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Toodledo Keeps Upgrading

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Toodledo Keeps Upgrading

Jake Olefsky is working hard. He’s got even MORE features into Toodledo that should be enticing to practitioners of GTD and users of online to-do products. Check out the current feature list for this free web-based software:

  • Folders – You can organize your tasks into different folders or projects. For example, you could have a folder for work related tasks, one for home projects and another for your hobby. You can have unlimited tasks and unlimited folders.
  • Due-dates – Set a due-date for a task and we’ll remind you when the deadline is approaching. You can also have tasks that repeat once you finish them.
  • Priority – Some tasks are more important than others. With priorities, you can better sort and organize your tasks.
  • Time Tracking – By assigning an estimate of the time required for each task you can prioritize better and find small tasks to fill in little chunks of free time.
  • Notes – You can attach lengthy notes to any task, so you can keep track of important information.
  • Tags – Add tags or keywords to help describe the task. This can be used to keep track of the state or progress of a task. Or use it for your own organization scheme.
  • Collaboration – You can easily share your to-do lists with coworkers, friends, family or anyone else. You have complete control over who has permission to read or modify your to-do list.
  • Import / Export – It’s your data, so you should be able to take it with you. You can import and export your tasks in a variety of formats, including RSS, XML and iCal.
  • Customization – Easily hide fields that you don’t use or disable functionality that you don’t like.

Jake’s also got APIs released, mobile integration, and lots of other features worth checking out. See if this might integreat into your plans.

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Toodledo – via Tips

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Last Updated on November 25, 2021

How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

    What Does Private Browsing Do?

    When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

    For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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    The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

    The Terminal Archive

    While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

    Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

    dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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    Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

    Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

    However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

    Clearing Your Tracks

    Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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    dscacheutil -flushcache

    As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

    Other Browsers and Private Browsing

    Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

    If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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    As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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