into at some point; no matter how much you like your job, there are certain factors that prevent you from staying at maximum proficiency throughout the whole day.

A lack of productive focus at work can lead to extra stress on yourself, missed deadlines, passed opportunities, raise denial, demotion and even termination.

So, if you are someone who has trouble with your productivity, here are five effective tips on how to be productive at work:

1. Take breaks

First and foremost, it’s important for you to take regular breaks. Trying to work throughout the whole day will tire your brain, which will then cause you to doze off and think about something else.

If you keep working your brain, it will fill up and get jumbled with information—sort of like a computer hard drive. Taking a break would be like resetting your computer so that it can start afresh, or de-fragmenting the data so that all the information is in order.

This is a great thing because it allows you to solve problems you were unable to solve previously, by seeing it differently; if you are able to organize your thoughts properly, you will be able to take in new information more easily.

There have even been studies about methods of saving time and staying proficient, and taking breaks is one of the leading factors.

According to Christine Hohlbaum, the author of The Power of Slow: 101 Ways to Save Time in Our 24/7 World, eating lunch away from your work area every day will greatly increase your productivity. Eating in your work area will give you the illusion that you are working, but whether you like it or not, your brain will begin to wander and think of something else and then you will be working tirelessly with no progress.

It’s important to take breaks before and during work too: if you come to work in a rush because you woke up late, your mind will not be mentally prepared for the day ahead, and you will spend the first 10 to 15 minutes trying to get organized and composed before you can actually start working.

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Instead, you should try to wake up 20 minutes earlier than the time it would take you to “just get” to work. Take that time to stare off into space and not worry about anything.

If you do this, your brain will be empty and ready for all the challenges it has coming for the next few hours.

If your employer only allows a set amount of breaks during the workday, that doesn’t mean you can’t just get up and walk around for a quick break every now and then.

Even if it’s only 5 minutes, it will refresh your brain and you will gain renewed energy to do your job.

Learn more about The Importance of Scheduling Downtime.

2. Pace yourself and balance your workload

One problem that most people run into is that they underestimate the amount of work they have to do, and end up doing 50% of the work in the last 20% of the time they have to do it. This is due to an issue of balancing one’s workload.

When you receive a project, or are doing a job you normally do, take some time to really plan out your work schedule.

Consider how much time it took you to do this last time; determine how you can break the project into smaller parts and which can only be accomplished on certain days, and whether anything might come up that could interfere with your plan.

All of these questions are important for starting on a project, and when answered, they will help you stay productive throughout each day.

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For example, if you needed to design a project to map out the amount of aid offered in various regions after Hurricane Sandy, you can break it up as follows:

You will need to know what organizations are offering help to begin with, how much aid those organizations gave or plan to give, which regions were hit by Sandy, and which regions suffered the greatest losses.

You start this project on a Thursday and know you have until Tuesday to gather this information.

In order to stay productive, you need to plan out your work week—now you know you can find out which organizations are involved in helping the Hurricane Sandy Victims any day since that information is online, but gathering information on the organizations may require you to call them.

Since phone calls can only be done during week days, you have to plan on gathering all of that information before the weekend comes.

That is just one example of a situation in which pre-planning your project will help you stay productive; had you researched the affected regions first, you would not have received the info on the organizations until the weekend, and may have missed your chance to call them.

That, in turn, would have wasted time you could have spent working on this project to finish it.

Knowing what you need to do, when you can do it, and how long it will take you, is important in balancing your workload and being more productive and efficient.

3. Put your work first

This is an issue that usually occurs with young people who are new to the workforce: they’re often tempted with offers to go out at midday, and then come back lost in thought and unfocused on their work-related tasks.

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While it is important to take breaks, your breaks should consist of you clearing your mind, not loading it up with other less important information—like sports.

However, that is not the only situation where you need to worry about putting your work first before all else.

In a work environment, the senior employees will oftentimes push some of their menial tasks onto the newer employees. If you fall into that category, you need to know that their work is not your work, so if you have tasks that need to be done, you need to do it first.

If you are a new employee, you must learn to say no to other people even when it means you may not be in their good graces anymore. You can help others out once your work is done, but you are paid to do your own work, not anyone else’s.

4. Don’t open your browser unless you need them

In this day and age, everyone is constantly monitoring their social network. This is a major pain point for companies, which is why many don’t allow employees to access their social networks on company workstations.

When you are at work, disconnect the internet from your phone and keep your browsers closed so you’re not tempted to log onto your social media accounts or browse any sites that are not work-related.

If you keep your browsers closed and phone tucked away, only to be used in an emergency, you will find yourself being a more productive employee right away. 

5. Try to be happy and optimistic

If you always have a negative outlook on life, you will be more distracted and less motivated to get work done, so it’s important for you to start your day off right.

This can be done by having a good breakfast or by taking time in the morning to watch one of your favorite TV shows before work.

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If you are happy, you will find yourself able to work much more productively as your mind won’t wander into worrying about something else.

Also, if you stay optimistic and keep telling yourself that you can do whatever you set your mind to, the tasks will seem much less daunting and will go by much more quickly.

Take a look at more effective ways to stay positive at work:

15 Ways To Stay Positive At Work

Happiness and optimism are the keys to being a productive and happy employee.

All in all, heed the five tips above and you will find yourself being one of the most productive people at your company.

While you do not need to master them all, each and every one of them will help you become a better and more efficient employee.

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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