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10 Positive Signs That You Are Going to Be An Entrepreneur

10 Positive Signs That You Are Going to Be An Entrepreneur

Did you always know you were going to be an entrepreneur? Well if you can recognize a few of the following positive signs, then chances are you have been on the entrepreneurial path for a while now.

1. You see opportunities everywhere

You can’t help yourself: you see the potential in every thing and every person. When you wake up in the morning, you’re raring to go because there are ideas to think up, tasks to set into motion, and businesses to be built.

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2. You like to scratch your own itch and solve problems

When you see something that could be done better or a massive problem, you’re not afraid to step up to the plate to solve it. That usually means creating something that solves other people’s problems, too. In turn, these solutions can take on a life of their own and become businesses that make an dent in the industry.

3. You think of something and immediately look for how it could turn into a business

Maybe you like to think up new stories. Or you’re great at coming up with delicious recipes. Coding new software is fun for you. All of your imagination is engaged when you’re having fun! These ideas that keep coming to you are all fodder for your entrepreneurial side. You look for ways to turn them into viable businesses, or people who can do it for you.

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4. You used to sell stuff as a child

You know you’re an entrepreneur when you sought experiences to hone your sales skills as a child. Maybe you sold baseball cards like Gary Vaynerchuck or you had a lemonade stand on the corner. Or maybe, like me, you built websites for your parents’ friends and started freelancing before you even knew what the term meant. You likely got hooked on earning money for yourself and decided it was a good trait to take on.

5. You think in terms of investments: time and money

With any task you undertake, whether it’s watching TV the evenings or mowing the lawn on weekends, you consider the time and money investment and return. If you watch one hour of television, that’s one hour less for your business’ development. On the other hand, hiring someone to mow your lawn gives you back time to further your business dreams. You’re constantly crunching numbers and optimizing how you use the resources you have, so you can get more down the line.

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6. You assess other people for leadership qualities

You get that your businesses can become bottlenecked if you’re always the one in the middle, so you look for leaders who can help your businesses grow. When you meet someone at a cocktail party, you’re looking to see what role they could fulfill at your current or future companies. You’re also adamant about training and mentoring people who will one day be able to take your spot, so you can go on to build your next business.

7. You love talking about other people’s business success

There’s no such thing as bad-mouthing success in your house. You know that you need to look positively upon successful entrepreneurs to become one, and you love to soak up all the “how-to” advice you can glean from people’s success stories.

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8. You read biographies of your favorite business moguls

You love to get a glimpse at how things went down and how you can apply these lessons to your own life and business. Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Warren Buffett — they’re all familiar business mentors through their biographies, and you know which traits you want to take on from each of your business heroes.

9. You’re persistent to a fault

Giving up is not in your vocabulary. You know that if this idea doesn’t pan out, there will be opportunities to kick butt with your next business move. You’ve tried and failed before, and you know you’ll make mistakes, but you take each one in stride because you’re in it for the marathon and not the sprint.

10. You care about making the world a better place

You know that business is the vehicle for change on a massive scale, and you’re committed to making the world a better place. Starting a business is something you’re motivated to do because you believe in what you can offer the world, and you know you’re the person to make it happen.

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Last Updated on July 16, 2020

How to Decline a Job Offer Gracefully (With Email Examples)

How to Decline a Job Offer Gracefully (With Email Examples)

Generally, if you’re in a position to decline a job offer, it’s a high-quality problem. Maybe you were offered a better position at a different company, or perhaps you were offered the same position at a different organization but for better pay (or perks). Or maybe, after sitting down and discussing the offer with your family, you decided that the travel requirements were too intense. Perhaps the company where you currently work agreed to match the new offer, and once you examined the pros and cons, you realized it made more sense to stay.

Whatever the reason[1], your charge now is knowing how to decline a job offer gracefully. As a courtesy to the company who extended you the job offer, you want to decline quickly, giving the hiring manager a chance to make the offer to the candidate who was the runner-up for the job. You also want to express your appreciation. And, given today’s rocky economy, it makes sense to politely decline the job offer in a way that will hopefully keep the door open for you should your circumstances change.

If you’re not sure how to decline a job offer, check out the following tips to get through it.

3 Ways to Decline a Job Offer Gracefully (With Examples)

1. Show Gratitude

The hiring manager likely spent several hours on your job application—between reading your cover letter, reviewing your resume, and interviewing you either in person or via a videoconferencing platform. Recruitment is a long and sometimes tedious process for any employer. There is always competition for every open job, and the hiring manager may have pushed your candidacy over others in the queue.

For these reasons, your note needs to express thoughtfulness and genuine appreciation. That said, it needn’t be lengthy.

The following example is concise and expresses gratitude in several ways, providing a good example for how you can decline a job offer gracefully:

Subject Line: Job Offer – [Your Name]

Dear Mr./Ms. ________[Hiring manager’s last name],

Thank you for offering me the position of _______ [job title] with _________ [company name]. I greatly appreciate the vote of confidence that comes with your offer. However, after carefully considering the opportunities for career advancement, I have decided to stay where I am.

I sincerely thank you for the time and consideration you devoted to my application, interview, and follow-up. I appreciate your graciousness and consummate professionalism throughout.

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I wish you success in all the company’s undertakings that you outlined. Thank you again for extending the opportunity to work with you.

