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18 Things a 21st Century Teacher SHOULD Do and HOW To Do Them!

18 Things a 21st Century Teacher SHOULD Do and HOW To Do Them!

DO you know what an IFTTT recipe is? What about how to App Smash something? The technology available at our fingertips is mind blowing, but all too often, we aren’t even close to using it to its capacity. As a teacher, I have seen my fellow colleagues beat their heads against a wall (metaphorically speaking) as they attempt to hold back the tide of technology as students try to help it wash into the classroom. What are we so afraid of? Surely it’s well and truly time to get ahead of the game and teach our students that their phones and tablets can be used for more than game playing and social media.

We are in the 21st century and we need to recognise that these devices can actually make our lives easier! We already know that students want to be using their devices, they also like the curiosity challenge, so we should be using this to our advantage. Before you know it, the kids will be on-task and with less behaviour management issues to deal with when we can make activities interactive & interesting.

For those who are struggling to catch up to an increasingly digital world, let me help solve the awkwardness for you. Here is a list of ideas that I gathered from HookED on Innovation, that help guide you from “what the heck does that mean” to “ah, so that’s how I can use this in my classroom.”

1. Post a question of the week on your class blog.

If you don’t already have a class blog, you should seriously consider it. Here’s a link which guides you through 15 blog sites you could use and explains the pros and cons of each. If you’re not sure what happens on blogs, here’s a link to some forward-thinking 21st century teachers with successful classroom blogs so you can get some ideas for what to include in your blog. This strategy is a great way to have your students own what happens in your classroom and hone their literacy skills! Happy blogging!

2. Participate in a Twitter chat.

Whether you are a tweet-a-holic or are still trying to understand what a #hashtag means, this link explains 50 ways you can use Twitter in the classroom. If you don’t even know how to get to Twitter, here is a helpful video that will guide you through where to find it and how to get started.

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3. Make a parody of a hit song.

A personal favourite of mine is Autorap, an iPhone app that lets you speak into the phone and automatically converts it into rap song and puts it to music! One of my year eight students showed me this app and it certainly changed how we do revision now. Sometimes the words are difficult to hear, so I like to make a quick movie to the soundtrack. Here is a link to an example, in which I used My Talking Pet, Windows Movie Maker and Autorap #AppSmash.

4. Create an infographic as a review.

Visual cues help us store and access information which increases the chances that your students will remember what you’ve taught them. If you’re not the creative type, you can use a free template, or make your own using PowerPoint. Infographics are a must for the 21st century teacher.

infographic

    5. Go paperless.

    In Australia, we use 2.4 million tonnes of paper each year. How much paper does your organisation use? Here are 15 tips for going paperless in your school.

    6. Create your own class #hashtag.

    This 21st century teacher strategy allows Twitter to categorise your tweets so they are all grouped together and easier to find. Here’s a quick link to get you started.

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    7. Integrate selfies into your curriculum.

    Show me a student who doesn’t like a good ol’ selfie and you’ve just found yourself an alien (or perhaps an undercover police officer). Using this strategy personalizes the learning and makes it more memorable. I utilised this strategy when my year 12 Science in Practice class had an assessment piece making a user guide for the equipment in our Performing Arts Centre. The photos they used needed to be authentic and recognisable as them using the equipment. It worked so well and really made sure they knew how to use the equipment rather than getting a random pic from Google. All you need for this one is a smartphone, iPod with camera capabilities, or if you go old-school…a camera.

    8. Curate a class Pinterest account.

    Using Pinterest with students allows them to collaborate with others to curate information. Critical thinking skills come in play when students locate, analyse, and select quality information for a board answering an essential question for a research project. Check out this guide for uses, project ideas and a rubric for assessment!

    9. App Smash something.

    It’s what the cool kids do! What is it? Content created in one app transferred to and enhanced by a second app and sometimes a third. Preferably the final product is then published to the web–remember, digital presence is the new résumé (CV). Here’s how to smash it up! Note: #2 uses App Smashing technology…look at you go already!

    10. Use Augmented Reality.

    Combine the real world and computer-generated realities for an interactive and mind-blowing lesson. You will surely look like a ninja with this strategy. Warning: your students are quite likely to be engaged…are you ok with that?

