Advertising
Advertising

Use Your LinkedIn Data to Create a Stunning Visual Resume

Use Your LinkedIn Data to Create a Stunning Visual Resume

    It’s a tough world out there. As economies dip and dive and job markets dwindle, competition for our dream job becomes all the more fierce and standing out from the crowd becomes more important than ever.

    If you’re blessed with a good grasp of web or graphic design, you should have few problems in creating a fantastic, informative and concise resume to put you head and shoulders above your peers. Yet the less tech-savvy among us need not worry, as the web provides many wonderful ways to create stunning resumes with nothing more than a few clicks of a mouse.

    A plethora of online tools exist, though there’s one which, much like the job-hunters who use it, really stands out for its simplicity and effectiveness. Greeting users with the tag line ‘Don’t send a resume, send a story,’ Re.vu is an easy-to-use platform with plenty of tools to create a visual resume that not only looks great, but puts the focus on the items you feel are most important.

    Advertising

    To make the most out of the site you’ll need an e-mail address and an up-to-date Linkedin profile.

    If you’re in the job market, you’re probably already established on Linkedin, but if not, many Lifehack scribes before me have written plenty of advice on how to make the most out of it, so we’ll assume for now that you’re set up and ready to rock.

    Getting started

    Head to Re.vu and set up free account. You’ll then be given the option to import your data from Linkedin. You can always skip this step, but pulling in your bio and resume will save you a lot of time in the long-run, so it’s worth doing.

    That done, it’s time to build your profile.

    Advertising

    The basics

    Landing on the Personal Data tab, you’ll find that your headline and bio are already there thanks to Linkedin, you can edit this if you wish, include your name, and upload a photo.

    You can also add links to your website and social media accounts, upload photos and even include a traditional resume for potential employers to download.

    Timeline

    Re.vu’s Timeline provides a visually-appealing way of displaying your work history, with the ability to add photos from data already culled from Linkedin.

    The result is far more arresting than a basic list of accomplishments, with the added bonus that potential employees can head straight to any particular piece of your history that stands out to them.

    Advertising

    Infographics

    This is perhaps the most fun tool in Re.vu’s arsenal, and can really add great value to your visual resume, highlighting your key skills, achievements and more.

    Here, you can add everything from testimonials to job duties, key proficiencies to personal interests and all manner of information in between, and the site will turn this date into sweet, simple infographs that put the things that matter to you (and, more importantly, to employers) front and centre.

    Portfolio and work examples

    The great thing about all online resumes of course is that you can link directly to any work your particularly proud of, and Re.Vu is no different.

    With Portfolio, you can share images of your work. Naturally, this is great for designers, or others working in visual mediums, though even if that’s not your field, why not upload snaps of a product launch, event or anything else you’re proud of?

    Advertising

    With Work Examples, you have the opportunity to share any articles or other documents you’d like to include that highlight your skills, knowledge, or perhaps even both.

    Design

    With all that done, it’s time to customize your profile using your own background image, a number of attractive themes and the ability to drag individual widgets around the page.

    If there’s one gripe against the site, it’s that, once you’ve chosen your theme, it isn’t possible to edit font styles or colors, yet with such an appealing design, this really is a minor quibble when you consider how easy it is to re-arrange, customize and add some great features to a stunning resume that can really help you stand out from the crowd.

    More by this author

    Chris Skoyles

    Coach, and trainee counsellor specializing in mental health and addiction.

    15 Successful People with Autism Who Have Inspired Millions of People 15 Natural Insomnia Cures That You Haven’t Tried But Actually Work 10 Anxiety Relief Apps to Take the Edge Off When Stress Hits Hard 13 Ideas on How to Help Depression That Just Won’t Go Away How Relaxing Music for Kids Can Help ADHD (+ Music Recommendations)

    Trending in Technology

    1 8 Replacements for Google Notebook 2 7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively 3 7 Clever Goal Tracker Apps to Make the Most of Your Business in 2019 4 10 Smartest Productivity Software to Improve Your Work Performance 5 18 Best Time Management Apps and Tools (2019 Updated)

    Read Next

    Advertising
    Advertising
    Advertising

    Last Updated on May 14, 2019

    8 Replacements for Google Notebook

    8 Replacements for Google Notebook

    Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

    1. Zoho Notebook
      If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
    2. Evernote
      The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
    3. Net Notes
      If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
    4. i-Lighter
      You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
    5. Clipmarks
      For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
    6. UberNote
      If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
    7. iLeonardo
      iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
    8. Zotero
      Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

    I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

    Advertising

    In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

    Advertising

    Advertising

    Read Next