Sincerely,

[Your name]

2. Give a Reason, but Don’t Elaborate

If you had several interviews at the company, then saying why you are turning down the offer shows respect and professional courtesy. It’s fine to say that you took a different job offer, decided to stay at your company, or even felt that the salary was not sufficient. The trick is to say it succinctly.

The following example does just that:

Subject Line: Job Offer – [Your Name]

Dear Mr./Ms. _______ [Hiring manager’s name],

I greatly appreciate your offer of the position of _______ [job title]. I was very impressed with you and the staff members who interviewed me, as well as the direction of the company. I regret, however, that I must decline your offer due to the salary offered.

I sincerely appreciate the opportunity to have met you and your team and to learn about your company. Again, I am grateful for the positive interviewing experience with your company and for the job offer.

I wish great success with your plans to move forward.

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Best regards,

[Your name]

3. Offer to Stay in Touch

This technique isn’t for everyone, but if you felt a strong connection with the person who interviewed you, or if you could see yourself working at the company in a few years, it might make sense to offer to keep in touch.

Remember that hiring managers switch companies, too, and it’s always a good idea to have a hiring manager think well of you!

The following example includes an offer to stay in touch in a gentle way:

Subject Line: Job Offer – [Your Name]

Dear Mr./Ms. ________[Hiring manager’s name],

I am writing to personally thank you for offering me the position of ________ [job title] at _______[company name]. I enjoyed meeting you and having a chance to meet the other members of the team. It was an extremely difficult decision for me, but I have accepted a position at another company.

I genuinely appreciate the time you devoted to interviewing me and to sharing your insights on the direction of the company. I hope we might stay in touch as I value your visionary ideas about our industry’s future.

Again, thank you for your time and consideration, and I wish you all the best for your continued success.

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Respectfully,

[Your name]

Should You Hold out for Your Dream Job?

If you interviewed with two companies, and your dream company is dragging out its decision while your second choice company has made you an offer, what’s the best direction to take? As long as the job offer from your second choice company is in keeping with your goals for upward mobility, added responsibility, and increased salary, you are better off accepting the extended offer for two reasons.

First, the reason the dream company is prolonging the process may be because it has made an offer to another and is negotiating with another candidate. Second, if you accept another offer and withdraw your candidacy from the dream company, the hiring manager will note your desirability to another (possibly competing) employer and may try to recruit you in the future.

It is the epitome of poor form to decline a job after accepting it, even if your dream company finally comes through with an offer. This puts the company that made the original offer in a huge bind, particularly if it has already sent rejections to its other candidates and is taking steps for on-boarding you. This could make you a pariah at the company, and in any industry, news travels fast and far.

The Best Medium for Declining a Job Offer

Should you send your response via email? Or pick up the telephone and call the hiring manager? The most professional response is to use the same method they used to extend you the offer. If they offered you the job via email, then feel free to email your reply. If they called you or left a voicemail message, then picking up the telephone is the preferred method. Do your best to call during business hours.

To be as poised as possible, you may want to write out your rejection and practice saying it a few times. Time it to make sure it does not exceed 30 seconds. (Even if you leave a voicemail, you may need to also write them an email for their records.)

If the hiring manager wants to chat further, don’t give the impression that you want to quickly end the call. Give the conversation your full attention to let the employer know that you value the relationship that you have built. It’s important not to burn bridges if you should decide to apply at the company again in the future—or at another company where the manager happens to transfer to. Remain discreet, but converse with decorum if the other party wants to prolong the conversation.

Dotting I’s and Crossing T’s

Always include your contact information, including your phone number, although the company already has it. Double check your communication for typos. If you know a candidate that you believe would be a perfect fit for the job, you may want to mention it. (First make sure he or she really wants the job, though. Reach out to them before suggesting their name.)

Be sure to send your email within normal business hours. Remember that you are not trying to avoid the hiring manager—you’re opening up a line of communication with her or him that you may well use again down the road.

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When They Go Low, You Go High

Granted, not every potential employer has a winning personality. You may have decided well before the offer was extended that this was not a person with whom you wished to work. Or, the company culture[2] may have felt like it would not be a good fit, and you’ve since corroborated the incompatible impression with people in your network.

Whatever gut feelings signaled to you that you needed to turn down an offer, don’t include or even allude to them in your rejection letter[3]. Stating that the position is not the right fit for you and your career is all that you need to disclose.

This final example is for when you prefer not to disclose the reason for your rejection, and you’re looking for a kind, concise way of turning down the job:

Subject Line: Job Offer – [Your Name]

Dear Mr./Ms. ________[Hiring manager’s name],

I genuinely appreciate your taking the time to interview me and the consideration you gave me as a job candidate. I have, however, decided to decline your offer of the ______ [job title], as I have come to realize that the position is not the right fit for me at this time.

I wish you well in your search for the best-suited candidate.

Cordially,

[Your name]

Final Thoughts

Learning how to decline a job offer politely and professionally will keep you in good graces with the prospective employer and help the person better accept your rejection. Let the person know that your change of heart in pursuing a new job isn’t personal, and that you found the experience rewarding.

When you show gratitude and let the hiring manager know that the time and effort invested in you is appreciated, you continue to strengthen your professional standing.

More on How to Decline a Job Offer

Featured photo credit: Christina @ wocintechchat.com via unsplash.com

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