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These 10 Chrome Extensions Will Brighten Up Your Day Every Time You Open A “New Tab” Page

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These 10 Chrome Extensions Will Brighten Up Your Day Every Time You Open A “New Tab” Page

Check out these Google Chrome extensions to motivate, inspire, and create functional and stunning visual homepages, each time you open a new tab.

1. MOMENTUM

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    Momentum greets you like artificial intelligence straight out of the movie “Her.” It is personalized to your time zone, local weather and name, and lets you set a focus for the day. When you start your day and start up Chrome, you are greeted with this as your first screen, giving you a moment to reflect before you dive into your workday. Beautiful images, flat design, and a motivational quote to get you moving. It also has a search feature so you can browse right from there. A breath of fresh air!

    2. CURRENTLY 

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      With a flat design you can customize to your liking with background and font color, this gives you a window on the weather where you are, the date, and a countdown clock. Keep it simple and minimal.

      3. DAYBOARD

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        Start your day off with a productive bang. Create a to-do-list of five items when you open Chrome. Every time you open a new tab, it reminds you to complete your daily tasks. The next day, it will carry over yesterday’s tasks in case you did not complete them all. It’s like a gentle reminder, keeping you on task when you get lost in browsing the internet aimlessly. It saves a list of your completed tasks, so you can remember when you completed something. Pure genius.

        4. DREAM AFAR

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          Take a vacation to an exotic destination from the comfort of your laptop. This extension shows a new destination daily, and is perfect for the armchair traveler, carried away by an image. Like Momentum, it adds in weather and time for your location, and a list of your top sites. Makes you want to keep opening tabs to travel around the world!

          5. GOOGLE MAPS EARTH VIEW 

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            To get some true perspective on how small your problems really are each time you open up a new tab, add the Google Earth View extension to get a view from atop a Satellite. It randomly opens a new image with each tab, and lets you see the Earth like no travel excursion ever will. A floating sidebar lets you share the image to social media, and it tells you where you in the world you are, to the bottom right. The image above is from Khour va Biabanak County, Iran(Google). 

            6. PINTEREST TAB

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            pinteresttab

              This one let’s you pick a category to get inspired by each day. When you select one topic, and then hit “start my day,” It picks an image from that category that you are interested in. What a fun way to let Pinterest spark your interest and to show you things you may not search for on your own. It also links to your calendar, so you can double check what your day has in store for you without leaving the page.

              7. IOS 7 NEW TAB

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                If you are an Apple iOS 7 user (and lover), why not have your browser show up in the same style? With flat design, icons, and backgrounds, have your big screen look like your small iPhone screen. You can edit from a group of backgrounds, and add the apps that you want to view. It automatically brings up popular apps, which you may or may not already use. It even gives you the option to upload your icons and customize the look even further. Keep your platforms looking and feeling the same universally.

                8. CARD BOARD

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                  Card Board is a Google specific new tab page that you get to customize. You can see your recent downloads, all your apps, or do a Google search straight from the page. It does not allow you to customize the colors or theme, and from a design perspective, is a bit lacking, but it’s still in the beta phase. Be one of the first to check it out.

                  9. AWESOME

                  awesome

                    Awesome lets you customize widgets, much like the Apple iOS dashboard on your laptop does. You can add popular site widgets, and search right from the tab page. The ability to upload your own image, or choose from any background color let you make it feel like home. Get everything you need all in one place. How … awesome!

                    10. HOME

                    HOME

                      Get everything in one place with Home. You can create notes, get e-mail and feed reader notifications, and see all your favorite sites like app badges in one place. You can select your own background, yet the default wood panel background feels cozy and inviting. Tailor it to your e-mail account to get your e-mail notifications. No need to switch back and forth between tabs when you can get it all here at HOME.

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                      Featured photo credit: multitasking man using tablet, laptop and cellphone connecting wifi via shutterstock.com

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                      Last Updated on November 25, 2021

                      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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                      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

                      There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

                      Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

                        What Does Private Browsing Do?

                        When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

                        For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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                        The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

                        The Terminal Archive

                        While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

                        Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

                        dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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                        Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

                        Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

                        However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

                        Clearing Your Tracks

                        Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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                        dscacheutil -flushcache

                        As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

                        Other Browsers and Private Browsing

                        Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

                        If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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                        As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

                        Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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