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10 Cities Around The World With The Most Job Opportunities

10 Cities Around The World With The Most Job Opportunities

Thanks to PricewaterhouseCoopers’ (PwC) 2014 report on Cities of Opportunity, job seekers have a handy list of some of the best cities to find a job across the world. Using 10 indicators to look at the factors that contribute to a well-balanced city, the study compared 30 different cities and ordered them based on how they rank for the most opportunities. Below, we take a closer look at the top 10.

10. Chicago

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    Today, Chicago is the third largest city in the U.S.–right after New York City and Los Angeles–with a population of 2.7 million people. Even so, PwC has ranked Chicago positively in cost, quality of life, and air quality. It’s situated in the top 10 for ease of doing business. With around 30 Fortune 500 companies based here, it’s no wonder that the job opportunities are high here.

    Job seekers here will flourish best in legal occupations, with an average salary running around $110,060 for this type of work in Chicago, says Bizjournals.com. Other high-paying jobs in the city are those in managerial positions, computer and mathematics, and architecture and engineering.

    9. Sydney

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      Sydney has long held a great reputation for work-life balance, beauty, and friendliness. PwC puts it as number one for sustainability and livability. Sydney is the center of financial, manufacturing, and cultural opportunities in Australia, making it a thriving place for business opportunities.

      8. Hong Kong

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        Hong Kong is among one of the best cities in the world for quality of life. In fact, it has one of the highest life expectancies world-wide. What’s more Hong Kong’s economy is ranked number one for economic freedom. Along with all these perks of living in Hong Kong, it’s rated number two by PwC for ease of doing business.

        7. Stockholm

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          As one of the fastest growing cities in Europe, Stockholm comes with numerous business opportunities. Stockholm is booming with a lively tech industry, with nearly 700 high-tech companies in the area. The city also focuses a lot of attention on sustainability and green technology. What’s more, according to Fortune magazine, Stockholm is one of the best cities for start-ups.

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          6. Paris

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            Paris sits at the top of PwC’s list for Intellectual Capital and Innovation. It’s full of fantastic museums, respected universities, and exceptional libraries to broaden the mind, adding a perk to individuals who choose to do business here. What’s especially great about the city is that it has some of the lowest unemployment rates in Europe, says JobsinParis.fr. Individuals in human resources, sales, and finance will find some of the highest salaries here.

            5. San Francisco

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              The thing that makes San Francisco so hot with opportunities is that it is home to some of the world’s largest companies. Plus, several huge companies like Google have outposts here. Those people in managerial positions, legal occupations, healthcare practitioning, and computer and mathematics will enjoy high salaries as reported by BizJournals.com.

              4. Toronto

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                Toronto maintains a high reputation for quality of life, ranking in the top three for safety, health, infrastructure, and security and transportation in PwC’s report. It also sits at number four for ease of doing business. Toronto thrives on distribution, industrial, and financial industries with a huge focus on banking and stocks.

                3. Singapore

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                  This city sits near the top of many lists outlined by PwC. Among these lists, it’s in the top three for transportation and infrastructure, city gateway, and ease of doing business. Singapore’s economy is heavy in electronics, chemicals, and services, and the city is a hub for wealth management, making it a fantastic place for people in a variety of industries. Medical doctors also receive some of the highest salaries here. What’s more, its economy has been ranked as the most open in the world, least corrupt, and most pro-business.

                  2. New York

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                    New York City is thriving with opportunities as the largest city in the United States, with opportunities available in a variety of industries across the board. PwC ranked the Big Apple in the top three for ease of doing business and second for most desired city for relocation. This city features huge business for stock exchanges and finance, but individuals in fashion, publishing, entertainment, technology, and more will find a wealth of opportunities here.

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                    1. London

                    from Trey Ratcliff at www.stuckincustoms.com

                      Sitting at number one for technology readiness, city gateway, and economic clout in PwC’s report, London is one of the hottest cities for job opportunities today. London is home to the most billionaires world-wide, with an economy focused on finance for international businesses. Senior executives, medical doctors, marketing and sales directors, and individuals in legal occupations will find some of the highest-paying jobs here.

