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10 Cities Around The World With The Most Job Opportunities

10 Cities Around The World With The Most Job Opportunities

Thanks to PricewaterhouseCoopers’ (PwC) 2014 report on Cities of Opportunity, job seekers have a handy list of some of the best cities to find a job across the world. Using 10 indicators to look at the factors that contribute to a well-balanced city, the study compared 30 different cities and ordered them based on how they rank for the most opportunities. Below, we take a closer look at the top 10.

10. Chicago

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    Today, Chicago is the third largest city in the U.S.–right after New York City and Los Angeles–with a population of 2.7 million people. Even so, PwC has ranked Chicago positively in cost, quality of life, and air quality. It’s situated in the top 10 for ease of doing business. With around 30 Fortune 500 companies based here, it’s no wonder that the job opportunities are high here.

    Job seekers here will flourish best in legal occupations, with an average salary running around $110,060 for this type of work in Chicago, says Bizjournals.com. Other high-paying jobs in the city are those in managerial positions, computer and mathematics, and architecture and engineering.

    9. Sydney

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      Sydney has long held a great reputation for work-life balance, beauty, and friendliness. PwC puts it as number one for sustainability and livability. Sydney is the center of financial, manufacturing, and cultural opportunities in Australia, making it a thriving place for business opportunities.

      8. Hong Kong

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        Hong Kong is among one of the best cities in the world for quality of life. In fact, it has one of the highest life expectancies world-wide. What’s more Hong Kong’s economy is ranked number one for economic freedom. Along with all these perks of living in Hong Kong, it’s rated number two by PwC for ease of doing business.

        7. Stockholm

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          As one of the fastest growing cities in Europe, Stockholm comes with numerous business opportunities. Stockholm is booming with a lively tech industry, with nearly 700 high-tech companies in the area. The city also focuses a lot of attention on sustainability and green technology. What’s more, according to Fortune magazine, Stockholm is one of the best cities for start-ups.

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          6. Paris

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            Paris sits at the top of PwC’s list for Intellectual Capital and Innovation. It’s full of fantastic museums, respected universities, and exceptional libraries to broaden the mind, adding a perk to individuals who choose to do business here. What’s especially great about the city is that it has some of the lowest unemployment rates in Europe, says JobsinParis.fr. Individuals in human resources, sales, and finance will find some of the highest salaries here.

            5. San Francisco

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              The thing that makes San Francisco so hot with opportunities is that it is home to some of the world’s largest companies. Plus, several huge companies like Google have outposts here. Those people in managerial positions, legal occupations, healthcare practitioning, and computer and mathematics will enjoy high salaries as reported by BizJournals.com.

              4. Toronto

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                Toronto maintains a high reputation for quality of life, ranking in the top three for safety, health, infrastructure, and security and transportation in PwC’s report. It also sits at number four for ease of doing business. Toronto thrives on distribution, industrial, and financial industries with a huge focus on banking and stocks.

                3. Singapore

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                  This city sits near the top of many lists outlined by PwC. Among these lists, it’s in the top three for transportation and infrastructure, city gateway, and ease of doing business. Singapore’s economy is heavy in electronics, chemicals, and services, and the city is a hub for wealth management, making it a fantastic place for people in a variety of industries. Medical doctors also receive some of the highest salaries here. What’s more, its economy has been ranked as the most open in the world, least corrupt, and most pro-business.

                  2. New York

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                    New York City is thriving with opportunities as the largest city in the United States, with opportunities available in a variety of industries across the board. PwC ranked the Big Apple in the top three for ease of doing business and second for most desired city for relocation. This city features huge business for stock exchanges and finance, but individuals in fashion, publishing, entertainment, technology, and more will find a wealth of opportunities here.

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                    1. London

                    from Trey Ratcliff at www.stuckincustoms.com

                      Sitting at number one for technology readiness, city gateway, and economic clout in PwC’s report, London is one of the hottest cities for job opportunities today. London is home to the most billionaires world-wide, with an economy focused on finance for international businesses. Senior executives, medical doctors, marketing and sales directors, and individuals in legal occupations will find some of the highest-paying jobs here.

                      Image Credits:
                      Chicago via Flickr by Matt Becker
                      Sydney Once Again via Flickr by Clint Sharp
                      A Symphony of Light – Hong Kong via Flickr by Spreg Ben
                      Spring Moon Over Stockholm via Flickr by Tobias Lindman
                      Paris Skyline at Sunset via Flickr by James Whitesmith
                      San Francisco Skyline Lighting via Flickr by Sudheer G
                      Hello Toronto via Flickr by Robert
                      Singapore via Flickr by Mike Behnken
                      New York City via Flickr by Rishad Daroowala
                      Approaching London via Flickr by Trey Ratcliff

                      Featured photo credit: _Davo_ via flickr.com

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                      Last Updated on March 29, 2021

                      5 Types of Horrible Bosses and How to Beat Them All

                      5 Types of Horrible Bosses and How to Beat Them All

                      When I left university I took a job immediately, I had been lucky as I had spent a year earning almost nothing as an intern so I was offered a role. On my first day I found that I had not been allocated a desk, there was no one to greet me so I was left for some hours ignored. I happened to snipe about this to another employee at the coffee machine two things happened. The first was that the person I had complained to was my new manager’s wife, and the second was, in his own words, ‘that he would come down on me like a ton of bricks if I crossed him…’

                      What a great start to a job! I had moved to a new city, and had been at work for less than a morning when I had my first run in with the first style of bad manager. I didn’t stay long enough to find out what Mr Agressive would do next. Bad managers are a major issue. Research from Approved Index shows that more than four in ten employees (42%) state that they have previously quit a job because of a bad manager.

