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10 Simple Steps to Plan a Successful Conference

10 Simple Steps to Plan a Successful Conference

    My husband is planning a conference right now, and at the same time, I am starting to organize a one-day event. Both of us feel pretty daunted, so I thought it might be helpful to us – and to others – to streamline the process into ten simple steps.

    1. Determine the “Why”

     Sit down with your partners (if you have them) and talk through the end goal of the conference. Is it to generate revenue? Secure new clients? Get publicity? Keep this goal in mind as you proceed through the rest of the list.

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    2. Create your wish list

    In an ideal world, what would your conference look like? Jot down details such as location, speakers, number and quality of participants, food, and fun activities.

    3. Draft a budget

    How will you pay for your event? Investigate any resources you can use for free (such as donated space) and what you can charge participants to cover costs and still make a profit (if that is a goal). Make a budget spreadsheet listing the major cost items of your wish list – location rental, staff, speakers, meals, signage, audio/visual equipment, printed materials, giveaways, and fun extras. Don’t forget to include costs for marketing the event, such as a website, and build in a 10 to 15 percent cushion in case expenses run over.

    4. Choose practically

     Cost will obviously be a factor in choosing where to hold your event and what services to provide, but so will attendance. You want to select a location that is either in the same city as many participants, or close to it.

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    Your ideal speaker may be Donald Trump, but realistically you probably need to go with a less-pricey option. A resort is certainly appealing, but does it have enough meeting and personal rooms, and will participants enjoy the locale enough to pay a premium?

    Consider polling participants from past events like yours to understand what’s most important when attending such a conference and make selections based on this feedback.

    5. Work with vendors

    Begin working with the service providers of the items in your budget spreadsheet as early as possible.  Understand what will be provided in each case, and review contracts and cancellation policies carefully (for instance, you need to know if the hotel will provide A/V equipment and support in its meeting rooms, or if you need to bring that in yourself). If you are in need of a specific vendor, I recommend checking with the Convention and Visitors Bureau in your destination city.

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    6. Find speakers

    Reach out to your network to identify the speaker(s) who will best help you achieve the conference’s objectives and are within your budget (do not ask or expect professional speakers to appear for free). Review demo videos and talk with people who have heard this speaker before. When communicating with a speaker, provide her with ample details so she can customize her remarks to your audience, and make sure you are on top of her travel arrangements and other needs.

    7. Set the agenda

    Draft a detailed timeline for your conference that starts early (8AM is reasonable) and ends early (4PM).  Schedule a mix of formal speakers, small group workshops, and free networking time. Plan to feed your participants every few hours, either with a full meal or a break snack. After the day’s agenda is complete, consider hosting a dinner at a nearby restaurant or local entertainment such as a tour.

    8. Market your event

    Create a logo and color scheme for your event, and display it on an event website with online registration. Rally your troops to spread the word through e-mail and guest posts in online media targeted to your audience. If appropriate, make use of local event listing websites. Consider offering discounts to organizations that send more than one participant.

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    9. Plan for a stress-free “Day Of”

     Communicate actively with your participants and vendors in advance so they know where to be and what to expect. Get their contact information and make sure they have yours. Tour the facility before your conference begins to make sure your staff is in place and everything is in working order.  As things wind down and invoices come in, review them line-by-line so that you can resolve disputes on the spot.

    10. Evaluate your event

     Now that you are ready to go into the event-planning business full time, let’s see what you can learn for next time. Have your participants fill out a paper or electronic evaluation form and look for common pieces of feedback.

    (Photo credit: at seminar via Shutterstock)

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    Last Updated on September 23, 2020

    Do What You Love and Love What You Do to Achieve More

    Do What You Love and Love What You Do to Achieve More

    Are you waking up each day looking for that perfect thing, activity, or job that will make your life work? Or, maybe you are looking for that perfect relationship. Once you “get” this new thing that will allow you to do what you love, you are sure that you will be happy forever.

    In reality, life doesn’t work like that, and we would probably get bored if it did. There is likely no one thing, experience, or activity that will keep you feeling passionate and engaged all the time. What’s important is staying connected to what you love and continuing to grow in the process.

    Here, we’ll talk about how to get started doing what you love and achieving more in life through the motivation it brings. Doing this doesn’t have to take a long time; it just takes determination and energy.