                      Image Credits:
                      Chicago via Flickr by Matt Becker
                      Sydney Once Again via Flickr by Clint Sharp
                      A Symphony of Light – Hong Kong via Flickr by Spreg Ben
                      Spring Moon Over Stockholm via Flickr by Tobias Lindman
                      Paris Skyline at Sunset via Flickr by James Whitesmith
                      San Francisco Skyline Lighting via Flickr by Sudheer G
                      Hello Toronto via Flickr by Robert
                      Singapore via Flickr by Mike Behnken
                      New York City via Flickr by Rishad Daroowala
                      Approaching London via Flickr by Trey Ratcliff

                      Featured photo credit: _Davo_ via flickr.com

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                      Last Updated on March 25, 2020

                      How to Set Ambitious Career Goals (With Examples)

                      How to Set Ambitious Career Goals (With Examples)

                      Taking your work to the next level means setting and keeping career goals. A career goal is a targeted objective that explains what you want your ultimate profession to be.

                      Defining career goals is a critical step to achieving success. You need to know where you’re going in order to get there. Knowing what your career goals are isn’t just important for you–it’s important for potential employers too. The relationship between an employer and an employee works best when your goals for the future and their goals align. Saying, “Oh, I don’t know. I’ll do anything,” makes you seem indecisive, and opens you up to taking on ill-fitting tasks that won’t lead you to your dream life.

                      Career goal templates’ one-size-fits-all approach won’t consider your unique goals and experiences. They won’t help you stand out, and they may not reflect your full potential.

                      In this article, I’ll help you to define your career goals with SMART goal framework, and will provide you with a list of examples goals for work and career.

                      How to Define Your Career Goal with SMART

                      Instead of relying on a generalized framework to explain your vision, use a tried-and-true goal-setting model. SMART is an acronym for “Specific, Measurable, Action-oriented, Realistic with Timelines.”[1] The SMART framework demystifies goals by breaking them into smaller steps.

                      Helpful hints when setting SMART career goals:

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                      • Start with short-term goals first. Work on your short-term goals, and then progress the long-term interests.[2] Short-term goals are those things which take 1-3 years to complete. Long-term goals take 3-5 years to do. As you succeed in your short-term goals, that success should feed into accomplishing your long-term goals.
                      • Be specific, but don’t overdo it. You need to define your career goals, but if you make them too specific, then they become unattainable. Instead of saying, “I want to be the next CEO of Apple, where I’ll create a billion-dollar product,” try something like, “My goal is to be the CEO of a successful company.”
                      • Get clear on how you’re going to reach your goals. You should be able to explain the actions you’ll take to advance your career. If you can’t explain the steps, then you need to break your goal down into more manageable chunks.
                      • Don’t be self-centered. Your work should not only help you advance, but it should also support the goals of your employer. If your goals differ too much, then it might be a sign that the job you’ve taken isn’t a good fit.

                      If you want to learn more about setting SMART Goals, watch the video below to learn how you can set SMART career goals.

                      After you’re clear on how to set SMART goals, you can use this framework to tackle other aspects of your work. For instance, you might set SMART goals to improve your performance review, look for a new job, or shift your focus to a different career.

                      We’ll cover examples of ways to use SMART goals to meet short-term career goals in the next section.

                      Why You Need an Individual Development Plan

                      Setting goals is one part of the larger formula for success. You may know what you want to do, but you also have to figure out what skills you have, what you lack, and where your greatest strengths and weaknesses are.

                      One of the best ways to understand your capabilities is by using the Science Careers Individual Development Plan skills assessment. It’s free, and all you need to do is register an account and take a few assessments.

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                      These assessments will help you determine if your career goals are realistic. You’ll come away with a better understanding of your unique talents and skill-sets. You may decide to change some of your career goals or alter your timeline based on what you learn.

                      40 Examples of Goals for Work & Career

                      All this talk of goal-setting and self-assessment may sound great in theory, but perhaps you need some inspiration to figure out what your goals should be.

                      For Changing a Job

                      1. Attend more networking events and make new contacts.
                      2. Achieve a promotion to __________ position.
                      3. Get a raise.
                      4. Plan and take a vacation this year.
                      5. Agree to take on new responsibilities.
                      6. Develop meaningful relationships with your coworkers and clients.
                      7. Ask for feedback on a regular basis.
                      8. Learn how to say, “No,” when you are asked to take on too much.
                      9. Delegate tasks that you no longer need to be responsible for.
                      10. Strive to be in a leadership role in __ number of years.

                      For Switching Career Path

                      1. Pick up and learn a new skill.
                      2. Find a mentor.
                      3. Become a volunteer in the field that interests you.
                      4. Commit to getting training or going back to school.
                      5. Read the most recent books related to your field.
                      6. Decide whether you are happy with your work-life balance and make changes if necessary. [3]
                      7. Plan what steps you need to take to change careers.[4]
                      8. Compile a list of people who could be character references or submit recommendations.
                      9. Commit to making __ number of new contacts in the field this year.
                      10. Create a financial plan.