    11. Create an IFTTT recipe.

    What the heck is that? IFTTT (abbreviation of “If This Then That” and pronounced like “gift” without the “g”) is a web-based service which allows other services (e.g., Gmail, Google Reader, Instagram, Craigslist) to be programmed by means of simple conditional statements (called “recipes”). This strategy essentially packages everything that you are interested in and allows for some automation which is time saving! Here’s how to use it.

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    12. Perform in a lip dub video.

    Perhaps we’ll see this strategy in the 21st century school camps. It’s touted as a fun and unique way to bring your team together and learn how to work together. In the very least, it does look like fun!

    13. Create an ebook.

    With so many templates out there, making an ebook for your class work is definitely impressive. In Australia, ebooks represent about 10 percent of the market (Slattery, 2013). This means that the market has a long way to grow and teaching students this skill now could help develop a passive income strand before they are even out of high school. Flex your 21st century teacher muscles and use an app, or just make it in PowerPoint or Microsoft Word and save it as a PDF–it’s that easy! Snappy is also a great resource to use, when you click on it, it looks a little boring, but download the program and it’s super easy to use!

    14. Produce a class audio podcast.

    State of the News Media (2011) estimated there were 2,231 education podcasts produced. This is not many when you consider that Apple put the total number of podcasts at around 250,000. This 21st century teacher skill is a great way for students to show depth of understanding as well as to learn digitally relevant skills that could easily have them as the next Steve Jobs, before they even graduate. Here are some ways to get into podcasting.

    Podcast
       Image by Michael McLean

      15. Use a backchannel.

      How many times a day do you tell your students to put their phones away during their lesson? What if there was a way to harness that interest and propensity for conversation and tie it into your lesson? There is and it’s been around for a little while now; it’s called a Backchannel. While this sounds awesome, you need to put some constraints around it or your lesson will be lost forever. I learned this the hard way, in true ‘crash and burn’ style but I can tell you that it certainly is the fastest way to learn. I would definitely use it again with implementing some strategies before starting.

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      16. Create comics.

      Comics are the perfect way to help engage learners in reading and getting them to use their imaginations (something we seem to train out of our kids as they get older). These can be used to show understanding for a concept, practice active problem solving, improve writing skills and even help students understand body language cues. You don’t need to be super computer literate, but this 21st century teaching strategy is so easy to implement.

      21st Century Teacher skills

        Image by www.makebeliefscomix.com

        17. Take a photo of class work.

        Technology is here to stay and the quicker you harness its benefits, the easier your job will be. Use your mobile phone to record the work covered during the lesson and then upload it to your class blackboard/Moodle/internet page. This way if students are away, they can easily catch up on the work covered.

        18. Peer review assignments.

        Have students complete the draft of an assignment and post it to their individual blog. Just because you are a 21st century teacher, that doesn’t mean that everything needs to be done with technology (shock!). This strategy could just as easily be done using a planning template. The idea is that classmates should go into at least three of their classmates’ blogs/template and give hot and cold comments as constructive feedback. Hot comments are when students outline what needs to change and cold comments are specific things that were done well. (e.g. Hot–Make sure your writing is in third person. Cold–Your paragraphs link well.)

        For more ideas, read 21 Things Every 21st Century Teacher Should Do This Year.

        Featured photo credit: Students in class via shutterstock.com

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        18 Things a 21st Century Teacher SHOULD Do and HOW To Do Them!

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        Last Updated on July 13, 2020

        15 Ways to Set Professional Goals (Examples Included)

        15 Ways to Set Professional Goals (Examples Included)

        It’s hard to describe the frustration you feel when your professional goals keep falling flat. You’re floundering and you’re not where you want to be professionally, which bleeds into your personal life and causes you to get upset and sad easily.

        You need a system, a way to set goals that makes them attainable 100 percent of the time. When you establish your system, it takes the guesswork out of goal achievement and makes it a matter of completing specific steps.

        Where would you be right now in your life if you had followed such a system from the beginning of your professional career and stuck with it? Would you be owning and running your own business, would you be working for a company you love, or would you be independently creating great work that keeps you in high demand?

        This is where it gets good. The following tips will cover the most actionable ways to set professional goals (with professional goals examples included). If you follow these tips and do your absolute best each step of the way, you’ll have no choice but to launch into a new, exciting period in your professional life.

        Start with tip number 1 — this tip is essential to any and all of the other tips on this list. Although you’re starting with 1, this is not a linear list. You can take each tip by itself and run with it, or you can implement as many as possible — the choice is yours. That said, the more action you take, the closer you are to making tip 1 a reality.

