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Top 10 Camera Apps For iPhone + 4 Bonus Photo Editing Apps

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Top 10 Camera Apps For iPhone + 4 Bonus Photo Editing Apps

You know what the “number 1” camera on Flickr is?

Yeah, it’s the iPhone 4.

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    Ever since Apple upped the ante with the iPhone 4 — and then blew that out of the water with the 4S — the iPhone has really taken off as a worthy alternative to a point-n-shoot camera. It’s perfect for those who want something that is both efficient and effective — something Lifehack readers yearn fro in a lot of their tech gear.

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    There are hundreds of photo apps out there (I should know…I think I bought most of them) that take your iPhoneography to the next level. I’ve picked top 10 camera apps for iPhone, but then I realized that there is so much more to taking pictures on the iPhone than just taking pictures, so as a bonus I’ve included my top 4 favorite apps to edit and enhance photos just to round things out.

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      Let’s get started…

      1. Camera+ $0.99. This is my go-to app to take pictures. I wish I could set it as my default camera app. What’s great? The in-app photo edits and fast sharing. Yeah, man.
      2. 360 Panorama $0.99. Want to make easy, peasy awesome looking panorama shots? Here you go. You’re welcome.
      3. GridLens $0.99. What to take a series of shots laid out in a cool frame or grid? This is the app. Maybe one picture divided or several different shots over a few seconds, it’s just tap and go.
      4. Hipstamatic $1.99. One of the leading “toy camera” app to let you give your iPhone shots different looks with software lenses, filters, and films. Its’ cool.
      5. Retro Camera Plus Free. This is a simple way to get those Hipstamtic style shots without spending a penny. I really like the Soviet-era camera styles included. Gritty and real is what those shots are, gritty and real.
      6. Snapseed $4.99. This might be the most expensive of these apps, but it’s also the one with the most robust editing suite as well. It’s like Camera+ meets iPhoto. Bonus…it’s a universal app that is awesome on the iPad too.
      7. Mattebox $3.99. Maybe a little pricy for a “basic” camera app, but the focus lock, white balance, and ISO displays make this a nice app for taking well composed shots.
      8. Instagram Free. Instagram is more than a photo app (or a Facebook property) it made photo sharing more social. Snap, tweak, share. Feel the love.
      9. Camera Awesome Free. From the folks at SmugMug, this app focuses (hah, hah) on composition and processing to make for great shots. Hey it is free, so always worth a try.
      10. 8mm Vintage Camera $1.99. This is the only pure video app in the list. What you get is an easy way to shoot “vintage” looking movies with your iPhone. It’s easy and the results are awesome.
      11. Labelbox Free This app is easy and simple labeler using a numbers of pretty tapes that stylishly labels your images and photos.
      12. Actioncam Free it’s quick and groups the action into one photo from three to nine frames within 1 second. You can also choose from a wide range of filters to beautify your image.
      13. Phototreats Free This app collects a lot of easy to use filters that turn your photo into a emotional scene like a painting.
      14. Fusioncam $0.99 This is an easy-to-us toy camera app that provides multiple exposure capabilities. It’s just like a real toy camera.
      And, of course, let’s not forget the default app — Camera. It’s the app that you can get to quickly from the lock screen. Just because Apple included it with your iPhone doesn’t make it any less of a great app. Grid overlay, HDR pictures, and even focus/exposure lock (tap and hold on a spot until the square pulses). It’s a solid app folks.

      Editing, tweaking, and extra:

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      1. Diptic $0.99. Diptic works like Grid Lens, except it doesn’t take pictures, just allows you to arrange existing pictures into frames. Before Grid Lens, this was my favorite way to make a photo collage.
      2. WordFoto $1.99 Overlay words onto a photo to make a word collage. Makes for awesome photos to share for fun.
      3. iPhoto $4.99. Until iPhoto came onto the scene, Snapseed was the only way to do serious photo editing on your iPhone (or iPad). iPhoto on the iPhone is a little cramped (so is Snapseed, by the way), but the features are great. Well worth the money.
      4. Magic Hour $1.99. There is a period of time just before and just after sunrise/sunset when the light is amazing. Photographers and film makers schedule their entire day to make the most use of Magic Hour. Now, do you know exactly when magic hour is where you are? Probably not. With is this app you will and …well, the results are awesome when you tap into the sun low in the sky. Try it.

      There are many more apps I could have included — like light meters and light boxes — but these are the top 10 camera apps for iPhone that I actually keep on my devices. Did I miss a great app? Let me know in the comments.

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      Last Updated on November 25, 2021

      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

      There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

      Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

        What Does Private Browsing Do?

        When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

        For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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        The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

        The Terminal Archive

        While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

        Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

        dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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        Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

        Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

        However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

        Clearing Your Tracks

        Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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        dscacheutil -flushcache

        As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

        Other Browsers and Private Browsing

        Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

        If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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        As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

        Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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