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11 Signs You Actually Love Your Work

11 Signs You Actually Love Your Work

Did you know that the majority of U.S. employees are satisfied with their jobs? According to a Society for Human Resource Management survey, 81% of U.S. employees reported overall satisfaction with their current jobs. Satisfaction is nice but hardly exciting. Let’s look at the signs love work!

1. You don’t dread the work week; You look forward to Monday morning.

When you love your work, you look forward to Monday morning. Even the most successful people have difficult weeks but if you love your work, those weeks are the exception rather than the rule.

2. You don’t arrive late, but you do arrive early.

Arriving on time (or early!) shows your interest in your work. While everyone is late from time to time due to traffic or personal challenges, happy professionals are known for their punctual habits.

After all, how often are you late for something you’re looking forward to? If you work from home, getting an early start is an even greater sign that you enjoy your work.

3. You don’t complain about work; You speak about your work with enthusiasm.

Many happy professionals take pride in sharing their passion for their work with others. For example, you may be an active contributor to a LinkedIn Group dedicated to your profession.

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Or you may simply enjoying answering the question “What do you do for a living?” If you are delighted,

4. You focus on winning instead of just getting by.

Winning is a quality that sets happy professionals apart from their unhappy peers who aim to “get through” each day. Adopting a winning attitude at work gives you momentum to work on challenging goals in the rest of your life.

– Learn how to Keep winning by reading 7 Things Your Boss Expects You Know About Winning At Work.

5. You’re not a clock watcher, but you do lose track of time.

When you are deeply involved in enjoyable work, you lose track of time. Minutes and hours fly by like seconds. It’s a wonderful feeling!

Flow, a concept discovered by researcher Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, is a state of very deep focus on a task. It helps you break through challenging problems and represents a new level of productivity.

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– Tip: Getting into flow doesn’t have to be rocket science – Achieve Flow by Hacking Your Tasks.

6. You ask for more responsibility instead of worrying about work load.

When you love your workplace and profession, you are hungry for more work. Over time, many people become more productive at their work tasks. Instead of heading home at 4 pm, you ask for more work to do to remain productive.

7. You don’t complain about your company; Instead, you laugh with your colleagues.

The people you work with make a big difference on how much joy you feel at your workplace. When you laugh with people at the office, it’s much easier to relax and have an effectively perspective on problems.

In contrast, unhappy workers tend to work with people with a negative attitude.

Nobody denies that problems exist at work but there’s little to be gained by obsessing over problems.

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8. You are proud of your work accomplishments instead of complaining about shortcomings.

Preparing for your annual review is a joy when you love your work. Why? Because you’re proud of everything that you achieved. Your email archives are full of positive comments from management and customers.

You exceeded your sales quota. You may even be winning awards for your performance.

– Tip: Take pride in your accomplishments on a regular basis by writing a short monthly summary of your work accomplishments. You may be pleasantly surprised at your results!

9. You don’t avoid requests for help; Instead, you help the people around you.

Helping a coworker out is a sign that you are a leader who understands the importance of teamwork. Helping out at work takes a variety of forms.

For example, you may offer to cover a coworker’s responsibilities when she covers on vacation. Or you may buy a treat for someone who is having a tough day. When you love your work, you are proactive in helping the people around you reach their goals.

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10. You don’t run away from conflict, but you manage it effectively.

Even when you love your work, conflict is bound to happen. Whether you have different personalities or different understandings of a contract, conflict happens at the office. Effective professionals face conflict head on and resolve problems.

Once conflicts are solved, they can get back to winning and helping their coworkers.

11. You don’t get bored at work; Instead, you realize there is always something new to discover.

Having a sense of wonder is a key element of happiness. At the office, discovering something new each week keeps work interesting. You might, for example, discover some Microsoft Excel hacks from the department’s resident Excel ninja.

Or you might learn how to get funding for your MBA! The potential discoveries are limitless. Seek out those discoveries and you will ultimately become happier at work.

Featured photo credit: Happiness/geralt via pixabay.com

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Bruce Harpham

Bruce Harpham is a Project Management Professional and Founder and CEO of Project Management Hacks.

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Last Updated on April 25, 2019

How to Write a Career Change Resume (With Examples)

How to Write a Career Change Resume (With Examples)

Shifting careers, tiny or big, can be paralyzing. Whether your desire for a career change is self-driven or involuntary, you can manage the panic and fear by understanding ‘why’ you are making the change.

Your ability to clearly and confidently articulate your transferable skills makes it easier for employers to understand how you are best suited for the job or industry.

A well written career change resume that shows you have read the job description and markets your transferable skills can increase your success for a career change.

3 Steps to Prepare Your Mind Before Working on the Resume

Step 1: Know Your ‘Why’

Career changes can be an unnerving experience. However, you can lessen the stress by making informed decisions through research.

One of the best ways to do this is by conducting informational interviews.[1] Invest time to gather information from diverse sources. Speaking to people in the career or industry that you’re pursuing will help you get clarity and check your assumptions.

Here are some questions to help you get clear on your career change:

  • What’s your ideal work environment?
  • What’s most important to you right now?
  • What type of people do you like to work with?
  • What are the work skills that you enjoy doing the most?
  • What do you like to do so much that you lose track of time?
  • Whose career inspires you? What is it about his/her career that you admire?
  • What do you dislike about your current role and work environment?