        Ready to grasp the very essence of what it is to succeed? Keep reading.

        1. Identify What You Love — and Make a Statement

        This is it — the single most important word is not career, it’s love. Your primary, overarching, life-defining career goal must center around what you love.

        You figured out what you love when you were young, and then somewhere along the way you lost it in the noise, the pressure, and the clutter of everyday life.

        Billions of people exist on this Earth, and things aren’t what we wish they could be because we succumb to fear instead of doing what we love.

        How can you take what you love and serve this love with your career?

        • Create a statement, a single sentence that encapsulates your overarching career goal. Make it specific.
        • Write the love-of your-life career goal sentence down and pin it to the wall where you’ll see it every day.
        • Make sure this sentence informs all your other objectives.
        • Make sure your primary career goal is the result of what you love to do.

        Example:

        “Be a successful nonfiction author: Write nonfiction content — books, poems, essays, blog posts — to help people realize the priceless importance of love and the imagination, and get your content published.”

        2. Don’t Just Create SMART Objectives — Be Ultra-SMART

        Now that you have your ultimate career goal nailed to the wall, it’s time to get SMART. That is, use the SMART acronym to create objectives:

        • Specific
        • Measurable
        • Achievable
        • Relevant
        • Timed

        Your SMART objectives are micro-goals that fit all of the above criteria. They are not nebulous, vague, and tough to complete. They are daily objectives you know you can handle, and they’re necessary.

        You have to complete SMART objectives in order to meet other, tougher goals, which ultimately contribute to your main goal.

        So how do you make your SMART objectives ultra-SMART? Push yourself. Don’t settle for the same level of output every day. Don’t hold yourself to low standards. Think about quality and do your absolute best.

        Example:

        SMART: “Today I will write 500 words about the power of love between 10am and 2pm.”

        Ultra-SMART: “Today I will write 500 words about the power of love between 10am and 2pm, and will find 3 accredited, scientific sources to backup my argument.”

        Note that “Ultra-SMART” is not about writing more — more isn’t necessarily better, and if you’re just starting out, may not be achievable; rather, ultra-SMART is about focusing on quality within a reasonable framework.

        3. Identify an Absolutely Essential Stepping Stone and Step to It

        No one realizes their ultimate goal without finding a job that will push them in that direction. Jobs pay, and you need money to survive, but you don’t want a job that has nothing to do with your career goal. Pinpoint a job that is like an apprenticeship for what you ultimately want to do.

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        Example:

        When famous author Neil Gaiman delivered his commencement address[1] — which, by the way, is phenomenal — to University of the Arts in Philadelphia, he said something that makes perfect sense:

        “I wanted to write comics and novels and stories and films, so I became a journalist, because journalists are allowed to ask questions, and to simply go and find out how the world works, and besides, to do those things I needed to write and to write well, and I was being paid to learn how to write economically, crisply, sometimes under adverse conditions, and on time.”

        Note that Gaiman’s goal was to be a creative writer, but he took a position in journalism, which isn’t creative writing; it’s about facts, writing them well, and having discipline. For Gaiman, journalism was a stepping stone towards achieving his overarching goal.

        4. Get Really, Really Good at Crafting Your Resume

        You’re not going to settle, and there are multiple stepping stones towards your final destination. But here’s the clincher:

        Crafting a great resume is about more than landing a job.

        Crafting a great resume is about learning how to think from someone else’s perspective. If you can imagine what someone else wants to see in a great resume, you can view other things from their perspective too, and that’s important in the professional world.

        To do a resume the right way, consider the mistakes you should avoid:[2]

        • Avoid disorganization: Provide your name, work experience and corresponding titles, education, relevant skills.
        • Avoid irrelevant information: Consider the position you’re applying for carefully and focus on information relevant to it.
        • Avoid length: A one page resume with just the right wording is a thing of wonder.
        • Avoid showy fonts and words: Be basic but let your personality shine through.
        • Avoid sloppiness: Check for typos, misspelling, and grammatical mistakes.

        Example: Here’s a great resume example, courtesy of Shayanne Gal from Business Insider:[3]

          5. Ask Yourself the Most In-Depth Questions

          Throughout your educational career, you heard teachers say, “There are no bad questions” or something to that effect.

          It’s true; however, this mantra ignored the fact that some questions are better than others.