                      The Dream Type Of Manager

                      My best manager was a total opposite. A man who had been the head of the UK tax system and was working his retirement running a company I was a very junior and green employee for. I made a stupid mistake, one which cost a lot of time and money and I felt I was going to be sacked without doubt.

                      I was nervous, beating myself up about what I had done, what would happen. At the end of the day I was called to his office, he had made me wait and I had spent that day talking to other employees, trying to understand where I had gone wrong. It had been a simple mistyped line of code which sent a massive print job out totally wrong. I learn how I should have done it and I fretted.

                      My boss asked me to step into his office, he asked me to sit down. “Do you know what you did?” I babbled, yes, I had been stupid, I had not double-checked or asked for advice when I was doing something I had not really understood. It was totally my fault. He paused. “Will you do that again?” Of course I told him I would not, I would always double check, ask for help and not try to be so clever when I was not!

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                      “Okay…”

                      That was it. I paused and asked, should I clear my desk. He smiled. “You have learnt a valuable lesson, I can be sure that you will never make a mistake like that again. Why would I want to get rid of an employee who knows that?”

                      I stayed with that company for many years, the way I was treated was a real object lesson in good management. Sadly, far too many poor managers exist out there.

                      The Complete Catalogue of Bad Managers

                      The Bully

                      My first boss fitted into the classic bully class. This is so often the ‘old school’ management by power style. I encountered this style again in the retail sector where one manager felt the only way to get the best from staff was to bawl and yell.

                      However, like so many bullies you will often find that this can be someone who either knows no better or is under stress and they are themselves running scared of the situation they have found themselves in.

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                      The Invisible Boss

                      This can either present itself as management from afar (usually the golf course or ‘important meetings) or just a boss who is too busy being important to deal with their staff.

                      It can feel refreshing as you will often have almost total freedom with your manager taking little or no interest in your activities, however you will soon find that you also lack the support that a good manager will provide. Without direction you may feel you are doing well just to find that you are not delivering against expectations you were not told about and suddenly it is all your fault.

                      The Micro Manager

                      The frustration of having a manager who feels the need to be involved in everything you do. The polar opposite to the Invisible Boss you will feel that there is no trust in your work as they will want to meddle in everything you do.

                      Dealing with the micro-manager can be difficult. Often their management style comes from their own insecurity. You can try confronting them, tell them that you can do your job however in many cases this will not succeed and can in fact make things worse.

                      The Over Promoted Boss

                      The Over promoted boss categorises someone who has no idea. They have found themselves in a management position through service, family or some corporate mystery. They are people who are not only highly unqualified to be managers they will generally be unable to do even your job.

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                      You can find yourself persistently frustrated by the situation you are in, however it can seem impossible to get out without handing over your resignation.

                      The Credit Stealer

                      The credit stealer is the boss who will never publically acknowledge the work you do. You will put in the extra hours working on a project and you know that, in the ‘big meeting’ it will be your credit stealing boss who will take all of the credit!

                      Again it is demoralising, you see all of the credit for your labour being stolen and this can often lead to good employees looking for new careers.

                      3 Essential Ways to Work (Cope) with Bad Managers

                      Whatever type of bad boss you have there are certain things that you can do to ensure that you get the recognition and protection you require to not only remain sane but to also build your career.

                      1. Keep evidence

                      Whether it is incidents with the bully or examples of projects you have completed with the credit stealer you will always be well served to keep notes and supporting evidence for projects you are working on.

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                      Buy your own notebook and ensure that you are always making notes, it becomes a habit and a very useful one as you have a constant reminder as well as somewhere to explore ideas.

                      Importantly, if you do have to go to HR or stand-up for yourself you will have clear records! Also, don’t always trust that corporate servers or emails will always be available or not tampered with. Keep your own content.

                      2. Hold regular meetings

                      Ensure that you make time for regular meetings with your boss. This is especially useful for the over-promoted or the invisible boss to allow you to ‘manage upwards’. Take charge where you can to set your objectives and use these meetings to set clear objectives and document the status of your work.

                      3. Stand your ground, but be ready to jump…

                      Remember that you don’t have to put up with poor management. If you have issues you should face them with your boss, maybe they do not know that they are coming across in a bad way.

                      However, be ready to recognise if the situation is not going to change. If that is the case, keep your head down and get working on polishing your CV! If it isn’t working, there will be something better out there for you!

                      Good luck!

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