                      For Getting a Promotion

                      1. Reduce business expenses by a certain percentage.
                      2. Stop micromanaging your team members.
                      3. Become a mentor.
                      4. Brainstorm ways that you could improve your productivity and efficiency at work
                      5. Seek a new training opportunity to address a weakness.[5]
                      6. Find a way to organize your work space.[6]
                      7. Seek feedback from a boss or trusted coworker every week/ month/ quarter.
                      8. Become a better communicator.
                      9. Find new ways to be a team player.
                      10. Learn how to reduce work hours without compromising productivity.

                      For Acing a Job Interview

                      1. Identify personal boundaries at work and know what you should do to make your day more productive and manageable.
                      2. Identify steps to create a professional image for yourself.
                      3. Go after the career of your dreams to find work that does not feel like a job.
                      4. Look for a place to pursue your interest and apply your knowledge and skills.
                      5. Find a new way to collaborate with experts in your field.
                      6. Identify opportunities to observe others working in the career you want.
                      7. Become more creative and break out of your comfort zone.
                      8. Ask to be trained more relevant skills for your work.
                      9. Ask for opportunities to explore the field and widen your horizon
                      10. Set your eye on a specific award at work and go for it.

                      Career Goal Setting FAQs

                      I’m sure you still have some questions about setting your own career goals, so here I’m listing out the most commonly asked questions about career goals.

                      1. What if I’m not sure what I want my career to be?

                      If you’re uncertain, be honest about it. Let the employer know as much as you know about what you want to do. Express your willingness to use your strengths to contribute to the company. When you take this approach, back up your claim with some examples.

                      If you’re not even sure where to begin with your career, check out this guide:

                      How to Find Your Ideal Career Path Without Wasting Time on Jobs Not Suitable for You

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                      2. Is it okay to lie about my career goals?

                      Lying to potential employers is bound to end in disaster. In the interview, a lie can make you look foolish because you won’t know how to answer follow up questions.

                      Even if you think your career goal may not precisely align with the employer’s expectations for a long-term hire, be open and honest. There’s probably more common ground than they realize, and it’s up to you to bridge any gaps in expectations.

                      Being honest and explaining these connections shows your employer that you’ve put a lot of thought into this application. You aren’t just telling them what they want to hear.

                      3. Is it better to have an ambitious goal, or should I play it safe?

                      You should have a goal that challenges you, but SMART goals are always reasonable. If you put forth a goal that is way beyond your capabilities, you will seem naive. Making your goals too easy shows a lack of motivation.

                      Employers want new hires who are able to self-reflect and are willing to take on challenges.

                      4. Can I have several career goals?

                      It’s best to have one clearly-defined career goal and stick with it. (Of course, you can still have goals in other areas of your life.) Having a single career goal shows that you’re capable of focusing, and it shows that you like to accomplish what you set out to do.

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                      On the other hand, you might have multiple related career goals. This could mean that you have short-term goals that dovetail into your ultimate long-term career goal. You might also have several smaller goals that feed into a single purpose.

                      For example, if you want to become a lawyer, you might become a paralegal and attend law school at the same time. If you want to be a school administrator, you might have initial goals of being a classroom teacher and studying education policy. In both cases, these temporary jobs and the extra education help you reach your ultimate goal.

                      Summary

                      You’ll have to devote some time to setting career goals, but you’ll be so much more successful with some direction. Remember to:

                      • Set SMART goals. SMART goals are Specific, Measurable, Action-oriented, and Realistic with Timelines. When you set goals with these things in mind, you are likely to achieve the outcomes you want.
                      • Have short-term and long-term goals. Short-term career goals can be completed in 1-3 years, while long-term goals will take 3-5 years to finish. Your short-term goals should set you up to accomplish your long-term goals.
                      • Assess your capabilities by coming up with an Individual Development Plan. Knowing how to set goals won’t help you if you don’t know yourself. Understand what your strengths and weaknesses are by taking some self-assessments.
                      • Choose goals that are appropriate to your ultimate aims. Your career goals should be relevant to one another. If they aren’t, then you may need to narrow your focus. Your goals should match the type of job that you want and the quality of life that you want to lead.
                      • Be clear about your goals with potential employers. Always be honest with potential employers about what you want to do with your life. If your goals differ from the company’s objectives, find a way bridge the gap between what you want for yourself and what your employer expects.

                      By doing goal-setting work now, you’ll be able to make conscious choices on your career path. You can always adjust your plan if things change for you, but the key is to give yourself a road map for success.

                      More Tips About Setting Work Goals

                      Featured photo credit: Tyler Franta via unsplash.com

                      Reference

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