          Asking, “How can I do x in a unique and interesting way?” is better than asking “How can I do x?”

          You can set professional goals that you might accomplish, or you can set professional goals you’re highly likely to accomplish because you went in-depth with your questions. This goes very well with SMART goals. Specificity and detail are the hallmarks of achievable goals.

          Example:

          Say, for instance, you’re at the point where you feel you can start your own business from home. The Hartford offers pertinent questions you should ask before doing so:[4]

          • Will your house accommodate your business?
          • Can you find work-life balance?
          • When you interact with customers, how will you showcase a professional image?
          • Are there city zoning ordinances you need to consider?
          • Do you have the insurance and tax liabilities covered?

          6. Use a Digital Assistant to be Insanely Efficient

          Executives and bosses have personal assistants to help them with scheduling, organization, and other time-consuming tasks.

          You may not be at the point in your career where you can afford to hire somebody, which is why it helps to have a productivity assistant to help you be more efficient.

          Use an app to keep track of mundane scheduling and other minute details so you can free up your mind for creativity.

          Example:

          See this list of task management apps . Out of all of them, Any.do has one of the best interfaces, and it will give you the reminders you need to stay on task.

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            7. Create a Vivid Mental Picture

            Discouragement can and will happen — it’s a part of life, whether professional or personal. Don’t wait until you get discouraged to visualize yourself doing well.

            Practice your mental picture of success even at the times when everything is going so well it’s unbelievable, but you’re not quite at the end-point yet.

            When things aren’t going well, it’ll be the much easier to remain in a positive mind-state because you practiced being there.

            Example:

            Social scientist Frank Niles provides a perfect example of goal visualization:[5]

            “Former NBA great Jerry West is a great example of how this works. Known for hitting shots at the buzzer, he acquired the nickname ‘Mr. Clutch.’ When asked what accounted for his ability to make the big shots, West explained that he had rehearsed making those same shots countless times in his mind.”

            Note that West visualized sinking the exact shots; again, specificity matters.

            8. Express Your Professional Goals Positively

            This goes directly with the visualization process. Goals can seem like chores, which is why it’s important to use positive, proactive wording when you’re vocalizing or writing things down.

            Through positive expression, you’re training your brain to take a certain path whenever you think about your professional goals. This translates into forward, positive momentum whenever you take action.

            You’re more likely to take action if you associate that action with positive thoughts and feelings.

            Example:

            Instead of, “It isn’t that hard to type 500 words in 4 hours,” say, “I like taking advantage of the time I set aside to zone in and really have fun with what I’m doing.”

            Note that the specific goal — 500 words in 4 hours — is implied because you already know it.

            The point of this statement is to associate a feeling of enjoyment with commitment and focus.

            9. Build Your Network with Passion and Purpose

            A professional network will help you hit those stepping stones necessary to achieving your ultimate goal. But you don’t want to network with just anyone.

            Build a network with other people who share your passion, build it based around your specialty, but also look for people from outside your usual sphere who can help you gain a different perspective.

            Demonstrate your passion by helping other people, and listen more than you talk.

            Example:

            Find a mentor — it’s perhaps the most critical networking move you can make. MileIQ provides some examples of where to start:[6]

            • The SCORE Business Learning Center
            • Small Business Development Centers
            • Women’s Business Centers
            • Veteran’s Business Outreach Centers
            • Minority Business Development Agency
            • A trade association through your SBA district office

            10. Benchmark a Competitor Like a Boss

            If you’re freelancing or running your own business, this one is particularly applicable to you.

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            Is there an exemplary freelancer or small business owner with whom you’re impressed? Analyze what this person has done to get where they are, find a metric to serve as a benchmark of their success, and aim to do better.

            Example:

            Benchmark social metrics — say, for example, you’re writing an article on cryptocurrency for a finance website. Buzzsumo[7] provides a tool you can use to benchmark the number of social shares a competitor has earned for this topic:

              11. Master Time Management

              Here’s the thing about professional goals:

              You must master time management to accomplish them. Understand how much time to set aside for each objective; and when you’re working on objectives, use your time not just efficiently, but mindfully.

              That means immersing yourself in the activities that are essential to completing objectives. Focus on what works best to achieve your desired outcome.

