Advertising

Welcome to the World of Laptops vs. Tablets

Advertising
Welcome to the World of Laptops vs. Tablets

With the continuation of technology, is it any wonder why people have difficulty choosing between a laptop and a tablet? When tablets were introduced to the masses in 2010, sales instantly skyrocketed. There wasn’t even an adjustment period as consumers just devoured this new gadget without question. Now, tablets are being released in the market left and right and continue to be the fastest-growing device in the world. In the process, laptops have lost their allure among consumers to give way to tablets. In 2010 alone, a total of 82.9 million laptops were shipped to buyers; the highest figures for laptop sales. In 2013, however, a projected 26.1 million of that would be eaten up by tablet sales. That’s 33% of total laptop sales.

Most people buy the latest gadget to make their lives easier, but because of the array of choices, it’s difficult to zero in on the best.  People in different walks of life have to consider different factors when choosing a device.

Advertising

For students

Take, for example, students who need electronic gadgets to further their education. As early as grade school, many parents would be willing to fork out a large amount of money for their children’s education. High school students value gadget portability since they still have to carry a lot of books and school items as well. A tablet would be better than a laptop since it is lighter; one can easily attach a virtual keyboard for any typing, like taking lecture notes. Besides, keyboards would not be cumbersome to carry since they are thin and light. Gadget preference could be somewhat different for university students, though. Consider one’s major when choosing between a laptop and a tablet: If one needs to use intricate programs, a high-powered laptop would be the better option. A tablet with a mere 16 to 64GB memory space is limited and would not be as useful as a laptop that could have up to 169 GB memory.

For people on the go

Let us also consider people on the go: these people would love to have a special gadget for everyday use. Considering the convenience of using a gadget for reading, watching films, or playing video games, a tablet is much better than a laptop, and the tablet’s 7- to 14-inch screen size would accommodate the needs of very active and mobile users. However, for those who require a bigger screen because of poor eyesight, a 17-inch laptop might be preferable.

Advertising

For professionals

There are also professionals who need a gadget for their work and leisure. Those who attend business trips and meetings would require something portable—A tablet would be a good choice for them since battery power on that device could last up to 18 hours, while a laptop can only last for an average of four hours. Charging would just be bothersome. However, if work required multi-tasking, a fully-functional laptop could do the job. Laptops are best for any kind of muscle work, including presentations, videos, and study results.

For kids

Of course, one must not forget the kids, who should be ahead of the times. Most kids would be using an electronic gadget for fun and entertainment. A tablet would help them learn and have fun with just their pointer finger; since a tablet is touch-screen, it would be easier to make choices with just a swipe. The interface of any tablet is easy to use; there is no need to follow any manuals—just a quick tap of a button and a kid could use it. In comparison to laptops with keyboards, a tablet is much simpler, which kids would like.

Advertising

With all the factors mentioned, before one buys either a laptop or a tablet, it is important to consider one’s projected use of the gadget, so both the features and the use should be taken into account. By paying attention to these two important points, it will be easier to choose a device. Other factors such as price, aesthetics, and “cool factor” should really take a backseat before features and usability are taken into consideration.

People say that tablets may be the death of laptops, but who knows what the future may bring? Laptops are now being redesigned to incorporate the great qualities of tablets. With the blurring of lines between laptops and tablets, varieties such as hybrids and ultrabooks have become readily available. While consumers can only expect better and more innovative gadgets in the years to come, the task of choosing the right gadget might prove to be more challenging .

Advertising

More by this author

Welcome to the World of Laptops vs. Tablets

Trending in Technology

1 How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private 2 20 Must-Have iPad Apps /iPhone Apps That You May Be Missing 3 Finally, 20 Productivity Apps That Will Ensure Efficiency 4 8 Useful Apps Every Learner Should Not Miss 5 Protecting Your Online Life With Secure Passwords

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on November 25, 2021

How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

Advertising
How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

    What Does Private Browsing Do?

    When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

    For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

    Advertising

    The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

    The Terminal Archive

    While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

    Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

    dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

    Advertising

    Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

    Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

    However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

    Clearing Your Tracks

    Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

    Advertising

    dscacheutil -flushcache

    As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

    Other Browsers and Private Browsing

    Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

    If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

    Advertising

    As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

    Read Next