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The iPhone case even Macgyver would covet.

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The iPhone case even Macgyver would covet.

There is nothing worse than being stranded somewhere and realizing you do not have what you need to make your situation better. I mean, Macgyver could build a house with string and a paperclip. Well, not really, but you know what I mean.

In our cars we have tire irons, jacks, and spares to help get us back on the road, but what if you get a flat riding your bike on the way to class? We have all seen those cute little multitasking tools, but some of them are not practical when it comes to carrying them every day.

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This is where the MyTask iPhone case comes in. Currently seeking funds through Kickstarter, MyTask gives you something other multitaskers do not: versatility. This Macgyver-like case has an interchangeable sliding tray on the bottom allowing you to take what you need, when you need it, for the day. There are three trays offered during the Kickstarter campaign: Urban, Bike, and Stash. MyTask hopes to release more options after they reach their funding goals.

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    The Bike case with it’s nifty tools.

    The Urban case, weighing only 2.2 ounces, has 12 helpful tools:

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    • full-size 2″ scissors
    • personal mirror
    • dual eyeglass screwdrivers
    • ruler
    • flathead screwdriver
    • 3-mode LED light
    • tweezers
    • black pen
    • touch stylus
    • USB drive (8 GB)
    • bottle opener
    • Phillips screwdriver
    • nail file

    The Bike tray has 18 tools, plus tire patches, and only weighs 2.8 ounces:

    • 3 tube patches and tire roughener
    • flathead screwdriver
    • two tire irons
    • bottle opener
    • pedal and axle wrench
    • Phillips screwdriver
    • 6 Allen wrenches
    • 4 box wrenches
    • 2 spoke wrenches

    The Stash tray does not have any tools, but instead gives you an empty tray to “stash” your personal items. It is 3.5 mm deep, or about 1/8 inch, to store credit cards, keys, memory cards, or cash. The options are pretty endless with the stash tray. MyTask designed the trays to be interchangeable, so if on Monday you ride your bike to class, but Thursday you have to work late, you can swap your Bike tray with the Urban tray and be prepared for whatever life throws at you. Other similar cases on the market currently only offer one option.

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    All the cases are TSA compliant, even the Urban tray, so you can take your case on a plane without worry. All the tools are made from 1.5 mm hardened 440C stainless steel. They are incredibly strong so you don’t have to worry about them snapping or breaking on you.You can view a test video of the Allen wrench tool on YouTube.

    What do you think about these cases? I think they would come in handy. I know some people carry a pocket knife, but there are a few places that will not allow you to carry them, like planes. Sure, this case cannot provide a full supply of useful implements, but I think it does a pretty good job at giving you what you might need in an emergency. Regardless of what life throws at you, you will be ready for it with the MyTask case.

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    Featured photo credit: MyTask Kickstarter Page via s3.amazonaws.com

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    Last Updated on November 25, 2021

    How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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    How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

    There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

    Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

      What Does Private Browsing Do?

      When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

      For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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      The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

      The Terminal Archive

      While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

      Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

      dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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      Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

      Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

      However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

      Clearing Your Tracks

      Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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      dscacheutil -flushcache

      As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

      Other Browsers and Private Browsing

      Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

      If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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      As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

      Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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