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This 3D Printing Pen Will Blow Your Mind

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This 3D Printing Pen Will Blow Your Mind

Most of us have probably heard of 3D printers, which literally allow you to create an object out of thin air. Much like a regular inkjet printer, you first program it, telling it exactly what it is you want it to print (many of them will come with pre-programmed designs). After you make your selection, you just let it go to work. Nifty, eh?

Due to its usefulness and malleability, 3D printing is becoming a booming industry, and many companies are looking to take advantage of this new technology to create awesome customized products.

While you can get a 3D printer of your own for about the cost of a new computer, it might behoove you to start a little smaller. This is where the 3D pen comes in. The 3D pen first gained some recognition thanks to the emergence of the “3Doodler” and its associated Kickstarter campaign.

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As you might imagine, the folks designing the 3Doodler got a lot of monetary support from folks, and thus the 3D pen became something of a hit. While many use them to do some simple doodling (creating cubes and the like), others choose to make intricate works of art. One company, SHIGO, decided to take this kind of creativity to the next level by using a 3Doodler to create a beautiful partially 3D printed dress, which is pictured above.

In order to accomplish this rather amazing feat, they first created a cloth outline of the dress. Then, artists used a 3Doodler to trace this outline, effectively bringing a 2D template to life.

For those who don’t know how a 3D pen works, it’s basically like a safer version of a hot glue gun, in the sense that it’s filled with a plastic based cartridge that melts and allows you to redistribute the material in any manner that you desire. As you might imagine, it takes a steady hand to ensure that all of this melted plastic doesn’t get all over the place, which is why SHIGO enlisted the help of actual artists and designers to get the 3D dress printed correctly.

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Indeed, as one article notes, all it takes is for you to release just a little bit too much plastic to ruin what would be an otherwise amazing creation.

What is the significance of the 3D pen? Well, in my estimation, it is indicative of a trend toward people being able to customize things exactly how they want them. In the future, perhaps we will all have 3D pens and printers of our own. Like SHIGO, we might decide one morning to design a shirt for ourselves. Or perhaps even a pair of shoes. Or maybe a case for our phones. The possibilities really are endless.

Indeed, SHIGO’s efforts reveal how one day fashion might revolve around day-to-day user-creativity rather than today’s fleeting fads. I mean, if you happen to be artistically inclined, why wouldn’t you choose to personally draw out some of the things you wear? Perhaps they won’t be perfect, but they would be unique, which has its own charm.

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If we are thinking big picture, it wouldn’t be totally out there to say that 3D pens and 3D printing in general are setting the stage for something even bigger. Why stop at dresses and small products? Perhaps one day we will be printing cars, planes, TVs – you name it.

That is what I think is the main takeaway here. 3D printing will become even more impactful than it is now once we figure out a way to use it on a much larger scale. The benefits to say, a 3D printer that prints cars, would be enormous. Not only would it cut down on production times, but it would reduce manufacturing mishaps since there would be far fewer moving parts involved.

Anyways, perhaps I am getting ahead of myself. For now, let’s appreciate the work of the folks over at SHIGO, and thank them for taking some of the first steps into what will assuredly be an intriguing future for 3D printing.

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Featured photo credit: 3D dress/ Fabbaloo via fabbaloo.com

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Last Updated on November 25, 2021

How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

    What Does Private Browsing Do?

    When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

    For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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    The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

    The Terminal Archive

    While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

    Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

    dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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    Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

    Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

    However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

    Clearing Your Tracks

    Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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    dscacheutil -flushcache

    As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

    Other Browsers and Private Browsing

    Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

    If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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    As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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