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This is What to Expect from Apple in 2015

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This is What to Expect from Apple in 2015

There’s always a lot to look forward to from Apple, but the upcoming year looks particularly exciting. Coming up from Apple in 2015 is a brand new product called the Apple Watch; all the regular (but still exciting) yearly updates to technology like the MacBook, the iPhone, and the iPad; as well as possibly the much-anticipated revolutionary upgrade to the Apple TV. Read below to learn what to expect from Apple in 2015.

1. Apple Watch

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    Apple held its press event announcing the Apple Watch in September, but the gadget isn’t expected to debut for at least a couple more months until February. The first new category of product since the iPad launched in 2010, the Apple Watch is smart technology on your wrist similar to Android Wear. The Apple Watch will come in three forms: Watch, Watch Sport, and Watch Edition, each of which have multiple screen sizes to choose from. The price starts at $349.

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    Many think that the Apple Watch will legitimize wearable technology for the masses, so its launch is sure to be exciting. It’s arguably Apple’s most anticipated launch of 2015.

    2. MacBook Air Retina

    macbook-air-sale-discount

      A retina version of the crazy-thin MacBook Air is expected from Apple in early 2015. With the help of new Intel CPUs, Apple finally has a way to use a retina display for its MacBook Airs while holding on to a 10-hour battery life. This isn’t going to revolutionize the PC market by any stretch, but it’s sure to delight a lot of computer users looking for higher resolution screens. It will likely start at $899, the same price as the current MacBook Air.

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      3. iPhone 6s/7

      iPhone6_34FR_SpGry_iPhone6plus_34FL_SpGry_Homescreen_HERO

        The new iPhone, whatever it’s called, will get a lot of attention like all iPhones do, but the upgrades expected honestly aren’t anything all that special. They might upgrade from gorilla glass to scratch-resistant sapphire and move up to a more powerful A9 chip. There’s also a remote possibility of wireless charging and maybe a reversible USB charger, but those are only rumors right now. If history is any indication, the new iPhone will launch in September. A $199 price with a two-year cell phone contract can be expected.

        4. iPad Pro/iPad Plus

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        iPadAir2_iPadMini3_Lockscreen_HERO

          I don’t know how many people were clamoring for a bigger iPad from Apple in 2015, but for those who were, I’ve got good news. What may be known as the iPad Pro or the iPad Plus is expected to be 12.9 inches. Targeted primarily for professional use, the word is that Apple and IBM partnered to create around a hundred enterprise apps for iPads and iPhones. Since the tablet market is on unsteady ground, Apple hopes this new iPad will shake things up. The expected release date for the device is currently somewhere between April and June, but that could easily change. The iPad Pro/iPad Plus could either start at the current iPad’s price of $499 or jump to $599.

          5. Apple TV

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            The $99 streaming box competing with the likes of Roku, Chromecast and the Amazon Fire TV is hopefully getting a long-awaited upgrade from Apple in 2015. The biggest hurdle for Apple is acquiring content that will enable them to steal people away from their cable subscriptions. HBO offering a streaming service separate from cable was a good start, but Apple needs more than that. There are rumors that the new Apple TV will have a PVR-style hard drive, which could turn it into a full home entertainment device. That would mean that it would cost significantly more than its current $99 price tag, though. No release date is known, though fans are hoping it will show up sometime in the new year.

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            Hopefully we’ll see the Apple TV, along with all the other gadgets, at some point from Apple in 2015.

            Featured photo credit: Apple amnesty/Dan Taylor via flickr.com

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            Matt OKeefe

            Matt is a marketer and writer who shares about lifestyle and productivity tips on Lifehack.

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            Last Updated on November 25, 2021

            How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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            How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

            There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

            Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

              What Does Private Browsing Do?

              When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

              For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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              The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

              The Terminal Archive

              While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

              Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

              dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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              Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

              Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

              However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

              Clearing Your Tracks

              Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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              dscacheutil -flushcache

              As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

              Other Browsers and Private Browsing

              Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

              If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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              As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

              Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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