    Most People Already Know Their Passion

    So many people walk around in life “looking for” their passion. They look for it as if true passion is some mysterious thing that is difficult to find and runs away once you find it. However, the problem is rarely lack of passion.

    Most of us already know what we love to do. We know what excites us, even if we haven’t done it for years. Instead, we focus on what we think we “must” do.

    For example, maybe you love building model cars or painting pet portraits. Yet, each day you work a completely unrelated job and make no time for the activity you already know you love. The truth is you probably don’t need to find your passion; you just need to start doing what you already know you’re passionate about[1].

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    No Activity Is Exciting All the Time

    Even people who are living their dream lifestyle or working their dream job don’t love it all the time. Every job or lifestyle has parts of it that we won’t like.

    Let’s say your dream is to become an actress, and you succeed. You may not enjoy the process of auditioning and facing rejection. You may experience moments of boredom when you practice your lines over and over again. But the overall experience is totally worth it.

    Most of life is like that. Don’t set yourself up for disappointment by demanding that life be perfect all the time. If things were perfect and easy, you would ultimately stop learning and growing, and life would begin to lack even more meaning in that case.

    Be grateful for both the good and bad moments as they are both entirely necessary if you genuinely want to do what you love and love what you do.

    Doing What You Love May Not Be Easy

    Living a life you love is unlikely to be easy. If it was, you would not grow very much as a person. And, if you think about a great book or movie, the growth of the main character is what matters most.

    What if the challenges you meet along your path to living a life you love were designed to make you grow as a person? You may actually start looking forward to challenges instead of dreading them. An easy life hardly ever makes a compelling story.

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    If you struggle to overcome challenges, try writing them down each time you encounter one. Then, write down three ways you could tackle it. Try one, and if it doesn’t work, try another. This way, you’ll learn what does and doesn’t work for you.

    How to Do What You Love

    There are many small steps you can take to ensure you are making time to do the things you love. Start with these, and you’ll likely find that you’re already on the right track.

    1. Choose Your Priorities Wisely

    Many people claim they want to do something, yet they don’t do it. The truth is they might not really want to do it in the first place[2].

    We all end up following through on what matters most to us. We make decisions moment by moment about what we need to focus on. What we choose to do is what we deem most important in our lives.

    If there is something you claim you want to do but you don’t do it, try asking yourself how much you really want it or where it’s currently placed on priority list. Are there other things you want more?

    Be honest with yourself: what you currently do each day is a reflection of your priorities. Recognize that you can change your priorities at any time.

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    Make a list of your priorities. Really take the time to think this through. Then, ask yourself if what you are doing each day reflects them. For example, if you believe your top priority is spending more time with your family, but you consistently take on extra hours at work, you’re not really prioritizing things in the way you think you are.

    If this is happening, it’s time to make a change.

    2. Do One Small Thing Each Day

    As stated above, doing what you love doesn’t have to mean finding that perfect job that makes you want to jump out of bed in the morning. If you want to do what you love, start with one small thing each day.

    Maybe you love reading a good book. Take ten minutes before bed to read.

    Maybe you love swimming. Get a membership at the local YMCA, and go there for thirty minutes after work each day.

    Dedicating even a short amount of time to something that brings you joy each day will improve your life overall. You may find that, over time, a career path related to what you love to do pops up. After doing the thing you love each day, you’ll be more than prepared to take it on when the opportunity arises.

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    If you need help making time for your passions, check out this article to get started.

    3. Prepare to Make Sacrifices

    If you are an exceptionally busy person (aren’t we all?), you may have to make sacrifices in order to make space for the things you are passionate about. Maybe you take on less extra hours at the office or take thirty minutes away from another hobby in order to develop another that you enjoy.

    Looking at your priority list will help you decide what can get put on the back burner and what can’t. Remember, do this thinking about what will help you feel good about how you’re spending your time. 

    For example, if you love writing but rarely make time for it, consider getting up 30 minutes earlier than normal. Or instead of browsing your phone for 30 minutes before bed, you can write instead. There is always a way to find time for what you love.

    Final Thoughts

    If you love what you do, each day becomes a joyful adventure. If you don’t love what you are doing, life feels like a chore. The best way to achieve success is to design a life you love and live it every day.

    Remember, doing something you love doesn’t have to include big gestures or time-consuming projects. Start small and grow from there.

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    Featured photo credit: William Recinos via unsplash.com

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