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These 20 Eye-Tracking Heat Maps Tell Us What People Really See

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These 20 Eye-Tracking Heat Maps Tell Us What People Really See

Coming up with attention-grabbing advertisements or intriguing interfaces may seem to be enough, but as these heat maps show, we all tend to focus on specific things when viewing something.

Do we tend to look at the faces in ads or the actual product being shown? And how do most of us read social media or news site homepages?

Take a look at these 20 eye-tracking heat maps to see how audiences view popular advertisements and media online.

1. Too much information can be distracting. When it comes to news, less may in fact be more!

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    2. While grocery shopping, most us are focused on the prices first.

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      3. Often, the model’s face can actually attract as much attention as the product.

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        4. When watching football, many of us are keeping our eyes on the ball intensely.

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          5. On Google, the top five search results get all the attention.

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            6. Meanwhile, photos tend to attract the most attention on Facebook.

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              7. Surprisingly, most people chose to read rather than examine this Porsche here.

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                8. Just left of the centre of a sign is apparently the best place for a product display.

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                  9. When gazing upon The Last Supper, most people look at the faces, but some tend to take a peak at the gap between heads.

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                    10. Although this is an add for jewelery, more people focused on the faces.

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                      11. There are some clear differences between how men and women view advertisements.

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                        12. His beard may be spectacular, but most people still focused on his face.

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                          13. Smartwater gets the attention, but so does his shoulder apparently.

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                            14. However, Scarlett Johansson is far too distracting in this Dolce & Gabbana ad.

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                              15. Not only is the face important, but so is where the model looks.

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                                16. Apparently the end of The Strip in Las Vegas is the most visually appealing.

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                                  17. When it comes to billboards, people appear to read the text rather than look at the gigantic faces displayed.

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                                    18. Banner Blindness is real!

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                                      19. While reading your resume, potential employers primarily read your name, past positions and education.

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                                        20. People do read the labels, but only after inspecting the meat.

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                                          Featured photo credit: Heat Map – Gyms in Washington DC 51193 via flickr.com

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                                          Siobhan Harmer

                                          Siobhan is a passionate writer sharing about motivation and happiness tips on Lifehack.

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                                          Last Updated on November 25, 2021

                                          How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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                                          How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

                                          There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

                                          Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

                                            What Does Private Browsing Do?

                                            When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

                                            For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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                                            The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

                                            The Terminal Archive

                                            While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

                                            Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

                                            dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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                                            Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

                                            Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

                                            However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

                                            Clearing Your Tracks

                                            Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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                                            dscacheutil -flushcache

                                            As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

                                            Other Browsers and Private Browsing

                                            Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

                                            If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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                                            As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

                                            Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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