Step 2: Get Clear on What Your Transferable Skills Are[2]

The data gathered from your research and informational interviews will give you a clear picture of the career change that you want. There will likely be a gap between your current experience and the experience required for your desired job. This is your chance to tell your personal story and make it easy for recruiters to understand the logic behind your career change.

Make a list and describe your existing skills and experience. Ask yourself:

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What experience do you have that is relevant to the new job or industry?

Include any experience e.g., work, community, volunteer, or helping a neighbour. The key here is ANY relevant experience. Don’t be afraid to list any tasks that may seem minor to you right now. Remember this is about showcasing the fact that you have experience in the new area of work.

What will the hiring manager care about and how can you demonstrate this?

Based on your research you’ll have an idea of what you’ll be doing in the new job or industry. Be specific and show how your existing experience and skills make you the best candidate for the job. Hiring managers will likely scan your resume in less than 7 seconds. Make it easy for them to see the connection between your skills and the skills that are needed.

Clearly identifying your transferable skills and explaining the rationale for your career change shows the employer that you are making a serious and informed decision about your transition.

Step 3: Read the Job Posting

Each job application will be different even if they are for similar roles. Companies use different language to describe how they conduct business. For example, some companies use words like ‘systems’ while other companies use ‘processes’.

When you review the job description, pay attention to the sections that describe WHAT you’ll be doing and the qualifications/skills. Take note of the type of language and words that the employer uses. You’ll want to use similar language in your resume to show that your experience meets their needs.

5 Key Sections on Your Career Change Resume (Example)

The content of the examples presented below are tailored for a high school educator who wants to change careers to become a client engagement manager, however, you can easily use the same structure for your career change resume.

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Don’t forget to write a well crafted cover letter for your career change to match your updated resume. Your career change cover letter will provide the context and personal story that you’re not able to show in a resume.

1. Contact Information and Header

Create your own letterhead that includes your contact information. Remember to hyperlink your email and LinkedIn profile. Again, make it easy for the recruiter to contact you and learn more about you.

Example:

Jill Young

Toronto, ON | [email protected] | 416.222.2222 | LinkedIn Profile

2. Qualification Highlights or Summary

This is the first section that recruiters will see to determine if you meet the qualifications for the job. Use the language from the job posting combined with your transferable skills to show that you are qualified for the role.

Keep this section concise and use 3 to 4 bullets. Be specific and focus on the qualifications needed for the specific job that you’re applying to. This section should be tailored for each job application. What makes you qualified for the role?

Example:

Qualifications Summary

  • Experienced managing multiple stakeholder interests by building a strong network of relationships to support a variety of programs
  • Experienced at resolving problems in a timely and diplomatic manner
  • Ability to work with diverse groups and ensure collaboration while meeting tight timelines

3. Work Experience

Only present experiences that are relevant to the job posting. Focus on your specific transferable skills and how they apply to the new role.

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How this section is structured will depend on your experience and the type of career change you are making.

For example, if you are changing industries you may want to list your roles before the company name. However, if you want to highlight some of the big companies you’ve worked with then you may want to list the company name first. Just make sure that you are consistent throughout your resume.

Be clear and concise. Use 1 to 4 bullets to highlight your relevant work experiences for each job you list on your resume. Ensure that the information demonstrates your qualifications for the new job. Remember to align all the dates on your resume to the right margin.

Example:

Work Experience

Theater Production Manager 2018 – present

YourLocalTheater

  • Collaborated with diverse groups of people to ensure a successful production while meeting tight timelines

4. Education

List your formal education in this section. For example, the name of the degrees you received and the school who issued it. To eliminate biases, I would recommend removing the year you graduated.

Example:

Education

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  • Bachelor of Education, University of Western Ontario
  • Bachelor of Theater Studies with Honors, University of British Columbia

5. Other Activities or Interests

When you took an inventory of your transferable skills, what experiences were relevant to your new career path (that may not fit in the other resume sections?).

Example:

Other Activities

  • Mentor, Pathways to Education
  • Volunteer lead for coordinating all community festival vendors

Bonus Tips

Remember these core resume tips to help you effectively showcase your transferable skills:

  • CAR (Context Action Result) method. Remember that each bullet on your resume needs to state the situation, the action you took and the result of your experience.
  • Font. Use modern Sans Serif fonts like Tahoma, Verdana, or Arial.
  • White space. Ensure that there is enough white space on your resume by adjusting your margins to a minimum of 1.5 cm. Your resume should be no more than two pages long.
  • Tailor your resume for each job posting. Pay attention to the language and key words used on the job posting and adjust your resume accordingly. Make the application process easy on yourself by creating your own resume template. Highlight sections that you need to tailor for each job application.
  • Get someone else to review your resume. Ideally you’d want to have someone with industry or hiring experience to provide you with insights to hone your resume. However, you also want to have someone proofread your resume for grammar and spelling errors.

The Bottom Line

It’s essential that you know why you want to change careers. Setting this foundation not only helps you with your resume, but can also help you to change your cover letter, adjust your LinkedIn profile, network during your job search, and during interviews.

Ensure that all the content on your resume is relevant for the specific job you’re applying to.

Remember to focus on the job posting and your transferable skills. You have a wealth of experience to draw from – don’t discount any of it! It’s time to showcase and brand yourself in the direction you’re moving towards!

More Resources to Help You Change Career Swiftly

Featured photo credit: Parker Byrd via unsplash.com

Reference

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