              Example:

              Life and business strategist Tony Robbins recommends “chunking your goals,” otherwise known as compartmentalization:

              • Write down tasks you need to get done during the week.
              • Group different tasks together based on their categories, e.g. “Consult SCORE about a mentor” and “talk to Ted about job opportunities” would be categorized under “Networking.”
              • Set aside time for each category.
              • Work on the tasks for a single category during a specific chunk of time.

              12. Identify Your Strengths and Weaknesses — and Get Strategic

              As you move toward accomplishing your primary career goal, you’ll note that different objectives fit into different categories, and you’re better at some categories than you are others.

              Once you know what you’re good at, focus on it. Spend as much time as you can concentrating on your strong-points.

              When it comes to your weaknesses, ask for help.

              Forbes contributor Elana Lynn Gross reveals that asking for help the right way can advance your career. “Ask targeted questions that will allow you to set your strategy,” Gross says.[8]

              Within any category, work on what you’re good at first, and then ask your network for help with blind spots.

              Example:

              Christine Wallace, VP of Branding and Marketing at Startup Institute, told Fast Company how she ended up dropping her first venture:[9]

              “I took a train from the Valley up to San Francisco and met with two mentors, who agreed that it was the end of the road for Quincy [Apparel]. After it was all over I spent three weeks straight in bed. Then after 21 days of sleeping, crying, I put on my big girl pants and rejoined the world.”

              In Wallace’s case, she needed to ask her mentors for help to understand when to move on.

              Don’t be afraid to ask for advice when something isn’t working.

              13. Take Advantage of Awesome Resources at Your Disposal

              When it comes to setting professional goals, tunnel-vision and short-sightedness are big problems for many of us.

              We think there’s only one way to complete an objective. The truth is there are multiple ways to approach any problem.

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              This implies taking a moment to step back, view your objective from a distance, and survey your options. Think differently, use your imagination, and do a thorough search — online and off — for resources.

              Example:

              Get a library card, scour the shelves, AND crowdsource ideas from social media — you may find something unexpected.

              14. Be a Brand That Stands Out

              Believe it or not, your brand is a very important part of your overall career goal. There are two aspects here:

              • How you appear via any published format
              • How you appear in person

              It’s more important to have a quality brand than it is to be prolific, so don’t publish anything — on social media or elsewhere — that you will regret.

              You will make mistakes in your endeavors, and in fact it’s important to take risks and make mistakes.

              There are good mistakes. Good mistakes are the screw-ups that show you’re striving toward your goal. Anytime you set an objective, think about how it aligns with brand and overall goal. In other words, know when to say “no” to projects that don’t compliment your brand and overall mission.

              Example:

              View yourself as a thought leader, be one, and make content that showcases your thought leadership:[10]

              • Videos: Post on YouTube, your website, and social media
              • Podcasts: Learn how to start podcasting.[11]
              • Workshops or meetups: Look for a community space and invite others to join you in discussion.
              • Blog posts and newspaper op-eds: Share your knowledge and opinions.

              15. Steal Ideas from Your Competitors

              This is the one truth that’s hard to stomach. Great ideas come to those who steal. You may not be sure of your next step, your next objective, and time is precious.

              Observe what other great professionals are doing, capture the core of their objectives, make them your own, and craft them into something new.

              Example:

              Steve Jobs, the visionary behind Apple, fully endorsed the Picasso quote, “Good artists copy, great artists steal.”[12]

              In 1989, Xerox sued Apple for stealing ideas and incorporating them in the Macintosh and Lisa computers, but lost the lawsuit. That’s because Apple made something new.

              Here’s a simple way to go about this. Say you’re writing about freelancing, and the Freelancers Union blog is one of your top competitors. Pop the URL into Buzzsumo. You’ll see that the top articles are about taxes:

                In that case, you can write a “Definitive Guide to Taxes for Freelancers” or “Definitive Guide to Tax Breaks for Freelancers.”

                It’s About Passion and Practicality Combined

                Your primary career goal must be about what you love to do. Otherwise, why would you want to do it?

                To reach your goal, you must make small, practical steps. Don’t expect everything to go perfectly along the way, and don’t eschew hard work that isn’t exactly exciting.

                Too often, we get caught up in the excitement of the dream, and when the step-by-step isn’t nearly as exciting, we quit.

                Learn how to do the boring, rote tasks with joy because you’re doing them to achieve greatness.

                Always remember why you set out on a mission to begin with, and let your brain follow your heart.

                More Tips for Setting Professional Goals

                Featured photo credit: rawpixel via unsplash.com

                Reference

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